OT: Somebody's got some 'splaning to do

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Paper clip. Maybe. Most other stuff is found in Nature. Including the arch.
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"I'm the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo ..."


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Not a first but an accomplishment using matirieals and construction techniques of the time.

Wing warping had been used before but had not been patented. The Wright Bros. patended it.

The engine they built was their most notable achievement.
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On Thu, 14 Apr 2011 07:40:08 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

The engineering to achieve heavier than air power flight, but wing warping with the rudder was the "invention" that made controlling the aircraft attitude easier.
Mark
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@hotmail.com says...

I guess robatwit thinks that some ancient Chinese put a man on the Moon. After all, that ancient Chinese had a working rocket.
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.com...
And THIS is what you do and what makes you so disliked around here: you assume to know what it is somebody thinks. Sir, in my case, you neither have the ability nor the capacity.
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On Fri, 15 Apr 2011 06:33:21 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

The rest of us have him twit filtered. Why don't you? If you dislike him so much, why are you replying to his trolls? DFTFT PHAFH
-- Some people hear voices. Some see invisible people. Others have no imagination whatsoever.
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Can't speak for Burma, but we most certainly DO use the metric system in the USA. (Though not for everything of course)
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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Some of the scienterrific equipment that we work with uses both metric and imperial. For example many of our high pressure pumps have settings for milliliters per minute flow and PSI for pressure. The German made pumps use Torr for pressure. From casual conversations with other techs, flow and volumes are easily understood unsing liters, etc but pressure is still pounds per square inch. Lengths are metric unless it's shelving or furniture or "how far is the bathroom from your lab" type comment. Marc (who wonders how boring life would have been if we always used metric. Think how unemotional the cliche "Give him and inch and he'll take a mile" would be if it were converted to metric?)
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Larry W wrote the following:

Science and military. Oh, and one more thing, large soda bottles.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

the metric measure being the standard.
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On Mon, 11 Apr 2011 15:35:02 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

We're BI here. Newbies are all metricated, oldsters are all SAE, some of us are using both: whatever method works whenever.
-- If you're looking for the key to the Universe, I've got some good news and some bad news.
The bad news: There is no key to the Universe.
The good news: It was never locked. --Swami Beyondananda
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In article

I didn't know Antarctica was a country...
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On Apr 12, 12:37am, Dave Balderstone

I am also reasonably certain it isn't as big as it appears in that global projection...whatever projection that might be.
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wrote:

I am also reasonably certain it isn't as big as it appears in that global projection...whatever projection that might be.
**********************
It certainly looks big, but that is because the image is a flat image of a globe, thus making the Antarctic appear large But, I thought that Antarctica was a Continent, owned by no one in particular, but inhabited by several nations.
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I was somewwhat surpirsed at the continued use of English, US and Spanish customary units in Central America, despite the official "metric" status.
Belize still sells gas in real gallons and speed limits are in mph while Guatemala and Panama sell gas in puny gallons. Woodworkers everywhere use pulgadas (inches) and centimetros, and most tape measures I saw in hardware stores had both inches and centimetres. In Cuba, I guy a talked to mentioned needing 2 pulgada nails for the house he was building.
Central Americans also use a Spanish yard, known as a vara. In Costa Rica, their eminently droolable-over wood is sold by the "pulgada", which is one nominal pulgada (inch) by one inch by four varas long. It's a little less than a board-foot. $3.00 per pulgada at the sawmill for some incredible tropical hardwoods. I gotta figure out a way of bringing back a container load or two.
In Italy, my plumber cousin measures his pipe diameters in inches, but the lengths are in metres and centimetres. In France, where the whole metric thing started, one does not order 500 grams of whaterver food at the butcher or grocer, but "une livre", a pound of whatever. In Canada, our residential construction is still in inches and feet. The attempt to hard convert plywood and to move to a 100mm module instead of 4 inches failed in the early 80s.
And let's not forget the US was the first country to implement a metric currency, in 1792. They replaced the old "reales" or bits -- 1/8 of a Peso or Dollar -- with cents.
Luigi
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wrote:

I was somewwhat surpirsed at the continued use of English, US and Spanish customary units in Central America, despite the official "metric" status.
Belize still sells gas in real gallons and speed limits are in mph while Guatemala and Panama sell gas in puny gallons. Woodworkers everywhere use pulgadas (inches) and centimetros, and most tape measures I saw in hardware stores had both inches and centimetres. In Cuba, I guy a talked to mentioned needing 2 pulgada nails for the house he was building.
Central Americans also use a Spanish yard, known as a vara. In Costa Rica, their eminently droolable-over wood is sold by the "pulgada", which is one nominal pulgada (inch) by one inch by four varas long. It's a little less than a board-foot. $3.00 per pulgada at the sawmill for some incredible tropical hardwoods. I gotta figure out a way of bringing back a container load or two.
In Italy, my plumber cousin measures his pipe diameters in inches, but the lengths are in metres and centimetres. In France, where the whole metric thing started, one does not order 500 grams of whaterver food at the butcher or grocer, but "une livre", a pound of whatever. In Canada, our residential construction is still in inches and feet. The attempt to hard convert plywood and to move to a 100mm module instead of 4 inches failed in the early 80s.
And let's not forget the US was the first country to implement a metric currency, in 1792. They replaced the old "reales" or bits -- 1/8 of a Peso or Dollar -- with cents.
With the metric system restraint is suggested. Using Imperial is better in many instances.
Imagine a metric clock Imagine stumping a toe on your meter. Imagine the casualties when upping the speed limit from 70 MPH to 112 KMPH. Imagine the waste in time enunciating a metric measurement.
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On 4/12/11 9:10 AM, Leon wrote:

limits, highways went from 60 MPH to 100 KPH.
Maybe if gas in the US was sold by the liter Lew would feel better about the prices. :-)
--
Froz...


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1.65/liter (In Wageningen, Netherlands, on 4/12/2011 at a Shell station, according to its web site: <http://www.goedkooptanken.nu/tankstations/shell-express-wageningen_6348/ )
1=$1.44 1 gal=3.8 L 1.65*1.44*3.8=$9.00/US gallon
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Best regards
Han
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wrote:

Ackshally, the Autoroutes in Quebec did have 70 mph speed limits in the early 1970s when I learned to drive, but they brought them down to 60 in the late 70s, before they got turned to kilometres.
Luigi
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On 4/12/11 10:38 AM, Luigi Zanasi wrote:

in Ontario. I know my parents drove in Quebec when I was a kid, and my dad always cursed the province, but in the backseat I never noticed, or cared. :-)
--
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