Aldi sliding mitre saw review

A quick review - it's still in stock at £79.99.
Solidly built, all metal base, fast cutting, very clean cutting. Turntable has no position lock, but it doesn't need one due to the firm engagement of angular positions. What it's like if you're cutting an odd angle without a n indentation I don't know. Max cut length over 12", max cut depth 7.7cm. T he motor is angled upward giving welcome space, and the cutting head can ti lt in both directions (left & right) upto 45 degrees.
The cons:
The release whatsit that enables the head to go down is plastic. The saw wi ll work fine if it gets broken, but it wouldn't then be workplace legal. No t hard to fabricate one, but then you'd have a modified saw.
The turntable angle pointer is also plastic. It's only needed for odd angle cuts.
The laser points down the centre of the cut line, not down one edge.
The spring pushing the cutting head up is OTT. If you're using the saw a lo t it creates more fatigue than necessary.
Overall a good performing saw, but wouldn't say no to a few minor design po ints sorting.
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Two of the photos on the website show a locking knob ...
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On Thursday, 19 May 2016 21:58:10 UTC+1, Andy Burns wrote:

Site's detail view won't load. There are knobs I initally assumed were turntable lock, but turned out to be for the clamps.
I forgot to mention one other shortcoming. Clamp metalwork is chrome plated, making it difficult to clamp up without doing up all the screws on them first. My Rexon OTOH clamps fine with all the screws undone, a real time saver.
Also the Aldi has a split fence, which gives much more support than a traditional fixed 1 piece fence.
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The black knob at the front?
<https://cdn.aldi-digital.co.uk/Double-Bevel-Sliding-Mitre-Saw-C.jpg?o=GTiBqiRJV8DRE18sw3hnRjf7GX0j&V=tIZ3&wH0&h `0&p=2&qw>
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On Friday, 20 May 2016 11:02:01 UTC+1, Andy Burns wrote:

It's not here now for me to look at. All I can say is that's a long way from anywhere where moving turntable meets stationary base.
NT
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On Thu, 19 May 2016 13:40:39 -0700, tabbypurr wrote:

A couple of years ago, somebody here recommended the Evolution saws.
£100 at Screwfix, but there's always B- and C-grade on eBay from their official outlet store.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/112000231085
The B-grade I bought has stood up very, VERY well to reasonably heavy domestic use - the "B-gradeness" of it seemed to be an ex-display model, with a couple of holes drilled in the legs to secure it. The blade was brand new, and there were no other signs of use.
Gotta be a better bet than an Aldidl one with some design problems.
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On 5/20/2016 8:09 AM, Adrian wrote:

Glad you posted that, I have one of these too and was thinking exactly the same thing. The Evolution blade will also cut aluminium and steel, very useful (but you get sprayed with sharp chips). Very good for cutting dexion. Mine is out on loan to one of the kids at the moment so not sure of the model. The knob for locking the turntable angle has come adrift from the screw although you can still tighten it, I will need to pin and/or glue it when it comes home.
I think I bought a medium sized one (210 mm?), there were larger and smaller when I bought mine. No sign at all of "wear" on my B grade, I guess I might find that the knob has already been glued back before.
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Which dexion are you talking about, the roughly 5x3" angle with very large holes in it for bolts, or the 25mm square black slotted tube with knock in corners ?

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On Saturday, 21 May 2016 07:18:35 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

I've never seen Dexion that size
NT
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On Sat, 21 May 2016 02:12:05 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Nor me. 25mm square black (unslottted) tube with knock in joints sounds more like (Dexion) Speedframe?
Cheers, T i m
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Yes. Made some speaker stands from it. They once did a smaller version (20mm?) in matt chrome.
I use an angle grinder in a stand with steel cutting disc to cut it. I've use my sliding saw to cut ally - not sure I'd want to risk an expensive blade on steel. Even one which claims to cut it. ;-)
My local Dexion stockist is no more. Now a block of expensive flats. ;-)
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On Sat, 21 May 2016 12:09:24 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

I built an electric racing 'motorbike' from it (that used to be my bench at work). ;-)
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/5772409/EV1.jpg

Not seen that.

I used a hacksaw when building the EV.

I (now) have a steel cutting bandsaw and one of those big bench grinding disk type cutters (loads of sparks though).

I'm not surprised. Who (outside us here) builds anything these days, even benches or racking. ;-(
Even kids construction sets are just kits for specific models. When I had Lego and Meccano I don't think I ever got any instructions with it ... and didn't need any. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On Sat, 21 May 2016 12:33:44 +0100, T i m wrote:

I had some Dexion 'clone' delivered two days ago. For some racking I want to build.
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I still have a few Dexion based racks and possibly some Dexion metal draws that suit.
The bench in my workshop I built (4 welded frames bolted to the longitudinals and braces) from scratch using some fairly heavy angle because I wanted something that I could bolt a big vise to and would take a thump and not move etc.
Cheers, T i m
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wrote:

I use a 10" hand held circular saw in my own cutoff saw stand with a steel cutting disk to cut it but I was asking if he uses that other blade to do that.
I now have 3 dedicate cutoff saws which is handy because the switch in that circular saw that I used to build the house with has now died.

Yeah, that's what I have done so far but was wondering if he found it works fine so it might be worth trying myself.
The steel cutting disk isnt perfect in the sense that you do get a bit of flange of steel that you need to trim with an angle grinder after cutting it and I've always had some reservations about what it would be like if the disk comes apart in use. Not that I have ever had one fail.

I can't find anyone local selling the dexion slotted tube anymore and was considering importing a pack or two of it.
I got one when I was building the house and have now used it all for shelving and need to do some more, mainly for full floor to ceiling bookshelves covering an entire quite large wall.
I should really just guillotine the spines off in a massive great hydraulic guillotine and use a decent scanner to turn all the books into ebooks but that seems a tad gung ho even for me.
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On Saturday, 21 May 2016 21:54:48 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

Wood works better for that sort of thing.

I wouldn't be surprised if most titles have been OCRed already.
NT
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Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely rigid vertical frames that support the shelves, nothing like as easy to have slots every 25mm so you can adjust the shelf spacing to minimise the waste of space vertically.

Trouble is the prices that Amazon wants for them. They are almost entirely books that I have got from garage/yard sales, mostly for 50c, sometimes for $1 each. Amazon wants at least $10 for most of them, plenty of them it wants a lot more than that. I don’t buy fiction much at all anymore, that's almost exclusively non fiction and I have thousands of them quite literally.
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On Sunday, 22 May 2016 02:10:49 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

no issue there with wood framing

wood shelving is infinitely adjustable.
Could you just get something right for once in your idiot life?
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MUCH easier to do with slotted steel tube.

But not as easily as moving what is in the slot.
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On Sunday, 22 May 2016 20:09:32 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

is it?

A screw versus a bolt. The main upside of timber framed shelving is that yo u can make it the exact size and if necessary shape of wherever it's going, in all 3 dimensions. It also looks much better in a home than dexion. And finally it's much more versatile and easy to add features onto, something t hat's seldom done with steel because it's a pig to do.
NT
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