Plumber's tape needed?

Page 2 of 5  


LOL -- I meant, as opposed to getting it on any other parts of the male fitting. But I guess I didn't make that too clear, did I?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I got a kick out of that. I was picturing the process of pushing the tape into the threads with out pulling it out. LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's called a "male pipe thread".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Jul 2009 02:00:54 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I use teflon tape, double wrapped in a clockwise direction and do not cover the entry thread. Carefully used, the tape will take up the slop in the threads and provide a better seal, while not allowing the metal to metal joint to seize.
I don't have my Machinery's Handbook in front of me but, if you refer to it, you will find that there are a number of interference fit thread engagement tolerances and what we too often get in offshore fittings is a slop tolerance that is really more than it should be.
Pipe dope comes in flavors (caustic, pneumatic, hydraulic, etc) and I think there is more chance for contamination because the wet surface can attract gunk in what is often a dusty environment - and because I'm more capable of keeping the entry thread clean with the tape.
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think you need some kind of sealant. I have used teflon tape on mine.
Interesting discussion here
http://www.homerepairforum.com/forum/plumbing/4149-teflon-tape-liquid-thread-sealant.html
Luigi
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------010205010302040409080108 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
I always put a dab of dope in the female part, and wrap the male part with tape STARTING at about the 2nd. or 3rd. thread back from the end. Keeps the tape out of the system, and those first couple of threads don't do much anyway on tapered pipe fittings.
Upscale wrote:

--------------010205010302040409080108 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#990000"> <font size="+1"><font face="Arial Rounded MT Bold">I always put a dab of dope in the female part, and wrap the male part with tape STARTING at about the 2nd. or 3rd. thread back from the end.&nbsp;&nbsp; Keeps the tape out of the system, and those first couple of threads don't do much anyway on tapered pipe fittings.</font></font><br> <br> Upscale wrote: <blockquote cite="mid:1007d$4a53f317$cef88bc5$ snipped-for-privacy@TEKSAVVY.COM" type="cite"> <pre wrap="">I've just picked up a new portable compressor, hose and an array of fittings ~ all connections will be brass to brass. Do I need plumber's tape for these fittings or should I be fine with just the brass to brass? I was wondering what others have done?
Thanks.
</pre> </blockquote> </body> </html>
--------------010205010302040409080108--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not recommended. Every bottle of pipe dope I've ever seen says to apply to male threads only -- that's to keep the dope on the threads, and out of the opening.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use the "gas" rated Teflon tape. It is thicker and easier to deal with, and it is identified by it's yellow color.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ok, that's enough information for me. I've used Teflon tape on plumbing joints before, so I'll pick up some of the yellow version. Just for interest's sake, I bought the Dewalt D55141 compressor you told me about. Haven't run it yet because I was waiting for an order of hose and fittings to come in which just did. I'll pick up the tape this weekend and let you know how loud this 85db compressor sounds compared to the old one that I'm giving to a friend.
Do you know if the yellow version tape will do double duty on regular plumbing fixtures? ~ not a money thing, just a convenience if it will work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IIRC, the purpose of the tape is to force the threads together more tightly.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scott Lurndal wrote: ...

How would possibly physically do that being so soft as compared to metal?
What it does is simply fill voids as does pipe dope in a more convenient form factor...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

it acts to reduce friction, thus allowing more torque to be applied to the joint, thus allowing it to be tighter.

it does that too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
charlie wrote:

That's certainly secondary unless old, rusty threads and still not the actual design purpose...

That's the primary function and mode of operation...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Memory confirmed by Wikipedia:
One of the defining characteristics of PTFE is how good it is at defeating friction. The use of PTFE tape in tapered pipe threads performs a lubricating function, which more easily allows the threads to be screwed together, to the point of deformation, which is what creates the majority, if not all, of the seal.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08 Jul 2009 20:49:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

likely to be dissapointed. PTFE is PRIMARILY a lubricant.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Yes, it works on regular plumbing, it is thicker and takes less.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Found this on-line:
TEFLON TAPE:
When PTFE (Teflon) tape first became available they only made it in the common single density type, which we commonly find in the hardware and home supply stores. Later they began making a double density version, which was twice as thick. Many state and local codes then adopted the double density type as mandatory when making connections for natural gas however since both products were the same color (white) it was difficult for inspectors to be sure which product had been used. PTFE tape is now made in numerous varieties and they have issued a color standard to determine which type should be used.
WHITE-Single density- should only be used on NPT threads up to 3/8 inch. YELLOW- Double Density- yellow double density is often labeled as "Gas type" RED-Triple Density: (Note-the container is red but the tape itself appears as a pale pink color). Presently required on all joints " diameter or greater. GREEN- Oil Free PTFE tape- Required for use on all lines conveying oxygen (I.E. medical oxygen or welding oxygen lines). COPPER COLOR- contains granules of copper and is to be used as a thread lubricant but is not approved as a thread sealant. (Generally it is used as a thread lubricant on bolts or pipe threads for mechanical applications where no physical seal is required.)
PTFE tape is only approved as a thread seal when applied correctly. To apply you begin at the end of the pipe and wrap the tape under tension in the direction of the thread turns. Each successive layer should overlap the previous layer by to 2/3 and continue wrapping until the entire threaded portion of the pipe is covered. (Minimum of 3 full turns).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually I have found the White in at least 2 densitys. I have seen some that is so thin that it is difficult to work with, like plastic wrap used for food storage. I now buy Yellow so that I do not have to wonder if I am getting the thicker easier to manage White tape or the very thin stuff. The thin Teflon tape is usually packaged with products like new water faucets.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.