OT: Black Friday

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HeyBub wrote:

Beats the Hell out of starvation I guess.
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On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 06:01:56 -0800 (PST), the infamous Jay Pique

Like it or not, -most- Wally World employees are quite happy. If you don't believe me, walk up to any employee and ask "Are you happy working here?" Let us know what you come up with. Be fair, though. Don't start by saying "Your manager makes 10x times more money than you. Is that OK?" Ask around town, too, so you get a good feel for it, then let us know.
-- Some days, it's not even worth chewing through the restraints.
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On 11/28/2009 12:39 AM Greg G. spake thus:

Hey, don't get sore; I think you've got the symptoms pretty much nailed. It's your analysis that's a little bit off.
Yes, we have (by whatever means and for whatever reason) ceded our once economic dominance of the world to others, primarily the Chinese and India. Our practice of offshoring is at least partly to blame. Part of it may have been economically inevitable--the ironclad rule that greedy capitalists always seek the cheapest labor, and if "they" are "willing" to work for 1/10 of our wages, production will relocate there. (Of course, this pretty much glosses over how "willing" they are, how attempts to unionize are grounds for being killed, little or no workplace safety rules, little or no basic human rights, etc., etc.)
Plus, not all that we get from them (China, at least) is junk. The quality is increasing all the time. And why not? After all, these are the folks who were making great technological advances while our (European) forbears were shivering in caves.
--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy neighbours.
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

The United States accounts for about one-quarter of the world's GDP. That number shows no signs of diminishing. China's GDP is growing, true, but that of the US is growing faster. Economic activity is not, in spite of what many liberals think, a zero-sum game.
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On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 03:40:55 -0500, the infamous Greg

Is it any wonder? The prices our goods have been driven to by the liberals, attorneys, and unions are 3 to 50 times that of the exact same item produced in China. But they do still buy a lot of our products. Just nothing in comparison, quantity-wise.
The public is being squeezed by increased prices, resulting in their screaming for lower prices. Businesses find that they could lower prices (and increase shares) by several methods. They respond by changing sources (like offshoring, import only) and building factories overseas. Result: More people out of work, screaming for lower prices.
How much of this is the result of the gov'ts (city/county/state/fed) reacting to idiots? How much is the result of corporations being led by stockholders, who demand that the corp maximize their earnings?
It's a complex problem we won't work out here.

If you dislike the USA so much, Greg, you _are_ free to move, right?
Or we could get back to woodworking, which is already in progress...
-- Some days, it's not even worth chewing through the restraints.
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OOH! OOH! I know! Teacher, ask ME!
;-)
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On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 09:12:43 -0600, the infamous Dave Balderstone

Go for it, Baldy!
-- Some days, it's not even worth chewing through the restraints.
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The correct answer is "YESH!"
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On Sat, 28 Nov 2009 21:58:39 -0600, the infamous Dave Balderstone

Two points!
-- Some days, it's not even worth chewing through the restraints.
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Larry Jaques wrote: ...

The ag export business is one of if not the largest positive contributors to the trade deficit we have yet we can't get congress-critters to move on several outstanding trade agreements to further open certain (primarily South/Central-American at this time) markets by eliminating or substantially reducing their currently high import duties... :(
--
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You're saying the US ag sector needs OTHER countries to open their markets?
ROTFLMAO!
Now THAT'S comedy!
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

We have negotiated deals w/ several countries _they_ want authorized, yes. These are bilateral agreements, not US-imposed. The delays are not on substantial bases, only primarily that production agriculture gets very little attention or has any support in current administration as compared to other (as seen to them as more important) issues.
US is also party to WTO agreements and is in continuing negotiations there w/ EU.
S. Korea, China and some specific others have restricted beef and pork imports quite severely over ill-founded (as in contravening general worldwide science-based standards) and local politics.
In the meantime, the US is importing significant other areas from places that don't necessarily follow our practices in regulating pesticide usage, labor rules and so on at very low or no tariff levels.
--
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That's nonsense. The US had BSE before Canada but the USDA was successfully hiding it. If you think about how cattle moved in BOTH directions over the before the BSE crisis broke, you'll recognize that to say it came from Canada is, pardon the expression, bullshit.
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

I don't believe there's a shred of evidence that supports that position other than the desire on the northern side of the border mitigate responsibility.
--
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Mitigating responsibility.. something the US never does?
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Robatoy wrote: ...

I think you misunderstand...of _course_ and I expect them to; that's their job and they're failing miserably if they don't immediately react to do same.
Nothing the Canadians did during and following the initial discovery was not in what they saw as their best interests--as, for the most, part I think the US reaction was handled about as well as it could have been for damage control by USDA and various other organizations. It's just that some of those actions/statements made weren't necessarily conducive in aiding the US in mitigating the magnitude of the ensuing economic impact. And, of course, that's not particularly surprising; through it all they were continuing to figure out what they could/should do to preserve their own markets and potentially grow them as a side benefit. IOW, "let no crisis go to waste".
Each party has to look out primarily for the interests of their constituents while trying to find mutually-beneficial positions. That's what makes trade negotiations such contentious and difficult things and why there's disagreement on "who's right/who's wrong" depending on the perceived needs and objectives of each side.
OTOH, factual information that can be verified is something else and the other participant in this conversation doesn't seem to have any other than "off-the-record" supposed true confessions of some official.
Given the state of keeping secrets in DC, if such a statement had been made to a news source in Canada by any one w/ actual factual basis for it, it goes beyond credible that the same or another like-minded insider would be able to refrain from making the same or similar revelation/accusation to the Washington Post or one of the other ag-bashing media outlets in the States and all h--- would've broken over it.
--
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I accept that you don't believe it.
I know that our reporters heard it from USDA officials, but in off-the-record conversations.
Let's get back to talking about woodworking...
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Dave Balderstone wrote: ...

What I know is US was certified BSE-free prior to the WA cow whose origin was BC.
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That doesn't contradict anything I've said.
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

Nor does anything you've said have any factual corroborating evidence behind it you've pointed to other than hearsay.
Given the massive amount of testing done after the event and the lack of positive findings, there's no evidence to support that assertion of there being or had been a problem in US herds outside the above connections.
--
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