Sawstop Cabinet Saw

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If the Sawstop turns out to be good, reliable technology, I suspect you will see others try it in the future. My biggest concern is they are going to get the Government involved and we will have another safety feature legislated down our throats. From what I read, that is already in process.
On the other hand, it seems to be a pretty good safety feature. Most of us think we are safe in the shop. I was telling my wife about my 30-year safety record a few years ago - about a week before I went to the emergency room.
RonN

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For the greater part, most will agree it's a good technology. The biggest uproar about the SawStop is the attempt to make it a mandated safety technology.

It may happen, but it probably won't get that far because insurance concerns will likely cause most businesses to adopt the technology anyway.
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On Sun, 26 Nov 2006 10:07:29 -0600, RonB wrote:

Not likely until the Sawstop patents expire. He approached the major manufacturers and was rejected by all of them.

He tried to get laws passed that would require his device on all saws. The government told him to go to Hell.

--
--John
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LOL.. A little interpretation on your part?
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On Sun, 26 Nov 2006 18:01:17 +0000, Leon wrote:

Well, he didn't get what he wanted.
--
--John
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Perhaps not the obvious but her certainly got a lot of recognition. Cheap advertising.
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<...snipped...>

If he had hired Jack Abramhoff all new saws would be using it now.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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On Sun, 26 Nov 2006 17:02:10 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

If he'd hired Jack Abramhoff, all of the federal prison system wooddorking shops would have one now.
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Those that think that they are immune are typically the most likely to get hurt. Until you realize that you do not have total control you are kinda going in blind.
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Absolutely correct! I made a stupid assumption that when you turn the switch off the TS blade stops. Walked away, realized I had left a cutoff sitting on the tabletop. Over-reached the blade and ^%#&$.
RonB
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I kinda had the same situation. The saw had been turned off and I lost 1/2 my thumb. Accidents and lapse of judgment are can happen to anyone. I was one of those silly people that thought that after 12 years of serious woodworking that it could not happen to meeeee. Now after about 30 years I realize more and more the possibilities. And a guard would not have prevented my accident although I still do not use one. Guards so not cover ever scenario.
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[schnipfered]

You get better results by flicking the lever to "single shot" from "automatic". Holds true when firing a machine gun. One shot on target, as opposed to 30 misses. What does that have to do with woodworking? If every action is treated like THAT one will be the one that will hurt you, then the utmost care in execution will be exercised. It's about never letting your guard down. It is about eye-contact, when coming close to a sawblade, or the asshole in the oncoming car who has his blinker out but doesn't make the turn...eye-contact stops accidents. I want to think about each movement. I do not want to become careless, because some (SawStop)machine/guard is supposed to protect me. I want to see the blade that can hurt me.
One accident that may have been prevented by the SawStop, will not change the odds for an accident elsewhere in the shop. In fact, I think that unit may build a false sense of safety which may be carried over to the shaper (really should have a power feeder), drill press and radial arm saw..or a jointer.. now there's nasty piece of gear. I DO want a guard on that. (You don't sew a part-finger back on after a jointer takes it off.)
r
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wrote:

Agreed. Unfortunately a guard can lead to the same false since of security. I too prefer to see the blade. Being alert is key but after a long day alertness can diminish.
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Gotta Witness!
Absolutely Freakin' Amen, Robbie!
That was exactly my point in the previous threads about this weiner wacking wonder. (Did they test them on Nathan's Kosher All Beef?)
There is a damned fine book by David Pye called, The Nature And Art Of Workmanship, that delineates craftsman made products as being made under the rubric of The Workmanship Of Risk, and production made products as being made under that of, The Workmanship Of Certainty.
Pye was actually talking about the methods used in the small shop v. those used in production, and their result in the arena of design, but he may as well have been talking about the level of risk in one shop v. another.
The only employee that I ever had get hurt did it on the jointer.
I'm personally scared to death by the shaper and use any contrivance possible to keep my hands away from the cutterhead.
I can see SawStop being implemented through OSHA in production shops, once the bugs have been ironed out.
Right now, you are asking a shop owner to carry replacement cartridges for a unit that has not undergone adequate market testing, that costs a substantial percentage of the original cost of the saw.
Take the airbag, please.
If you have an event that requires the deployment of the airbag(s), the replacement cost is generally less than ten percent of the cost of the vehicle. The level of false positives is less than 0.05%. This is most often covered by insurance.
SawStop is more than double that, and market reports show that false positives are in an unacceptable range. I am not aware of any insurance program that covers the cost.
Maybe we should have freaking airbags on our saws that pop out of the blade guard and knock our fingers away. It won't fry the saw and you'll have a nice sack to store your oddments in.
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Tom Watson wrote:

You're confusing me, Tom. If you're saying that the cost of a replacement cartridge and a sawblade are over 20% of the cost of the Sawstop, you're wrong. Last time I looked, cartridges cost $60 and sawblades shouldn't be over $140. That's $200 out of a saw/blade cost of $3600 or more. or roughly 5.5% or less.
If you're implying that the Sawstop costs over 20% of a comparable saw without the safety features, that's open to interpretation. Because of the load the safety feature puts on the saw, many of the components are much heavier duty than on other saws. You can attribute that to the safety in which case you're right, or you can say you're getting much more saw than others, in which case you're wrong.
BTW, if the offer hasn't ended, Sawstop will send you a new cartridge for free if you return the fired one -they're collecting data. That could end at any time, of course. -- It's turtles, all the way down
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Robatoy wrote:

grinder.
DAMHIKT
Bill
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wrote:

Hey, new product! GrinderStop!
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Oh yes, once that jointer gets through, your finger is going to be thinly sliced and spread over a wide area. But what's next? Do they start making JointerStop and DrillPressStop? Hey, why not go for HammerStop so you don't hit your thumb?
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No they are going straight to the IdiotStop. It will read your mind and stop you from going near any machinery that you are overly confident about using.
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Leon wrote:

I will e-mail you my address, so you can send me a new keyboard. You just couldn't wait till I finished with my coffee, huh?
r
I am envisioning one of those boxing gloves on the end of an articulated accordion style expandable arm, like the ones which punch out cartoon characters. Install it at the shop door. Upon entering, it will ask a series of questions. The second it detects attitude, it punches you in the face and slams the door shut. IdiotStop... I think you've got something there. *still laughing*
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