tenon, back, dovetail, mitre hand saw

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"i guess that explains the lack of rust"
isn't a question, it's a supposition.

If a handsaw blade hasn't rusted, it's been treated well.
Quality cutting tools aren't made from stainless steel, primarily because of the poor edge.
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On Wed, 15 Apr 2015 16:25:55 GMT snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

or made in low O2 environment or lots of other possibilities since steel making is complicated and the issue is more complicated when you throw in something made long ago where the technique was only know by few people including the alloy's composition i.e. did they add special ingredients
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It's difficult to comprehend the sense of long run-on sentences.
It would help you to convey your information more successfully if you were to use basic grammar, capitalization and sentence structure when formulating your pronouncements.
It appears that you're suggesting that the formulation of steel used for cutting tools in the 20th century was some sort of mystery, which is pretty far from reality.
As Leon pointed out, even stainless can show corrosion effects.
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On Wed, 15 Apr 2015 17:49:24 GMT snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

give some data
tell us all what was used in the alloy for the silver steel saw the other post mentioned
include also how the saw was made using that silver steel
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It appears you are only participating in this thread in order to appear argumentative. I decline further participation.
Do your own research if you wish to learn the answers. I will point out that there is a wikipedia entry on silver steel that you may actually learn something from.
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snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote in writes:

I often wonder if people who write like that (and it's become distressingly common) also talk like that.
John
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On Wed, 08 Apr 2015 13:20:05 GMT snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

this is a good point I need to look at garage sales once in a while also flea markets
not everyone cares or even knows about ebay, bonanza, ecrater, etc.
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On Tue, 7 Apr 2015 13:02:16 -0400

but it turns in my favor because now I won't bother with a used saw i am looking new only

Yes I see some of these and might try one

just looking at oding dovetails for now

new ones aree cheaper I'm finding
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complain, complain, complain.
There are reasons that some "vintage" saws command higher prices, starting with the quality of the steel in the blade, the stiffness of the back (back/tenon/dovetail), the thickness and taper of the blade, the set, the tooth grind (rip, crosscut) and not to be discounted, appearance.
That said, for amateur dovetails, get a stanley dovetail saw from home depot or lowes for a few bucks; take a ball-peen hammer and an anvil (or the anvil on a bench vise) and carefully reduce the set, evenly on both sides. Don't remove the set entirely, but minimize it. Then test the saw in some end-grain; if it doesn't follow your line, the set is probably asymmetric and you'll need to adjust as necessary.
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On Tue, 07 Apr 2015 17:21:14 GMT snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

no confirmed observations you can check your self

have watched some videos on setting the saw it gets hard to do with higher number of points per inch need to break out the magnifier
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I have confirmed that you like to complain.

If you do as I suggested, you won't need a saw set. Just a hammer and a flat surface is sufficient to _reduce_ the set.
The set on mass-produced dovetail saws is excessive and generally uneven. It's pretty simple to reduce the set with a hammer.
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On Tue, 07 Apr 2015 18:36:21 GMT snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

no saw set mentioned only saw setting
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an important aspect of this
pull out your nearest 18 point saw and look at the set I can just make it out but to alter or reset or sharpen I'd definitely need magnification
that makes the jobs a lot harder for sure I'll have to rig something up to do this right
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