He's got some balls that bloke

Top of the street an aerial erector just erected an aerial and has just
walked down the slope of the roof to the ridge of the roof to take a coil of
aerial cable offa his mate at the top of the ladder.
No roof ladder and its raining.
Thought I had balls but he takes the biscuit.
Reply to
George
In message , George writes
What nationality? In Poland last summer all the builders I saw (and there were a lot of them) worked like that.
Reply to
Si
ected an aerial and has just
My dad had a roofer work on his roof once replacing slates and the guy just walked around up there without any safety gear. My dad asked him if it was a bit dangerous. he said he'd done it for years with no problems. The next time they met (a year later) the guy was stuck in a wheelchair having fallen off a roof.
Robert
Reply to
RobertL
erected an aerial and has just
My dad had a roofer work on his roof once replacing slates and the guy just walked around up there without any safety gear. My dad asked him if it was a bit dangerous. he said he'd done it for years with no problems. The next time they met (a year later) the guy was stuck in a wheelchair having fallen off a roof.
Robert
I had a mate who was once a roofer,now he's stuck on terra firma with one leg shorter than the other.
Reply to
George
more balls than brains...
what kind of shoes are best for working on slate roofs?
Wellies are soft and spread the load but are there some that grip better?
Reply to
George (dicegeorge)
I used to do that occasionally when doing aerials. Roofs always look steeper from the ground so he was probably OK.
Then, once, I slipped on a mixture of moss and bird shit and was lucky to be able to grab the bracket I had just lashed on the chimney.
Lesson learnt and I always used my hook ladder after that!
Steve
Reply to
Steve
On 29 Jan,
We had a builder like that years ago. He used to do the chimneys for Rediffusion (the wired radio system) where they were damaged by the wires. He fell off and ended up in the wooden box.
Reply to
<me9
In article , George scribeth thus
You can do that on large pantiles and the like, providing the angle of the slope isn't too steep, but not if its been raining or on slate..
Silly sod .. aerial rigging does attract more then its fair share of real cowboys;(...
Reply to
tony sayer
In article , Steve scribeth thus
Quite a few riggers now will have a simple harness to be hooked onto the roof ladder.. Just in case .. and as one man working is the norm you could be writhing around on the ground for quite sometime before anyone would notice!...
Reply to
tony sayer
On 29 Jan, 17:11, "George \(dicegeorge\)" wrote:
Japanese ninja boots! aka. jiki-tabi
They're cloth, with a grippy rubber sole. They fasten up the back with about a thousand little hooks and take an absolute age to get on. They're also freezing cold, not waterproof, and have no puncture resistance whatsoever, either top or bottom.
OTOH, you can run straight up a timber frame with them, or a roof. Fantastic grip. The rubber is itself grippy and the flexible sole with a separate big toe allows you to swing through the trees like a beardy, hippy, gibbon.
You also need special ninja socks (tabi) to go with them, with a separate big toe.
You can get the boots from
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in Germany, and the socks from either there (thick carpenter-grade gunsoku) or indoor ones from Muji near Covent Garden (fantastic shop!)
Reply to
Andy Dingley
But how often hzve you walked up and down on hill slopes of the same angle?
I worry when I'm on a tower and cling to a central point, well away from the edge. But I don't worry when standing on a kerb.
Humans are irrational.
Mary
Reply to
Mary Fisher
Yes I will walk up, and down, a mountain that is steeper than a normal roof, but then mountains have nice foot holds.
Rob
Reply to
robgraham
"Mary Fisher" wrote in message
Erm! you can roll down a hill or its slope...however you can roll down a roof and have a devastating relationship with the pavement.
Reply to
George
In article , "George" writes:
Would have thought that could be an advantage to a roofer. I always wondered if mountain goats had two legs longer than the others.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel

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