mitre saw

Hello,
Some years ago I bought a (hand) mitre saw from one of the DIY stores.
It allows you to cut any angle between -45 to 0 to +45 degrees: a 90
degree range. However, I would like to mitre some skirting board and
the wall is not straight so I think I require an obtuse angle. Are
there any mitre saws (hand or powered) that allow you to adjust the
angle over a wider, i.e. obtuse, range of angles?
Or is it a matter of marking the angle with a protractor and sawing it
freehand?
Is there a clever way to measure the angle required?
Thanks.
Reply to
Fred
I've got the Stanley mitre (hand) saw. It's pretty decent for small stuff, but more than one room for skirting would be too much I think. It has 8 preset angles, and is marked from 0 - 90 both ways, but getting it to cut at an angle between the presets is difficult/impossible as there is no lock on the bed between presets. I'm in the market for an electric saw myself now, so cannot comment on if they are infinitely adjustable.
Too much hard work that is. Keeping it at an angle, as well as straight down. I struggle to do that.
Combination square with a protractor , or a carpenters bevel.
Alan.
Reply to
A.Lee
=================================== Various angle finders:
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pencil marking the angle all round and use a pull saw for cutting.
Cic.
Reply to
Cicero
For internal corners there is much to be said for cutting one piece square, scribing the other and cutting to fit with a coping saw.
Reply to
newshound
Take a look at
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These can occasionally be picked up on E Bay and are a regular feature on the QVC DIY slot. I have only used mine for coving but the instructions say it can be used on skirtings.
HTH
John
Reply to
John
Following the wall is not a good idea IME. Cutting everything to 45 and back filling with plaster looks much neater in the end. Creates the illusion of straightness
Reply to
Stuart Noble
Hello.
Did you mean just filling behind the skirting board? Plastering the whole wall straight would be nice but very time consuming and I can't plaster well!
I suppose filling behind the board might work in my case but if you had really bad walls, I would think it would look quite strange if the board stuck out a lot from the wall at one end.
Reply to
Fred
No, I didn't mean that :-)
It doesn't actually, providing you level the filler well at the top of the skirting and have it the same colour as the wall. The eye tends to follow the back edge of the skirting. OTOH what stands out like a sore thumb is skirting that has been forced to follow the contours of the wall. As far as the angles go, 45 isn't a lot different to 40 or 50 providing the length at the back of the skirting is accurate. More mitres are "out" because of this than the actual angle.
Reply to
Stuart Noble
Not in a bay window it doesn't! Surely you don't "backfill" skirting board corners with plaster! As i said I have only used mine for coving and with excellent results, NO filling at the external corner 'points' or internal corner joints. I cannot speak too highly of the magic mitre saw for coving but I have no experience of skirting use, but if it is as good as with coving then buy, borrow, steal on.
HTH
John
Reply to
John
Same principle
Surely you don't "backfill" skirting board
Cut the angles to what they should be i.e. usually 67.5, and backfill. What else would you do?
Reply to
Stuart Noble
Now there lies the answer in the answer!! "usually 67.5" but not always! I refuse to get into a discussion whether 'my Dad is bigger than your Dad' but my coving is defiantly the BEST coving installation I have EVER seen. NO filling whatsoever on ANY of the corners both internal or external, which can only be put down to the Magic Mitre saw guide.
HTH
John
Reply to
John

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