New Ridgid Tablesaw

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Funny how businesses evolve. I recently had a new high efficiency oil boiler installed. It was done by Southbridge Tire Company. Yes, they still sell tires too, but oil is the big part of the business today. FWIW, it is saving my money, about 32% last fill-up.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

My favorite is Sprint. More precisely SPRInT. Southern Pacific Railroad Internal Telecommunications.
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Leon wrote:

The places in your area look like my kind of stores.
The one thing that struck me odd when I looked for Ridgid's authorized service locations is that there are four within 100 miles of my location. Only two are less that 50 miles from my home. I'm familiar with the big name players in my local area that perform warranty service and sell parts for the majority of power tool, appliance and automobile parts. Most of the major power tool manufactures all use one of three places in my area. I've never heard of the two Ridgid uses, and have driven past both hundreds of time and never even knew they were there. One looks like a small mom & pop hardware store, the other looks like a commercial garage. It doesn't appear that either of them sell Ridgid tools?
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Well yeah, if you want it fixed, you gotta get it back to them. I don't know if too many brands where they come to you to pick up the tool to repair it. I was the repair guy with Jet even though the repair center was only 6 miles away.
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No I hadn't. I was strapped for time yesterday. But I've read it over now.
In the part you didn't post, there's the usual disclaimer info that pertains to what is and is not covered. In essence it's the standard "Ridgid is not responsible for problems not of our making" (see below) -- which, it seems to me, leaves it entirely up to discretion of the person doing the repairs to make that determination.
Begging the question: Has anyone here had cause to repair a Ridgid product, and if so, how pleased were you with your experience. Maybe a topic for another thread???
"...warranty only covers defects arising under normal usage and does not cover any malfunction, failure or defect resulting from misuse, abuse, neglect, alteration, modification or repair by other than an authorized service center for RIDGID branded hand held and stationary power tools".
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Well naturally there would be a disclaimer, neglect and purposely damaging the tool would void that warranty.

I revall having read about repairs on their equipment. But besides that has anyone ever been dissatisfied with the product or warranty. Typically you hear about problems more so than a tool that performs as expected.

Would you expect otherwise? The tool is not built and expected to perform when misused, abused, or neglected. They do BTY advertise in some of thir ads that routine maintaince is covered under the warranty. I suspect that if you neglect to get routine "free" service performed that that would void the warranty.
BMW warrants their cars under warranty and perform free maintance for the first 4 years of 50,000 miles. If you don't have the oil changed at all, for free, or otherwise and blow the engine, it is going to be on you.
It is a common sense thing.
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Of course. I'd not meant to be obtuse or contentious. I realize that Ridgid is not in business to provide its customers with tools, unconditionally, for life.
But you seemed a little smitten with this idea of a "Lifetime Waranty" as if the whole notion made your heart go pitter-pat and your knees all weak. If it did, then who am I to tell you any different? I happen to be a little more skeptical though. It's a common sense thing. <eg>
What it comes down to for me is that some guy -- someone collecting a paycheck from Ridgid -- decides what is and is not "abuse, neglect, or purposeful damage". Regardless of how I've treated my TS, it's this guy's word against mine. What's the likelihood that, should my motor burn out or something else happen 5, 10, or 15 years down the road -- that he is going to decide that it was due to a "defect in workmanship"? Do you really think he's going to decide in my favor? If your answer is other than "Highly unlikely" then I'd love to tell you how to triple your money in this little ponzi scheme that I've got going... ;)
I bought Ridgid because I read some good stuff about the product I wanted. The price was right. And it was available the day I needed it. And the warranty? Well it didn't even crack my top 5 reasons for buying.
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Sheesh. It seems obvious. Buy tools made by someone you trust, rather than from the huckster trying to make the sale with warranty promises they knowingly won't honor.

Do you have an expectation that the 15 year old motor dies due to hidden manufacturing defects? What's your understanding of a warranty against defects in material or manufacturing?
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I am kinda confused on the issue also. The company in question has a pretty good reputation for building good tools and has one of the best warranties in the industry. If after making a compairison of features and it was a toss up between 3 or 4 brands, the better warranty is the one that gets the nod.

AND Defects in Materials and Manufacturing aside, simply being used so much that they wear out is covered also. Now if that motor had hammer dent marks, modified wiring, had been subject to the wrong voltage or hit by lightning, I can see the warranty being voided.
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On Sun, 15 Mar 2009 10:23:50 -0500, Leon wrote:

Of course, there's always the question of the company still being around 10-20 years from now. That's never a given, but in today's economy....
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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True but unless you "know" a company is about to fold you cannot make a decision on what might be.
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Larry Blanchard wrote:

If Ridgid was making substandard ovepriced tools it would be one thing, but even without the lifetime warranty their tools are exceptional value.
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Oh, come on. At this moment, ANY person who guarantees almost any cmpany being around a decade from now is foolish. The company that manufactures Ridgid tools, or at least the table saw, is immense, as is Home Depot. That doesn't mean either can fail, but in general, manufacturers tend to have less greedy and more able managers-- especially those not auto related...bankers and insurance, Jaysus! AIG is paying $170 million bucks of our money to keep their "skilled managers," the guys who led them into their current debacle.
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On Sun, 15 Mar 2009 14:01:16 -0700, Charlie Self wrote:

That's what I meant. I wasn't implying that HD was any more or less likely to fail than any other company. I'm just not overly impressed with so-called lifetime warranties. OTOH, at my age 10-20 years will handle my lifetime :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Snip

As is the case with ANY product that you buy. Fortunately "that guy" is not the end of the line, there are other service centers and others up the chain of command that can authorize the repair. With a Life Time warranty that replaces batteries and any part that simply wears out or is found to be defective you have to admit that the warranty is as good as it gets and is probably going to protect you as long as you won the product. Having been in the service business for my entire career I can assure you that if the work gets turned down the repair shop looses out on revenue. They don't save money by turning down warranty work. With that understanding, if you bring in a tool with more than one "unrelated" broken part the tool was probably abused.
What's the likelihood that, should my motor

Worn out is covered also.

FWIW, I have a Wayne Dalton Garage Door and Opener. The door has had to have a spring replaced at my cost as the door was out of warranty as far as the spring was concerned. No problem, I understood that. Later the motor on the opener started to go bad several years after the initial warrany expired. I looked at the warranty I noticed that the motor has a life time warranty. I called the manufacturer up and describe the problem to the woman and she UPS'ed me a new motor and appoligised for the inconveinence.

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On Sat, 14 Mar 2009 17:40:00 -0500, Leon cast forth these pearls of wisdom...:

Nope. No requirement for any "routine maintenance".
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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I suspect that would be subject to the specific tool. I recall an ad on their worm drive circular saw. They were showing a chart of how you might expect the tool to hold up at several thousand hour intervals. Something like 5,000 hours, 200 homes framed, 10,000 hours tool brought in for free service and hypoid oil replaced, 15,000 the tool......
From their site, and with registration you get the extended life time warranty. It does state that the tool must be properly maintained, which I understand to mean that routine maintenance would be required. The saw I mentioned above does cover in the maintainence section of the owners manual, checking of the oil level and replacing the oil. Now If I had the saw and burned it up because it ran low on oil I would not expect it to be covered under warranty, but maybe they would.
WHAT IS COVERED UNDER THE LIFETIME SERVICE AGREEMENT:
The Lifetime Service Agreement on RIDGID Hand Held Power Tools, Stationary Power Tools and Pneumatic Tools covers all worn parts in properly maintained tools, including normal wear items such as brushes, chucks, motors, switches, gears and even cordless batteries in your qualifying RIDGIDBrand hand held and stationary power tools; and replacement rings, driver blades and bumpers on RIDGID Brand pneumatic tools for the lifetime of the original owner. This Lifetime Service Agreement does not apply to other RIDGID Brand products.
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Some upscale table saws now feature granite, Steel City, maybe?. Personally, I would rather deal with a bit of rust on my cast iron than a chip in granite. Maybe an epoxy repair kit should be included with stone tops. Note that machine shops using granite surface plates tend to baby them with covers, etc. For sure, granite is a better choice than aluminum for a table saw and much better than marble for a tombstone.
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wrote:

Some upscale table saws now feature granite, Steel City, maybe?. Personally, I would rather deal with a bit of rust on my cast iron than a chip in granite. Maybe an epoxy repair kit should be included with stone tops. Note that machine shops using granite surface plates tend to baby them with covers, etc. For sure, granite is a better choice than aluminum for a table saw and much better than marble for a tombstone.
Well there ya go.
Buy a granite topped saw, and when you die, recycle it into a tombstone! Build a coffin to go with it.
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