Ebay - OT

sweetheart wrote:

Sometimes it might be a shill bidder, i.e. the seller bids on his own item from another account to bump the price up, or someone conspires with the seller to do the same, eBay claim to stamp down on it, I'm not sure how strongly ...
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On 10/04/2011 05:16, sweetheart wrote:

Aside from the fact that their fees are a bit high, I have had very few problems buying or selling on it.

Its usually easy enough to compare ebay to other online web sales sites - typically dealers on ebay are comparable or better. You also find an increasing number of business that have real shops and also sometimes web sites of their own, will also maintain an ebay shop so as not to miss the business done there. Axminster power tools for example.

This is what is called sniping[1]. Its designed to take advantage of both human nature (i.e. the fact that people will often bid over their pre-decided maximum in the heat of the moment) - so slipping a bid in at the end prevents this, and also takes advantage of folks (no offence, but by the sounds of it in this case you!) who don't understand how ebay bidding works.
So first lesson: ebay proxy bidding. When you place a bid on ebay, you are not bidding the amount you place. What you are telling ebay is that is the maximum that you are prepared to bid.
So for example. Your plate is sat there at the opening price of 1.99. You decide that you would be prepared to pay up to £10 for the plate. Hence you first and *only* bid should be for £10. Ebau will now bid on your behalf, and enter the opening bid of £1.99. If no one else bids, then at auction close, you win if for that amount. Say however someone comes and enters a maximum bid of £5. Ebay will immediately out bid them on your behalf and place a bid of £5.50 (or whatever the next bid "increment" above the current bis is. It carries on like this until either you are outbid, or you win. You will get an email if you are outbid.

Ebay is available for end users and dealers - the only difference is the fee structure is a bit different. So there is no point being upset by it - that is the way it is supposed to be. (probably 80%+ of sales are from business sellers)

The only person you are hurting here is you. The dealer has done nothing to hide the fact they are a dealer - especially if they maintain and ebay "shop".

OK, log into ebay, and click on the "advanced search" link next to the search button. Type a description of your plate into the search box, and click the "completed listings" check box. Then click search. It will now show all the recent completed auctions that sold something like that which you want. Prices shown in red are ones where no sale happened (i.e. did not reach opening price or reserve), ones in green show the final value of the sale. That will give you and idea of what folks are prepared to pay. With something that is collectable and not readily available, then that *is* the reasonable (ebay) price. Say folks are routinely parting with £20 for it, and a dealer comes along and sticks an opening price of £40 on a similar one - it simply won't get any bids - hence its not possible for a dealer to "rip off" anyone in this way.

Find out what the plates have sold for as above. Go back and bid again with the maximum bid you are prepared to pay if its over the normal sale price. Remember a dealer needs margin to make money, so they will not be interested in paying top money for something. Hence you will probably win it or lose out to another collector like yourself.

Regardless, so long as you know how to lookup the typical selling prices, and you only bid up to what you are prepared to pay, they you can't be ripped off.

[1] Sniping - bidding in the last few seconds of an auction. This is typically done with software and not by manually entering bids.
It is *particularly* common with collectables, since frequent buyers and sellers of collectables will build up a reputation for knowing what it potentially valuable and hence worth bidding on. So they have a problem - if they see something that is perhaps not well described and recognise it as something potentially far more valuable than the owner realises, they would obviously want to did. However if they do so, they also attract attention to the item. So setting their sniping program to bid 3 secs from the end means that they don't disclose their interest until that information is no longer of value.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Very informative posting from John (as usual!)
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says...

So what's the problem? IF they don't sell then they've lost money. If they do then the prices aren't "inflated", they're what that segment of the market will bear.
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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firefox / Tools / Addons get Addons MyIbay auction bid sniper
[g]
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ust Google" Auctionsniper" and follow the instructions..they will put your bid in... at the time you say...I usually say 5 sec. before the end...then you will be the winner.... if it is the highest..and no time for someone else to outbid you..that is what is being done to you....so no matter what you bid, you will only pay just above the previous highest bid... Also saves you time and frustration sitting around and the cost of this service is very low. The site gives details Worth checking. I have won lots of things this way. If you stick to a figure which is the highest you will pay, then eventually you will win one. good luck David G
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On Apr 10, 5:16 am, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:

I do that. Any earlier than 3 seconds is a waste of time. I also used to watch auctions excitedly when I first used E-Bay.
If you stick in a bid ( say £15 for an item currently at £2) you will usually find the seller has used another E-bay account to bid against you and push the price up. You used to be able to check up on bidders' bidding history, but E-Bay changed their rules, 2 or 3 years ago, to favour the fraudsters. E-Bay still gets their percentage. It was very common. I haven't used E-bay much since then.
I now decide what an item is worth to me and stick in a bid for that amount in the last few seconds. If someone outbids you, then it was obviously worth more to them.
I once bought a plate on E-bay and Postman Pat had played rugger with the package before it arrived; it wasn't merely broken, it had been nearly reduced to a fine powder. The insurance doesn't cover ceramics or glass and the Post Office employees see it as a challenge to ensure every fragile item is thoroughly mashed. No amount of packaging will protect it. I wouldn't bother buying plates unless you can collect them.
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On 12/04/2011 16:36 Onetap wrote:

I thought they were throwing under-arm nowadays...?
--
F



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Thats not fair on the Royal Mail. Two of my items have arrived safe and sound with the post man this morning.
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On Wed, 13 Apr 2011 10:02:40 +0100, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:

266 articles and counting ... there's rather less said when the topic is angle grinders.
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