OT: Steering wheel

Where do you put your hands on the steering wheel when driving? I noticed one person at the 10 to 2 position (oh dear), then everyone else seemed to have just their right hand on the wheel, but near the top! I thought most people (unless they're learning to drive) put their hand at the bottom.
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I use my left knee.
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Who's a big boy then?
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Some are real men ...
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On 3/21/2016 11:49 AM, Mr Macaw wrote:

With most air bags, you better have hands below where they might go off otherwise you might get a thumb in you eye in an accident.
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So the 10 to 2 position we're taught is actually dangerous?
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You probably get away with 10 and 2. It is high noon that will get you a punch in the face. Rings and watches only make that worse. If things are getting dicey, you probably want both hands on the wheel anyway.
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On Mon, 21 Mar 2016 13:31:03 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

10 and 2 is pretty safe. The airbag will push your hands out and back, missing your face .
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca formulated the question :

Wouldn't a steering ball be more better? That way only one hand is needed to steer. The other hand can hold the cell phone, yes?
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WRONG! You need one hand for your cellphone and the other hand for your beer. You steer with your left knee!
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Why the LEFT knee?
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wrote:

where is the best location to install the suicide knob?
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The what?
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It is sort of like a door knob that is placed on the rim of the stering wheel. You grip it with one hand and use it to turn the stering wheel. The knob will face you and is made to rotate so you can get a good grip on the wheel.
Makes it easy to back up the car and drive with one hand while drinking the beer with the other.
I think the government made it illegal in the US because it might hirt you in a crash.
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@earthlink.net says...

Not so.
http://www.suicideknob.net/state_laws.html
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How come this law?
"However, there is a law against using them for construction vehicles that haul and handle materials."
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Perhaps OSHA doesn't want "handicapped people" hauling hazardous materials?
Actually, I don't see an outright ban on them, but I just skimmed over the clauses.
1926.602(c)(1)(iv) Steering or spinner knobs shall not be attached to the steering wheel unless the steering mechanism is of a type that prevents road reactions from causing the steering handwheel to spin. The steering knob shall be mounted within the periphery of the wheel.
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Ah, so something to do with driving your construction vehicle on a rough track and your hand getting broken when the wheel suddenly moves. Much like don't put your thumbs on the inside of the 4x4 steering wheel when going offroad.
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In New York State, however, a doctor's prescription for a spinner now must be submitted to the NYSDMV, which in turn, shows that the knob is "required" on all vehicles the user drives and such requirement is entered on the user's drivers license. There is a USA federal labor law restricting their use for specific construction vehicles; although hydraulic driven power steering vehicles may not fall under this category
For forklifts: The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) publication B56.1-2004 (and previous ANSI versions), Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks, addresses modifications to trucks and the use of spinner knobs.
Paragraph 4.2.1 requires modifications which may affect the safe operation of the truck be approved in writing by the truck manufacturer.
Paragraph 4.2.8 requires a spinner knob to be used with steering mechanisms that prevent road reactions to cause the steering wheel to spin where one handed operation is required and gives technical installation specifications.
Paragraph 4.2.9 allows the optional use of a spinner knob with steering mechanisms that prevent road reactions to cause the steering wheel to spin and gives technical installation specifications.
Similar paragraphs will likely be found in the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) publication CAN-B335-04, Safety Standard for Lift Trucks. People in other countries should consult their national engineering standard organization such as BSI, SAA, SNZ, etc. for similar publications.
With the exceptions of stand up operated forklifts designed for one hand operation and the accommodation of a counterbalanced truck for a disabled person, I can't think of a good reason for the use of a spinner knob. Controls for lift, tilt, side-shift, and automatic fork positioning, etc. should not be operated while the truck is in motion. Activities such as eating, drinking, using a radio, using a cell phone, etc. should also be prohibited while the truck is in motion. Both operator's hands, excluding the above exceptions, should be on the steering wheel while in motion.
Due to the poor lateral stability of forklifts (especially when not carrying a load), I would not recommend spinner knobs for normal use. I see spinner knobs as a prelude to a lateral overturn.
Also: Clark Material Handling Company on its web site specifically states Clark will not approve spinner knobs on hand steering wheels.
You should check with your truck manufacturer to see if they have a similar policy.
Installing a spinner knob without the manufacturer's approval poses a very real legal liability as you are making a modification to the truck which affects safety.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

<snip a lot of the small print>
The point is, the government has not made it illegal to have a suicide knob, barring a few restrictions for some commercial applications.
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