OOOPS. The Sweat and Tears - NOW the B L O O D . . .

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Connor Aston wrote:

Well, they're your fingers. You have to decide which poses the greatest risk/benefit - gloves and no callouses/splinters but greater risk of bigger damage, or rougher hands. The problem is that any glove that's strong enough to last and that provides substantial protection, is also strong enough to get grabbed by the saw blade and pull your finger into it. You were lucky you didn't loose a finger or fingers.
If you feel that you absolutely have to wear gloves, the blue nitrile surgeons gloves are stronger than latex gloves but probably not strong enough to pull your finger into a blade. Please note and emphasise the word probably. They won't offer as much protection as a heavier glove, but they won't pose as great of a risk.
I'm surprised that no one mentioned your wedding ring. A surgeon friend of mine, and a woodwhacker with a shop I wish I could afford, told me of the dangers of a ring. It would seem that a ring being so tight to the finger is of little danger of being grabbed by a machine tool. Unfortunately, it can get grabbed and when it does the results are truly horrific. The ring _strips_ the flesh off the bone - it's called degloving - and there's nothing that can be done to repair the damage. The finger has to be amputated. None of that quick trip to the ER and a few stitches time to go home stuff. For that reason you should always remove any rings. Another trick I read about in a magazine - not sure how you would test to see if it actually works - is to cut a notch on either side of the ring so that there's only a thin strip holding the ring together. The idea being that the thin strip of metal would give and the ring would be yanked off saving your finger. I have my doubts about the effectiveness. It's also harder to explain to the wife why you lost your wedding ring instead of saying you left it in the shop/garage and returning with it a couple minutes later. So just take the ring off when whacking.
R
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"Connor Aston" wrote in message

Let's put it this way ... your reported experience has done nothing to shake my faith in the time honored conventional wisdom that wearing gloves while operating shop machinery is a bad practice.
I will continue to wear them while handling material, but not while operating machinery.
--
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Of course, the main lesson to be learned here is not to get your fingers that close to the moving blade in the first place. Most of the books say that when cutting anything less than 3 inches wide, use a push stick. I observe this rule most of the time, and when I don't I am extra careful of where all body parts (both hands) are in relation to the moving blade at all times. One tiny moment of distraction can cost you a finger and/or a $1,000 or more trip to the emergency room.
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When did the ER start giving discounts?? :) 16 years a go my thumb cost myself and the insurance a little over $3000.
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Of course, the main lesson to be learned here is not to get your fingers that close to a moving blade in the first place. Most of the books will tell you not to push any board less than three inches wide through the saw without a push stick. Most of the time I observe this rule. When I don't, I do use extra care to know where both hands are at all times. One instant of not paying attention can lead to a lost finger or 2, and a $1,000 or more trip to the emergency room. robo hippy
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On Sat, 4 Mar 2006 10:18:13 +0000 (UTC), "Connor Aston"

Lose the gloves when machining -- period. For moving and stacking wood, that's one thing. When going near small, whirly bits -- gloves are a bad idea. As you were told before and as you have now found out first-hand. Why continue along the same path that injured you in the first place? What do you think the fingerless gloves would do for you?
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Connor Aston wrote:

dave
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Thanks for your kind words Love Connor xox

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Connor Aston wrote:

Have you considered a nice tight fitting tin foil hat?
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as in turkey?

--

%69%20%6c%6f%76%65%20%77%6f%6f%64%77%6f%72%6b%69%6e%67%20%62%75%74%20%69%6d%20%63%72%61%70
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I went to the workshop on Wednesday night and looked at the crime scene. Honestly I nearly fainted. Had been dreaming all week of returning to the table. I started off by making a push stick from 2" dia curtian pole rounded one end and the cut a slot to push the wood with the other. I started the TS and took a deap breath and came over with a cold sweat! Cut one piece and stopped the saw went outside and drank a cup of tea. Then back in a cut the other 6 lenghts and stopped the saw I really felt sick at the thought of what I had done but I suppose its like getting back on a hores and managed to get back to work.
My thumb is still really numb after being slammed down onto the wood but things seem to be on the mend.
Thanks everyone for all you kind comments.
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Connor Aston wrote:

Did you jumble the letters or leave off the W...? ;)
R
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Connor Aston wrote:

I really like what these guys call "rectangular push sticks":
http://www.woodzone.com/images/tips/rectpushstick.jpg
The big advantage is that it lets you apply some force further forwards, not just at the tip of the push stick. Mine are maybe 16" long and 8" high. I also don't have a hole in it...just an indent for the thumb that I cut with a forstner. That way the whole thickness of the board is between the saw blade and my fingers.
Chris
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.

Yes this style actually helps to prevent kick back also. Typical push sticks are not good against kick back.
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Getting back on hores, I'll have to take your word on that one. ;~)

Great
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