new to me countersink bits

I got a set of countersink bits that I'd never seen before. They have a hole drilled diagonally. They have no drill bit they're just for a countersink. They make a clean hole. I'd always just winged it with a drill bit but that doesn't produce the best result. Even if you put a collar on the bit to limit depth.
Have you been using this style of countersink? How hae they worked out?
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2015 13:22:10 -0800, Electric Comet

I have a couple bits like you describe, but they are de-burring bits. Could that be what you have?
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On 1/21/2015 3:22 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Something like these countersinks? Keep us informed of how they work as you use them more. I have often wondered how well they hold up.
http://festoolusa.com/search/?q=countersink
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On 1/21/2015 5:12 PM, Leon wrote:

Martin
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On 1/21/15, 7:02 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

I use these all the time for countersinking. I use to use the "standard" toothed tools and they work well _except_ for the chatter which produces a rough hole in hard/grainy woods. You can reduce the chatter to insignificance with careful choice of feed rates, but it takes practice. I have the Lee Valley countersinks and they cut just as fast as the toothed version but with virtually no need to fuss around trying to get a clean taper.
Nothing against the toothed countersink bits, they still get the nod when cutting metal and other materials with uniform properties, but this is one case where I believe in 'the right tool for the job'.
-BR
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I have a few of those I bought at Horrible Fright that I use for de-burring pin and screw holes in aluminum molds. They seem to work pretty good so far for that. I have used them in wood, but not much. They are cheap enough even if they don't last I can always buy more. They seem to chatter a lot less in aluminum than other tools I have used for the job.
http://www.harborfreight.com/countersink-and-deburring-tool-set-pc-61629.html
Hey, they still have them. Woo! Hoo! They have lost so much of their product line in the last few years I always have to check.
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.. this is the version that Lee Valley sells - .. I haven't tried them. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p2308&cat=1,180,42240,42281
John T.
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2015 13:22:10 -0800, Electric Comet

concerned, they work quite well. I've only used them in a drill press, though.
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:34:46 -0600

They can be used to deburr also, yes
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:12:59 -0600

They are like those pilotless bits. They are no-name but seem fine. I just played in some fir and liked the clean cut
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:01:49 -0700

I'm now embarking on research to find bits for boring wood up to 18" deep and accurate and clean without burn. I found some FAMAG bits but are expensive
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On Wednesday, January 21, 2015 at 11:25:03 AM UTC-10, Electric Comet wrote:

I've used the Weller brand in AL and wood and they make very smooth countersinks.
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On 1/22/2015 6:19 AM, GeneT wrote:

I use them. That is what machinists use, some come with a pilot bearing, so they stay centered, others do not. They are smooth as silk. They do a nice shearing cut.
--
Jeff

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Are you building a boat? That seems to be the place where long holes are often needed. As far as I know, boatbuilders usually use a ship auger bit, usually in a brace rather than a power drill. But those bits tend to cut oversize, so they may not fit the "accurate" part of your requirement.
John
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On Thu, 22 Jan 2015 16:21:07 +0000 (UTC)

Augers can wander like crazy even in a brace. there's a guy that uses a metal lathe to bore holes in wood to get clean, accurate holes.
clearing the swath is critical to prevent heat and burn
I saw a machine on craigslist but never got a reply. 99% of posts on craigslist don't reply
I will probably buy a FAMAG bit although I found a japanese bit that looks like an auger but is advertised to meet my needs too
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Yeah, boatbuilders tend to do a lot of praying while they're drilling long holes. Fortunately, in boats the hole is almost always open at both ends, so you can drill halfway from both sides, which cuts down the error.
John
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wrote:

Deep drilling is always tough. Still a self feeding bit like a ship auger is probably as good a bet as anything. The key is in keeping the drive square, and feeding the drive at the rate the bit self feeds. For smaller holes its harder because the bit flexes more.
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On 1/22/2015 4:39 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:

36. Dad bought it in the early 50's - Stanley naturally - so he could put holes through the big timbers used in our large Victorian house we had. I have bits that fit it - and several braces. We both used them before spade bits came out and continue to even afterwards on most things.
Martin
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I have been using the single point countersinks for over 20 years. They outlast and outperform the other type. The countersinks are smooth and chatter free, especially in aluminum and plastics.
But once I found this type, I seldom use anything else. Any project that requires multiple countersunk flat head fasteners make these a must have. All the countersinks are exactly the identical/correct depth without thinking or guessing.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
On 1/21/2015 3:22 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

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On Sun, 25 Jan 2015 02:37:34 -0600

Not sure what single point countersinks are.

The ones I got also are a fixed depth by design. No need for the foot piece in that set you mention.
They are cheaper and it turns out I got 6 sizes as the smallest in the set has a different size on each end. So 5 bits but 6 sizes.
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