RE: Squaring Rough Lumber

Page 7 of 7  
"Puckdropper" wrote
Could you elaborate a bit on that technique? My technique is pretty much home schooled as well, and I'd like to try to improve it.

The biggest problem I see is people pushing down on the lumber on the infeed side. Once there is a few inches on the outfeed table, put all the pressure on the outfeed.
-- Jim in NC
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"Morgans" wrote:

The dedicated jointer paddle complete with hook cleat on it's aft end addresses this issue directly.
Lew
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Oh so much for winding sticks, adze and broad axe.
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On Fri, 17 Jun 2011 08:58:01 -0700 (PDT), beecrofter

Hey, hey, hey! You can't call 'em "broads" any more. Watch it.
-- Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony. -- Mahatma Gandhi
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Plane one side flat with a #5, 6, 7, or 8 jack, fore, or jointer, cupped or bowed side down, shims underneath to support the board if necessary. Check for twist with a pair of winding sticks. Use a scratch gauge to establish the opposite side, then plane until the iron just splits the scratch lines.
For the edges, plane one edge straight, though not necessarily square to the adjacent faces. You only need a straight corner to run against the table saw fence. Rip the opposite side an eighth or so over, then turn the board and rip the planed, though not necessarily square edge true.
If the iron was sharp, you're done. The guy with the power jointer and planer now gets to sand, using 80 or 100 grit to remove the washboard marks and succeeding grits up to 220 to remove the scratch marks from the coarser grits.
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