Plumber's tape needed?

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I've just picked up a new portable compressor, hose and an array of fittings ~ all connections will be brass to brass. Do I need plumber's tape for these fittings or should I be fine with just the brass to brass? I was wondering what others have done?
Thanks.
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Oh yeah...teflon tape definately...actually makes tightening them a bit smoother, also helps makes the connection air tight.
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"Upscale" wrote:

If you are referring to teflon tape, avoid it like the plague.
You want teflon paste.
Yes, you want to seal the thread connections.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I've successfully used teflon tape on a gazillion brass, plated-brass and steel compressed gas fittings, from a couple of hundred psi all the way up to several thousand. It can cause problems when it is improperly applied, e.g. bits of it are carried into the system. But anything can cause problems when it is improperly applied. I wouldn't hesitate to use teflon tape on compressor fittings.
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Any difference between plumber's dope and gasline dope?
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"Father Haskell" wrote:

These days Teflon paste serves both applications.
Lew
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I don't think you can get high huffing PTFE. ;)
nb
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wrote:

Contrary to Lew's experience, I get better results wrt leakfree joints using the tape than I do with the paste. YMMV, but some sort of sealant should be used.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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"Tom Veatch" wrote:

You NEVER want to use Teflon tape on combustion plumbing.
Sooner or later, bits of the tape will break free and end up plugging the combustion orifices.
A principle of mine was paid in excess of $10,000 for a service call to a refinery for a piece of combustion equipment they had sold that the refinery installed.
Emergency travel, weekend service rates, car rentals, etc, etc, all to discover a plugged orifice from Teflon tape.
It was rookie mistake by a refinery worker.
Less than 15 minutes to solve the problem, but still had a $10,000 invoice to pay.
Lew
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On Wed, 08 Jul 2009 02:13:47 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

I certainly can't fault your advice other than to mention that combustion plumbing is a little outside the scope of the OP's question. Which, if I read correctly, involves plumbing for compressed air.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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"Tom Veatch" wrote:

A mater of standardization.
If you are going to need Teflon paste for some possible applications, why not use it for all?
Can't be cost, a bottle of Teflon paste is only a couple of bucks.
And unless you are a pipe fitter or a plumber, a small bottle is probably a multi year supply.
Lew
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For starters, it is messy compared to Teflon tape. IIRC it stays messy and does not completely dry.
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.....which means it's easily removed with a wire brush. The same can't be said of tape.
nb
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Tape is easily removed, usually, without a wire brush. Just unwrap it.
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TFE can become tiny parts. It will clog gas gets and kill those inside.
Thus the hot water heater if gas - use plumbing gunk to lock it up.
Plasma torches and the like have small holes - as do paint guns and the like.
Martin
Lew Hodgett wrote:

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We're talking about a home workshop and compressed air, not a freaking refinery!
I use tape. Never had a problem, but if I did it would not be a $10,000 fix. More like $1 - $10.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

FWIW, there is tape that is code for gas piping. It's a bit heavier than that used for water piping, presumably to address the breaking free and plugging orifices issue.

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Well, you need *some* kind of pipe dope in there, if you think you'll ever want to take the joint apart a few years down the road. Some folks will tell you never to use teflon tape with compressed air, but I've never had a problem. Just make sure you apply the tape to the male threads only, and keep it on the threads -- don't get any into the air passages.
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wrote:

Just curious, have you seen any one apply tape to the female threads???
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