Apple ipads (again)

On 29/10/2012 13:57, Steve Firth wrote:

Probably true, AMD processors and chipsets aren't that good. However it can run several of them in parallel unlike daisychaining them from one port.

Don't lie, they do. Intel designed the original Apple PCs just as they did the original ultrabooks.

Learn to read. I never said it was running apple cr@p. I said it runs it just as easily. There are plenty of people that do run hakintoshes, I pity them really as there is no need to.
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On Sun, 28 Oct 2012 10:20:47 +0000, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

DE9 on more recent stuff, DB25 on older kit (DB9 would be the same physical size as DB25, but with only 9 pins).
Use of DB25 was overkill for many situations, but IIRC the full spec uses most, if not all, of the 25 pins; PCs (and many other systems) just didn't provide all of the functionality.
Of course there was plenty of atypical stuff out there at one point in time - e.g. I've seen multi-port cards with DC37 connectors, and NCR used DA15's on some of their UNIX kit.

Thankfully the only experience I had of doing what you're doing was with software that would still run on Win95 - so it was easy to plonk it onto an old laptop which still had real ports on it.
cheers
Jules
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Huh? A DB25 is much bigger than a DB9.
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I was thinking that - but don't understand what the second letter of the DB means. Jules mentions A, B &E
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Monday, October 29, 2012 3:22:57 PM UTC, Huge wrote:

yep, and I remmeber the 37 way even biggertoo.
The 15 way high density commonly used for video on PCs is the same physical size as the DB9 way D types, then there were the standard DB15 15 way.

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On Tue, 30 Oct 2012 05:33:54 -0700, whisky-dave wrote:

DC37.
DE15.

DE9.
DA15.
The shell size is denoted by the second letter - the only exception I can immediately think of (other than PC-world mislabeling of the DE9 as a DB9) is the DB23 as was used by the Amiga - the shell's slightly narrower due to having 2 pins less than the DB25, but it was always called a DB23 anyway.
(and now I feel horribly nerdy - thanks! ;-)
I found a wiki page covering it here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-subminiature
cheers
Jules
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Interesting. The Megasquirt uses a standard 9 pin Series connector (same shell size as a VGA 15 pin) and a 37 pin for the engine stuff. Both the same height, but the 37 pin obviously wider. And are called DB9 and DB37 in all the parts literature including the DigiKey stuff who are the recommended parts supplier.
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On Tue, 30 Oct 2012 14:08:04 +0000, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

It seems to be a bit of a mixed bag with Digikey - searching for DE9 coughs up a lot of results, as does DB9. DB9 is wrong according to the connector's history - but that isn't to say that years of misuse (primarily within the PC world) haven't corrupted the meaning to the point that manufacturers themselves are getting it wrong (and there's another possibility, that they know perfectly well that it's wrong, but most of their user-base revolves around PCs where users will likely be searching for the wrong name).
It was probably the early '90s when I first started seeing DB9 in common use. It might be a bit of a stretch, but I wonder if a few manufacturers thought that the DB prefix in DB25 simply stood for D-sub, and that's why it got carried over to the smaller shell size. Heck, or maybe even 'data bus' or something...
ISTR at least one Compaq machine avoiding the confusion by simply labeling their DB25 serial port with a picture of a modem, and their DE9 serial port with a picture of a tape backup unit :-)
cheers
Jules
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Found on t'internet, an oldie but goodie. I have a yellowing printout of this somewhere from years ago:
DL-232 -- A New Standard
by Dave Lyons (CompuCenter Iowa: JoeApple; CompuServe 72177,3233)
I may never understand how the designers of the RS-232 "standard" for serial communication managed to use 25 wires where only 3 are really necessary. Maybe they made a deal with the companies that make cables, connectors, and switch boxes... I just don't know.
Well, I thought of a few things that the RS-232 standard lacks, and since there are already so many extra signals, a few more can't hurt anybody, right? Heck, let's go for 50-pin connectors and cables and add the following new signals. (Just to make sure this isn't compatible with any old equipment, all OLD signals are moved up one pin number (Carrier Detect becomes 9 instead of 8, etc., and pin 25 goes to pin 1).
Pin Name Description --- ---- ----------- 26 XCAT Should be connected to chassis of devices. Used with the next two signals, this provides protection against cats who haven't learned not to walk on floppy disks or serial equipment. This signal should supply about 2000 volts (at a VERY low current level; wouldn't want to HURT the cute little thing, just teach it not to walk on anything in the computer room).
27 CATGND Cat ground. Used with pin 26. This signal should be connected to another part of the chassis or the tabletop.
28 CTD Cat detect.
29 SD Self-destruct. This signals causes the device to destroy itself.
30 SDACK Self-destruct acknowledge. Acknowledges that the device has destroyed itself.
31 VADIC This signal indicates to a computer that the device on the other end is a modem that uses VADIC protocol. (Note: CompuCenter Iowa users should jumper this signal to SD and then buy a decent modem.)
32 STBIT1 Stutter bits. With pin 33, sets the number of "stutter bits" (0 to 3 of them) to be included before each byte transmitted. This may reduce the number of people who feel inferior to computer equipment by showing them that computers have problems communicating with each other. 33 STBIT2
34 CABR Cable ready. It's not enough to know that the Data Set is ready (DSR) and the Data Terminal is read (DTR). We also need to know that the CABLE connecting them is ready.
35 GRR Gremlins ready. Not everybody knows it, but there are little green guys inside most modern computer equipment. Most of the time they sleep, but other times they cause trouble. The next 6 signals are for dealing with gremlins.
36 220A Used with pin 37, supplies 220 volt power for the gremlins' air conditioning. On hot days when gremlins can't sleep, applying power to these pins may solve your problems. 37 220B
38 110H 110 volts, hot side. When the 220 volt power doesn't help and gremlin problems persist, use this with pin 39 to supply 110 volts for the gremlins' TV and video game center.
39 110N 110 volts, neutral side.
40 MOON Indicates the phase of the moon. Sometimes solves mysterious problems.
41 LHI Pins 41 through 45 can be used to implement the "like" protocol when the normal RTS/CTS protocol isn't enough. This one means "Like HI" and is used to establish a connection.
42 LHTY2 Like HI to You Too. Acknowledges pin 41.
43 LLTT Like Listen To This. Requests permission to send data.
44 LOK Like OK. Grants permission to transmit data.
45 LWOW Like WOW. Acknowledges receipt of data.
46 HEY Pins 46 to 50 may be used to implement the "Eighties" protocol when RTS/CTS and "Like" protocols won't do the job. This signal is similar to RTS (Request to Send).
47 NP No Problem. Acknowledges HEY.
48 HUH? Signals that data was not received correctly (possibly wrong number of stutter bits).
49 YEAH Acknowledges data received.
50 KMG365 Like YEAH, but for avid Emergency One fans.
That makes 50! Let's hear your suggestions for MORE serial signals. Maybe we can get 100 and REALLY make the cable manufacturers happy.
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wrote:

In all cases I've come across, it's the external hardware that isn't correctly presenting itself as a "serial port", often only making connections to Rx and Tx.
MBQ
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In article

That's all MegaSquirt does. Works on all the serial ports I've tried and on at least some of the USB adaptors.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave's problem (and I have it too) is that he has a programmable ECU in his car (Megasquirt, right? I have Omexes in both the toy cars) which uses a serial port to talk to the programming laptop, and the software that does that only runs under Windows (or sometimes, DOS!) and doesn't work well with USB/Serial converters.
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Yeah, most of the software sold for programming car ECUs is shite.
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Tuner Studio for MegaSquirt is brilliant, and under constant development with input from its users.
http://tunerstudio.com/index.php/tuner-studio
I've not got that much experience of others, but they do sometimes seem rather crude.
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escribi:

Inane tripe. The i-pad (a glorified games machine) is laptop sized - semi-portable. It replaces a laptop. Makers found that 10" tablets were too big and then made the portable 7", which can fit in a pocket of your overcoat. Even train spotters can them in their anorak pockets, you should try one and keep your train numbers on one. Apple are playing catchup. The new 7" offering of theirs is dire in performance and very expensive. The Nexus 7 pees all over it.
This brings me to the point of having a cheap touch screen phone (organizes the texts well) with NFC to tether the Nexus 7, so you can access the cellphone network. Then the monthly cell phone rental bills are very low, as no i-phone or Galaxy is needed. What te smart phone do can be done better on the Nexus 7, so no need for an expensive snmart phone.
What you save on a monthly phone contract would pay for a few Nexus 7s within a year or so. So, the Nexus can even save you money. The real powerful computer, pc or laptop, will be at home. The Nexus is also faster than the i-pad.
The Nexus 7 is now in 32GB for the same price as the 16GB - from Argos in a few weeks. That's if you need the capacity of course. The games nuts tend to want the extra storage.
So:
1. A Powerful laptop/PC at home. 2. A cheap touch screen smart pohone for calls, texts and occasional emails. 3. A Nexus 7 doing far better what the expensive smart phones did.
That give all you need and CHEAPLY to buy and in running costs.
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As I said, Android is for people who have short arms and long pockets. Then they sit around and shout sour grapes at those who use a computer platform that actually works.
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wrote:

More madness.
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From you, nothing else is possible.
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wrote:

More madness.
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wrote:

More knobness.
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