we discussed miter saw in length , but how about band saw?

Page 1 of 2  

So far I am doing O.K with only a circular and saber saw that I owned even before my woodworking interests, and it is not that bad. But of course i am thinking of upgrading. I resist the temtation to get a table saw, seems to me too big and specialized. But rather than thinking of miter saw which seem to me quite limited i am considering band saw. Does it make sense to have it as the main workhorse in you shop? thanks for any thought/comments
pawel
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pawel wrote:

wouldn't be w/o it; nor would I give up my band saw, or my miter saw. I debated a bit about getting a BS but now that I have it I can't imagine how I'd have progressed as a woodworker w/o it. Your needs may be more limited than mine, or others. buy what you need; not what others claim is important.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depending on the type of stuff you want to build. If you have a good bandsaw and a jointer(hand or power) you can do a lot without a table saw. However, if you start to take this hobby serious, a table saw in definitely in your future.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My bandsaws ( one cuts 6 high by 14 deep, and the other 16 high by 15 deep) and chop saw only have one advantage over my table saw, they can cut thicker stock. Well, I guess I can't do radius cuts on the TS. I can do all of the straight and miter cuts on the TS. If I did trim carpentry, then the compound miter cuts would require the chop saw. robo hippy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
robo hippy wrote:

difficult to cut out shapes on my TS... <g>
dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sure, it can make sense for a while. As others have said, though, if you really want to get seriously into woodworking, you'll eventually probably want a TS. I have only a bandsaw, handheld circular saw, and jigsaw due to space limitations right now, and of course they serve my needs, because that's what I have. The most important consideration is what kind of projects you'll be doing - cabinetwork would require a TS before some other things, for instance. My opinion is that a decent bandsaw is cheaper and safer than a decent tablesaw and takes up less space, so it's worth it especially when you're just starting out. Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave, I do some resawing, but the big bandsaw is used mostly for cutting out bowl blanks. It does a much neate job than the chainsaw does, and without the gas or risk. I have done resawing on the TS, mostly on boards 6 inches or less. robo hippy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
robo hippy wrote:

dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He flips the stock over keeping the same face against the fence.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Drackman wrote:

Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you own a bandsaw it is probably the wrong tool but if you only own a tablesaw it is a great tool.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Drackman wrote:

far as I know the term, means you are cutting many slices from one board, for example to make veneer, or as in my case to turn a 4/4 or 5/4 board into two thinner pieces for small projects. I wouldn't want to give up 1/8" or 3/32" to the blade. but that's just me.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dave you make a very good point...BUT honestly just how much "expensive" wood are you giving up... ? doing veneer work You bet I would use the band saw without a question... but to re saw a 8/4 piece of Walnut in half prior to dimensioning it I would run right to my Table saw.. 2 passes thru the jointer then the Planner will "loose" more expensive wood then I would loose with a 1/8 inch table saw blade... BUT your point is noted !
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you are a tool collector I am sure that you can justify buying a bandsaw so that you can save a few ounces of wood. I would not advise someone to purchase a bandsaw just to resaw a few boards. Resawing on the bandsaw takes more skill and setup time than on a tablesaw. As their skill grows they will probably be more interested in more complicated projects that might require a bandsaw but until then I recommend investing in wood, not shiny new tools.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

wonder HOW I lived without one.. *g*
It's sort of like software... you tend to use the program that you learned first for everything it will do, even if other programs will do it better...
I know a retired accountant that now works for a charity and writes many letters a day using Excel... I can't get him to even TRY word and gave up on him years ago.. *g*
Mac https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 09:18:17 -0800, mac davis

ROFL.
I work for an architectural firm. I asked one of our clients for any available as-built CAD drawings of their existing facitlity for a project we were doing.
Their Facilities Management person provided me with a floor plan; it was drawn in Excel. Yeah, really - don't ask me how they did this. It was, hands down, one of the funniest, most BIZARRE things I've ever seen.
- Matt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends I use the tablesaw to resaw up to 6 or so inch wide boards more then I do the bandsaw...its just faster ,,,
Bob G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Unisaw, it cuts 3 inches high, so 3 inches on one side, flip it over and cut 3 inches on the other, though I usually cut it about 1 1/2 inches at a time. I have done larger and then hand saw (the origional cordless power saw) the middle out. robo hippy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Practice, Grasshopper... you'll achieve perfection.. Mac https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hello,

Although it is true that you can get by with only a band saw (snip on all the goods of the Band Saw), I find a table saw Much easier, precise and simpler to setup and use than the band saw which require in my opinion much more skills than the BS.
so, unless you are already a proficient wood worker, I would strongly suggest that you start with the Table Saw (which you can find much cheaper than a BS), I used to have a $99 Rioby one that I finally upgraded after 4 years for a Rigid Cabinet maker (gosh, what a difference!), but you can find good table saw in the $300 range. the cheapest BS is the Harbor Freight one at $250 on sale + 60 for the raiser kit (you do WANT the raiser kit, trust me, regardless of the BS) and an other $70 for blades...
regards, cyrille
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.