Miter saw extension designs

I looked at many designs for miter saw tables. There are "wing" extensions, rolling tables, commercial stands, fence hardware "kits", a scrap of plywood, etc
The commercial foldup stands seem oriented to job site work. I want a real work surface. So, after 1/2 completing my own version, I have some miter saw extensions opinion questions. I've made solid base extensions on an existing fixed table and then made two fence versions and I'm still not happy.
The first fence version was relatively high from birch plywood, the second was simply cut from extruded aluminum (about 1.5 inches high). If the fence is high, you either leave a gap or cut it down near the saw to account for the sliding fence. The aluminum is easy, tough and fit nicely agaist the saw but will never have a sliding track.
You made it through my ramble, so here are some topics:
- Assuming you include some type of sliding length stop, is the fence top, fence side or the base a better choice for a T slot or track? There are some pricy folding stops out there with a track on the top.
- I don't want the add on fence to interfere with the tall sliding fence on the actual saw. Should the extension fence simply be low and "under" the saw sliding parts? You end up with less support for a tall piece "away" from the saw. Or, should the whole add on fence slide too? A gap seems just wrong. In other words, do you find vertical support away from the actual saw of much value?
- I have a double bevel saw with six feet of wall and one side open to dedicate. By "open" I mean a long space normally used as a walkway that can not normally be blocked. What is more practical: Two foot extensions on each side? Four feet on the fixed side and some folding arm on the open side? Put the whole thing on wheels with everything folding? It seems that the more complex you go (wheels, folding or removable parts, etc), the more you need to adjust - possibly in all three axes.
I have a picture of the two foot long aluminum version if anyone is interested.
Thanks for any comments.
- S
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Just as soon as you get a "perfect" setup and get the saw all set up,bolted down, and just generally perfect, somebody is going to need that saw at another location to build some great thing(like a deck) or other glorious building project.
I would stay flexible and set something up that works pretty well and yet can be moved pretty quickly.
Here is Swingman's version in a fairly small shop:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/Jigs.htm
or mine which is the infamous "Norm chopsaw Station"
http://home.att.net/~mboceanside/wsb/html/view.cgi-photo.html--SiteID-773459.html
which is just a "wee" bit long at 23'.
You have a "very" limited space and should stay in the Swingman's version in my opinion.
I'll comment on the many questions you asked in-line.
S wrote:

Simple T-track works pretty well.. you can buy several expensive stops.. A block of wood with a 1/4" works pretty well.
In other words, do you find vertical support away

NO
That is correct...Keep it simple as possible.
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Pat Barber wrote:

http://home.att.net/~mboceanside/wsb/html/view.cgi-photo.html--SiteID-773459.html

Thanks - started using it yesterday.
I went with the simple aluminum L fence on 2' side extensions and the whole thing can be moved as three pieces (saw, left side, right side). When I build that deck, I will find out how easily it actually transports.
- S
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