Which chisel?

Page 3 of 3  


Hmmm, I wouldn't have recommended getting a paring chisel for the first chisel - you can make paring cuts with a bench chisel, but it's usually not a good idea to pound on a paring chisel with a mallet.
Anyway, to remove the wood between the fingers, you basically go straight down with the chisel, going half way thru from one side and then from the other. Ideally your kerfs are precise, and if it's a half inch spacing then you use a half inch chisel In practice, if you're even a little narrow the chisel will bind, and you'll end up using a narrower one, then paring the sides to the right width. However, it's easier to keep every thing straight if there's some overlap (i.e. two cuts of 3/8 to make 1/2 rather than two of 1/4).
You can use a paring chisel, either hitting it with the butt of your hand, or gently with a mallet, but a bevel edge bench chisel would be the more suitable tool. You'll want to take out chips to make a V groove by first making a vertical cut on your line, then an angle cut in the waste, and repeating until you're close to the middle. Then turn over and do the same from the other side.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree. This jives with the U2B videos I've seen. I understand about the paring chisels. That why I bought a 1/4" paring chisel. It's that "going half way thru from one side and then from the other", chisel that I'm looking for. Heck, I'll go 3/8" fer a 1/2" joint, no problem. The U2B vid I watched also did that.

Thank you! Was that so hard? ;)
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, April 28, 2016 at 2:31:30 PM UTC-5, notbob wrote:

Then there is sharpening them to 15degrees rather than 25degrees.
I got mine from Ebay and wonder why I waited so long to get one (I now have 1/4, 3/8/, 1/2, and 3/4. Just watch what you are buying.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.