Inverse countersink?

Hi all,
Is there a gadget out there that would de-burr / put a 45 deg chamfer on the end of a range of small diameter rods (say 2-10mm dia)?
Like a hand countersink tool would do for a range of small holes, this *thing* would for rods?
Like a pencil sharpener but at a greater angle and less aggressive?
All the best ..
T i m
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A file?
--
Frank Erskine

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Depending on the quantity and their lengths either a drill held in a vice, or lathe if you have access to one, and a file, but if you have lots to do it would be quite time consuming! Also the chamfers wouldn't be exactly the same but this may not matter.
HTH
John
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I have a grinding wheel with a drill sharpening attachment. It is just a short length of angle iron that holds the end of the drill at a fixed angle to the side of the grinding wheel. It also chamfers the cut ends of rods quite nicely.
When the rods are too short to hold I stick them in the electric drill and spin them against a spinning grinding wheel (usually for putting points on). Rough cuts when the spins are in the opposite directions, face the other way for finishing cuts.
--
Tony Williams.

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On Fri, 07 Apr 2006 13:50:31 +0100, Tony Williams wrote:

I was about to say the same thing.
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Nigel M

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T i m wrote:

A lathe...
:-)
Also, put rod in drill chuck and use static grinding disk,
Also use bench grinder and carefully rotate rod ..
On balance, unless hyper accuracy is required, I'd do the latter.
Bench grinders are pretty cheap in the sheds.
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|Hi all, | |Is there a gadget out there that would de-burr / put a 45 deg chamfer |on the end of a range of small diameter rods (say 2-10mm dia)? | |Like a hand countersink tool would do for a range of small holes, this |*thing* would for rods? | |Like a pencil sharpener but at a greater angle and less aggressive?
A grinding wheel? But that requires a modicum of skill to get the angle consistent.
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Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> Google Groups is IME the *worst*
method of accessing usenet. GG subscribers would be well advised get a
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On Fri, 07 Apr 2006 15:03:35 +0100, Dave Fawthrop

Thanks for the thoughts / ideas so far guys but in hindsight I realise I should have highlited the 'hand tool' direction a bit stronger (I did say 'like a hand countersink / pencil sharpner' but that was still a bit loose) ;-(
In this situation the (plastic) rods are 'fixed' (can't easily be taken to my Myford and aren't 'rod' section all the way down) and only need a rough chamfer on them, just summat better than a dead square end, to assist the entry of the rod through a cover as it's placed over them.
Being a sorta flexible nylony / plastic type material it doesn't take to being 'filed' as such and sorta ends up all hairy (that can be removed with some wet-n-dry but not the magic solution I was hoping for) ;-(
And being only ~ 4mm diameter not an easy size to file / rasp round in situ anyway?
So it want's to be to the rod, what a hand held countersink (rather than de-burring tool) would be to the edges of a drilled hole and used like a chalk on the end of a cue ..(as it portable / adaptable) ;-)
All the best and thanks again ..
T i m
p.s. The nearest thing I can think of is still a pencil sharpener ...
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On Fri, 07 Apr 2006 16:45:04 GMT, T i m wrote:

Get a bit of dowel, countersink the end. Get some wet-n-dry, form it into a cone, glue inside dowel.
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Nigel M

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On Fri, 07 Apr 2006 18:45:49 +0100, Nigel Molesworth

Imaginitive ;-)
I feel this particular plastic would respond better to a blade than the wet-n-dry but it's given me a thought re making my own?
If I bored said cone in the end of a bit of ally rod then cut a slot across the end (parallel to one face of the cone) so that I could slip various grades of grit paper into the side of the 'cone' ...
All the best ..
T i m
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On Fri, 07 Apr 2006 22:50:49 GMT, T i m wrote:

OK, I've got to ask. What's it for?
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Nigel M

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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 10:00:32 +0100, Nigel Molesworth

I wondered when someome would ;-)
It's actually for the body posts on 10th scale RC Touring cars (or any other RC car for that matter).
When you buy most model of car they don't come with bodyshells so they don't know what height they should be so provide extra long ones that need cutting down. You would generally do this with a pair of side cutters but then that leaves a very square end that isn'r fun to get through the bodyshell, sepecially when the race computer is running and you have 10 seconds get the battery in and body back on!.
(this happened last night when a mate arrived with his brand new car and remembered he hadn't trimmed the body posts down. He cut them short with some side cutters but was then left with 4 very square ends (see above))
So, we generally have to take them off and file / sand / shave the end into a rounded point. Because of how they mount on the cars you can't easily put them in a lathe (lumps amd brackets sticking out at all angles) and they are way too flexible to be treated this way.
Hence the need for a suitable 'field' tool that quicky and neatly rounds or even (more realistically) chamfers the ends of these body posts.
If such doesn't currently exist then maybe there is a market for them. The other day I bought a nice tapered reamer for making the holes in the polycarbonate bodyshells (9.99). Normally you have to drill a hole then open it up with a taper reamer but this ones starts at a point so you can take it straight through from scratch (again, handy if you get to the track and realise you have forgotten to make the hole for the transponder) ;-(
All the best ..
T i m
p.s. I've just sorta got back into 10th scale electrics via a couple of mates and my daughter (who was a sponsered racer when she was 8 <g>). Even with an obosolete car and batteries that had fungus growing out the end I managed 3rd in the 'A' final last night, closely followed by my daughter (now 15) ;-)
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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 09:38:35 GMT, T i m wrote:

And a pencil sharpener doesn't work?
Try an eyeliner pencil sharpener, they cut at a less steep angle.
<http://www.auravita.com/products/AURA/orad12860.asp
Slightly worried that I know this.
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Nigel M

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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 10:49:46 +0100, Nigel Molesworth

<shrug>
Ah, right .. I'll see if the girls have such a thing in their kit/// makup bags ;-)

Hey, I'm ok with it if you are 'Nigel' (or 'Nigella' is it at the weekends maybe.?) ;-)
All the best ..
T i m
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How about something like this
___ ... ___ | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |\ | | | | \ | | | | \| | | | \ | | | |\ | | | | \ | | |___|..\|___| where the diagonal line is a slot with a bit of tool steel inserted, with the edge ground like a lathe tool.
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wrote:

Hey, thanks for that Rob ;-)
Yup, that was the sort of thing I was thinking of *except* that this 'waxy-nylony-plastic' might be a bit particular to cut.
If you have something too aggressive it's likely to snag and just twist the rod up as you try to turn it and too shallow and it's likely to skid over the surface ;-(
I dare say with a bit of trial-and-error it would work though (assuming I can't find something ready made first of course ;-)
Like Nigella's <weg> eyeliner trimmer. I buy them for 99p from Boots, peel off the Boots sticker and apply the chrome TRP (Tims Racing Products) one and sell them for 9.99 [1] to the model car racing boys! ;-)
Holiday villa here we come! (not)
All the best ..
T i m
[1] minus Nigella's commision of course. ;-)
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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 12:06:13 GMT, T i m wrote:

Another thought. When I chamfer the edges of plastic pipe, I use a Stanley blade held at right angles to the direction of cut. It doesn't cut, more of a scrape.
Perhaps you could make a small jig to hold a scalpel blade.
--
Nigel M

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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 14:27:00 +0100, Nigel Molesworth

Understood and I generally use my Leatherman knife blade as it's with me all the time ;-)

I should think so ... hmmm .. <thoughts> . ;-)
All the best ..
T i m
p.s. I like yer yacht btw .. the bigest we got to was a 21 (Dad's a Master Mariner (Shell tankers) and Yachts Master) ;-)
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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 16:03:17 GMT, T i m wrote:

How? ... Oh yes, I posted a link in another thread didn't I.
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Nigel M

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On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 17:10:17 +0100, Nigel Molesworth

Oh yes, you can run but you'll only die tired .. ;-)
All the best ..
T i m
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