Mobile Router Center

I am thinking about building the portable router center in American Woodworker magazine. I like the design but there are a few things I would like to change. First the fence is designed for either left hand or right handed use. I would like to change that to right handed only and put in a mitre guage track. I would also like to put in a surge protector instead of a switch to make it easy to unplug when changing the bits. It would also be nice to be able to put a garbage bucket under the drop-down table when being used. Has anyone any other suggestions or ideas on how to make this better or cheaper. I priced the locking casters at $10.00CDN. That makes it kind of pricy but still feasible. I realize the plan is a showcase for publication and not necessarily a finished product any comments?
Tom
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You only need a power strip, cheaper that surge protection. You can also put a 4 x 4 box and put a receptacle in it controlled by a switch. That is a little more "positive" feel when turning the router off and on, yet still easy to unplug. It will also mount more solidly than most power strips with slots.
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Ed
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I was thinking of a power strip but wrote surge protector. One other thing that I have since noticed is that to change the bits I would also need a router lift. That would allow me to do that from the table top. I could also put in cleats at the bottom of the router box, mount the plate on a smaller box that would sit on top of those cleats and use a couple of window latches underneath to allow me to take the router out and change bits but at the same time hold it in place when the table is folded up and put away. In the configuration shown the table is not functional and does not allow for changing bits. I think he was in a hurry to get to press!
Tom Edwin Pawlowski ( snipped-for-privacy@snet.net) wrote:
: : > : > I would also like to put in a surge protector instead : > of a switch to make it easy to unplug when changing the bits.
: You only need a power strip, cheaper that surge protection. You can also : put a 4 x 4 box and put a receptacle in it controlled by a switch. That is : a little more "positive" feel when turning the router off and on, yet still : easy to unplug. It will also mount more solidly than most power strips with : slots. : -- : Ed : http://pages.cthome.net/edhome /
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Tom, what kind of router are you going to be using in your table?
You might consider hinging the top at the back so you can simply raise the top and change the bit without removing the router from the table.
If you are using a plunge router perhaps you'd be interested in the under $10 router lift I made for mine. It was quick and easy to make and I end up using it on the router when handholding it, too. If you are interested, I'll give you a link to some pictures and describe the thing for you.
Dave
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Dave ( snipped-for-privacy@iwon.com) wrote: : Tom, what kind of router are you going to be using in your table?
Looking at a King Canada 3 1/4 hp but have not purchased one yet. It will see heavy usage whatever brandname I get.
: You might consider hinging the top at the back so you can simply raise : the top and change the bit without removing the router from the table.
I thought of that but also thought that raising the router so high might be ackward also the lower center of gravity would make the entire table more stable. I'm keeping all my ideas in mind though!
: If you are using a plunge router perhaps you'd be interested in the : under $10 router lift I made for mine. It was quick and easy to make : and I end up using it on the router when handholding it, too. If you : are interested, I'll give you a link to some pictures and describe the : thing for you.
No, don't go to all that trouble just yet. It will be a while before I get around to the router because it will be one of the most expensive items. I will post again in the future. Thanks for your ideas though. The lifts in the magazine were very expensive so it set my ideas back a bit. The router is a plunge router I almost forgot to mention. I saw cheaper routers than the King, ie Chicago but I don't want to go too cheap I might be sorry later!!!
Thanks again Dave! Tom
: Dave
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Tom, I'm not familiar with the King Canada line. I went to their website but they don't show a picture of their router. Have you seen any independent reviews of this router? My concern would be getting service for an unknown name brand.
Here's a bit of advice that has stood me in good stead. Buy the best tools you can afford. The qualtiy of your tools will have an effect on the quality of your work. Also if you buy a $100 router instead of a better $200 one but you have to replace it after two years and the second one costs you $150. You have actually spent more money than you would have on the better router.
In any case. If you are concerned about center of gravity issues with a hinged top, you might think about making the top sit just inside the legs and pivoting the top near its center line.
As far as that goes, if you hinge the router table at the back and don't lift it more than say 70 or 80, the CG won't really move back much if any.
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Dave ( snipped-for-privacy@iwon.com) wrote: : Tom, I'm not familiar with the King Canada line. I went to their : website but they don't show a picture of their router. Have you seen : any independent reviews of this router? My concern would be getting : service for an unknown name brand.
I am not surprized it isn't up on their site yet it was a new product this last christmas. It is feature rich but haven't seen any reviews yet. They do have a good enough name though.
: Here's a bit of advice that has stood me in good stead. Buy the best : tools you can afford. The qualtiy of your tools will have an effect on : the quality of your work. Also if you buy a $100 router instead of a : better $200 one but you have to replace it after two years and the : second one costs you $150. You have actually spent more money than you : would have on the better router.
: In any case. If you are concerned about center of gravity issues with a : hinged top, you might think about making the top sit just inside the : legs and pivoting the top near its center line.
Will remember all ideas posted here, thanks.
Tom
: As far as that goes, if you hinge the router table at the back and : don't lift it more than say 70 or 80, the CG won't really move back : much if any.
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Dave,
Did I miss the link or did you not include it? I would also love to see it.
Bob

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You didn't miss it. I said I'd post it if there is interest. Here it is. http://www.woodshopphotos.com/gallery/Dave-R1s-Album/routerlift http://www.woodshopphotos.com/gallery/Dave-R1s-Album/routerliftbase http://www.woodshopphotos.com/gallery/Dave-R1s-Album/routerlifttop First link is to an overall view, the second and third are detail shots.
It's simple as can be. Pictures were taken of the original version. I have since cut the adjusting rod down a bit.
6mm threaded rod screwed into threaded bosses diagonally across the base. Rod is lockied with a nut and lockwasher jammed on the base. The rod is cut so it clears the top of the motor by a couple of inches.
A crossbar of hardwood is drilled to receive these rods. Midway between those holes is another hole drilled to accept a teenut on the bottom. I used a 3/8-16 teenut but you could use anything you want within reason.
The adjuster is a length of 3/8-16 rod (imagine that!) with a brass acorn nut bearing against the motor and a knob on the other end.
That's it. If you have the stuff laying around, it shouldn't take you more than 15 minutes to make and install.
Leave it on the router all the time. It doesn't weight very much and makes it a simple thing to adjust the router when you are handholding it, too.
There you go. Whatcha think, Bob?
Dave
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Dave,
Thanks..... That is a "brilliant" idea. I'll be keeping this one on file for sure and hopefully I can get out in the shop this weekend and put this together with my eyes closed.
You a good fella Dave.... That's what I think :~)

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You didn't miss it. I said I'd post it if there is interest. Here it is. http://www.woodshopphotos.com/gallery/Dave-R1s-Album/routerlift http://www.woodshopphotos.com/gallery/Dave-R1s-Album/routerliftbase http://www.woodshopphotos.com/gallery/Dave-R1s-Album/routerlifttop First link is to an overall view, the second and third are detail shots.
It's simple as can be. Pictures were taken of the original version. I have since cut the adjusting rod down a bit.
6mm threaded rod screwed into threaded bosses diagonally across the base. Rod is lockied with a nut and lockwasher jammed on the base. The rod is cut so it clears the top of the motor by a couple of inches.
A crossbar of hardwood is drilled to receive these rods. Midway between those holes is another hole drilled to accept a teenut on the bottom. I used a 3/8-16 teenut but you could use anything you want within reason.
The adjuster is a length of 3/8-16 rod (imagine that!) with a brass acorn nut bearing against the motor and a knob on the other end.
That's it. If you have the stuff laying around, it shouldn't take you more than 15 minutes to make and install.
Leave it on the router all the time. It doesn't weight very much and makes it a simple thing to adjust the router when you are handholding it, too.
There you go. Whatcha think, Bob?
Dave
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Would you please be kind enough to give the link for us lurkers to see the hinged table and the lift for the handheld. TIA
Gerry
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Gerry, I did post the links to the router lift pictures but I'll repost here.
"You didn't miss it. I said I'd post it if there is interest. Here it is. http://www.woodshopphotos.com/gallery/Dave-R1s-Album/routerlift http://www.woodshopphotos.com/gallery/Dave-R1s-Album/routerliftbase http://www.woodshopphotos.com/gallery/Dave-R1s-Album/routerlifttop First link is to an overall view, the second and third are detail shots.
It's simple as can be. Pictures were taken of the original version. I have since cut the adjusting rod down a bit.
6mm threaded rod screwed into threaded bosses diagonally across the base. Rod is lockied with a nut and lockwasher jammed on the base. The rod is cut so it clears the top of the motor by a couple of inches.
A crossbar of hardwood is drilled to receive these rods. Midway between
those holes is another hole drilled to accept a teenut on the bottom. I
used a 3/8-16 teenut but you could use anything you want within reason.
The adjuster is a length of 3/8-16 rod (imagine that!) with a brass acorn nut bearing against the motor and a knob on the other end.
That's it. If you have the stuff laying around, it shouldn't take you more than 15 minutes to make and install.
Leave it on the router all the time. It doesn't weight very much and makes it a simple thing to adjust the router when you are handholding it, too. "
I'll do a sketch of my suggestion for a center pivoting router table as well as the simple rear hinged version. When I get it done, I'll post a link.
Bob, thanks for the compliments. Let me know how it goes if you build that lift.
Dave
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http://www.woodshopphotos.com/albums/Dave-R1s-Album/RT1.jpg
There's a link to a quick drawing I did showing two ways to hinge the top of a router table. The one on the top left would get trunk latches or something on the front to keep the table level in use. Gravity would take care of the other.
The center of gravity will not move back much if any when the top is up.
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Tom, here are a couple of things I've done that you might consider.
First, no casters. I put a couple of fixed wheels on one end so that they are just in contact with the floor when the table is sitting level. To move the table I lift one end and it acts like a wheelbarrow. I have a belt/disc sander done the same way but it was built by my grandfather years ago. He made the wheels for that from wood.
For wiring, I wired my table with a duplex outlet on the back and two switches on the front. The sockets are split so the router plugs into one and I can plug my shop vac or a light into the other.
I have also wired in a service disconnect box (on my tablesaw, too) in a handy spot. When I'm changing a bit (or blade) I pull the handle out and lay it on the table. That way I can see at a glance whether there is power or not.
Since my router and tablesaw are both 120V, I wired the service disconnect box so that both the hot and neutral wires are disconnected. On the tablesaw the ground is continuous through the box. There is no ground on the router although I have ground up to the box the router is plugged into.
As far as the miter gauge slot goes, get it as clost to the router as you can. My only gripe with my Bench Dog top as well as other commercial ones is that the slot is too far away.
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