Re: Do you support educational vouchers in schools?

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snipped-for-privacy@odds.stat.purdue.edu (Herman Rubin) wrote:

The quotes provided show that the purpose was much broader than that, and in fact that the state had an interest in education independent of any that they church might have had.

How about for girls?
Since I've been doing lots of census research lately, I will now grab a random page in the lower south East of NYC from 1900, where immigrant Jews predominated, and look at the literacy. I'm being selective only to choose a page that is mostly Jewish, and mostly not native-born, rather than Irish or some other ethnicity, so as to get a meaningful sample. I am excluding those under age 10 and those listed as being in school. I will then continue until I get 100 data points
Manhattan 1900 Census District 288 page 1-3 and part of 4.
yes Male 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111 40 Female 111111111111111111111111 24 64 No male 1111111111 10 female 11111111111111111111111111 26 36
Conveniently (I didn't plan it that way) the population split equally by gender. I see 80% literacy in men, 48% literacy in women. Neither an especially bragworthy figure among a population for which "universal literacy" has been mandatory for 2500 years.
Indeed, while I did not collect numbers, an age breakdown would have given significantly lower literacy numbers among those over 40 or those over 50 - those in their teens and twenties were almost universally literate, perhaps because most of them had some schooling after they arrived here, and NYC had compulsory education to some level (I'm not sure what) in those days.
And that is just basic literacy, not competency in what you consider fundamental math concepts. I believe you have already noted your parents' lack of sufficient to even point you in the right direction in your own education.
lojbab
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Did Martin Luther include the girls? Possibly.
Teaching girls was not prohibited, but was not common in Judaism at that time. One reason was that the teachers were men, and the Jewish modesty rules made it quite difficult. It was even a problem for mothers to drop off their sons at school. However, some rabbis taught their daughters, and they in turn taught other girls.
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<>> wrote: <>>>>"Bob LeChevalier"> wrote
            .................
<>But public education was present in many societies before <>this; as far as can be told, universal literacy for boys <>became almost mandatory in Judaism 2500 years ago.>How about for girls?>Since I've been doing lots of census research lately, I will now grab

Literacy in what? Did they count literacy in Yiddish or Hebrew?
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snipped-for-privacy@odds.stat.purdue.edu (Herman Rubin) wrote:

I believe that the question asked was "can you read?" or "can you write?" Separate questions asked what their primary language was and whether they could speak English. I'd have to go back to check the specific people, but I'm pretty sure that there were people who did not speak English who were listed as able to read and write.
lojbab
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