Planes

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Hmmmm. If the plane's dull and your foot's not on the lower step, maybe. Or maybe you have to be my mass to do the the trick?
"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

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No, I don't think putting any amount of weight on the lower step will help. The frame just isn't rigid against side-to-side racking. The step might be stable, but the top will be waving about. It's a bit more rigid front-to-back, so they are usable for sawing.
A Workmate is also too short for many planing jobs.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Well, not at my house.
wrote:

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up. Like, get the sole flat, sharpen the blade, and so forth. The best method is go to a junk business and try to find a thick piece of glass, large enough for the size of two sheets of sandpaper. Buy four grits, 80, 220, 400, 800, and buy a can of 3M Super 77 at any hardware or crafts store. Also try and find a cheap honing guide to hold chisels and plane blades (an actual "must").
Layout newspaper, sandpaper face down and spray the back lightly* and even, then lay it on the glass square and flat. Cover the glass with the sandpaper. You can use flat marble too, I have both but I use the marble for chisels only because the glass has much more integrity for flatness, doesn't matter as much for chisels. The glass should be at least 1/2" thick but it is somewhat expensive to buy new. Junk shop.
Disassemble the plane and clean all parts thoroughly without wrecking the finish, dry it all thoroughly as well or it will rust easily.
Start with 80 grit until the whole sole is flat, then remove rough grit marks progressively with finer grits. Once the sandpaper is spent, clogged, useless, peel it off and use paint thinner and paper towels to clean the surface, and apply new sandpaper when dry. If adhesive is left dry on the surface and new paper is applied it will result in an uneven surface of hills and valleys.
Sand the sole of the plane body without applying too much pressure in favor of any specific area of the sole, do this until the whole sole is shiny. One way to see when it is all totally flat, use an ink marker and scribble across the sole, as it flattens the ink will disappear. Also do the same for the outside_sides of the plane body, the reason is to square the sole to the sides. For this purpose you will need a square, so you can test it from time to time with a lamp to shine through.
You can do the same for the face of the "frog", sanding around the "nib" that is part of the "Y" Adjusting Lever, see graphic of plane parts: http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan1.htm it sticks out from the face of the frog. Don't sand on it. But, you can do this job lightly until there is no unevenness of the face.
After all that work, sharpen the blade using the scary sharp method with the surface, sandpaper and the honing guide. Start with 220 grit until a new bevel is just* ground on, then go to 400 and then 800, you could as far as 1200 so that cutting edge becomes like glass. Don't grind too fast and hard, or uneven or you'll ruin the squareness of the cutting edge to the sides, vital! If that edge_to_sides is already out_ of_square you'll need to use a file_to_square_it, right straight on that cutting edge, then do the honing. When I have found that, I hold the blade down and the off an edge of the work area and file away. It doesn't take long, a vise would help good but use wood. Also test with a square.
Reassemble and enjoy planing, no matter what company made the damn thing! When planing, find the grain of the wood where it travels in direction upwards and follow it that way, don't go against the grain. When setting the blade it must stick out of the mouth just_BARELY, and not skewed to either side.
If you want good chisels to learn with, I suggest Stanley 200 series, great quality and really low prices. Wooden mallet. Enjoy!
Alex
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Alex, please have a go at re-typing this sentence. I think you editted out a word or two. I didn't follow it. I really want to understand how you were suggesting the use of a file.
Thanks, Bob
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like, cutting edge is convex, or rounded outwards like a scrub plane blade. I hold down the whole blade with my left hand an then, straight into the cutting edge, I file it flat_to_square. So that all three sides are squared. Sides to cutting edge and cutting edge to sides. Does that make sense now? Let me know.
Alex
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Thanks for making the effort. So when you are done with the file, there is basically no beveled edge or very little left and then you re-establish the bevel with sharpening?
Bob
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For that much flat on the cutting edge I will use 100 grit to re-establish the bevel.
Alex
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 20:13:35 -0000, "Sam Berlyn"

For new planes, give Steve Knight a peek: www.KnightToolworks.com or go hunting on Ebay, where most of my metal planes originated. Old Stanley planes go for $20 or less on good days.
Also, I managed to get a cheaparse Indian import plane (like HF's $9.99 junker) to cut like a dream for a few feet. Once I had learned how to properly ScarySharpen(tm) the blade AND how to set it very fine, so it took less of a bite in the wood, it worked much, much better. I soon found out that I -used- to think of as "sharp" was actually more like "dull as nails."
My test for sharpness: Set the iron on my thumbnail vertically. Using no downward pressure, I try to move the iron up my nail toward the thumb. It should scrape a fine shaving, and i should have felt it cut gently into the nail as I let it down. (Once you have really thin thumbnails, move on to other fingernails.)
__=__ thumbnail m / \ o ================ iron v | | e ------- | | | | | thumb | | | v
---------------------------------------------------------------- * OPERA: A Latin word * Wondrous Website Design * meaning * Save your Heirloom Photos * "death by music" * http://www.diversify.com ----------------------------------------------------------------
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 20:13:35 -0000, "Sam Berlyn"

Hello again Sam,
I've got a old Bailey plane that I found down in my dad's basement, all covered in rust. I couldn't get the thing to work no matter what I did, even though I read every article I could find, and spent hour after hour trying different things. I figured it was just a peice of junk, and I wanted to toss it out and buy a new one. But then I took a woodworking class (in your case, you may want to just find a teacher or friend who knows how to do it) and the instructor showed me how to set it up and use it properly in about 25 minutes. Now it works great! Sometimes what you need isn't a new tool- it's just a helping hand from someone who is in the same room with you to show you how it all works.
Good Luck!
Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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