Home Depot Plywood Quality

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todd wrote:

No! NW line will take you as far as Harvard or Woodstock. Western line takes you to Elgin, maybe a spur to Elburn. Not sure. Woodstock would be the closest to Rockford.
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Problem was that the railroads were privately owned. We weren't so keen on capitalizing them, because the same sort of talk about corporate welfare and being in the pocket of big corporations would have begun ad nauseam. They were occupied trying to get the firemen off the diesels at the time.
Without eminent domain the highways would be impossible, much less railroad rights of way. Though we can take for purposes of economic development now, right? Then there's the demand to get them all off of street level anyway so that motorists who can't wait or like to challenge trains won't get hurt. Think of the liability insurance, the toxic spills, the horror....
I remember the Chicago, South Shore and South Bend as quite a ride. Still there?
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We had one. What happend to it?
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
||| || An improved railway system || would have been a possible good alternative or addition. | | We had one. What happend to it?
Sad story involving unfathomable amounts of greed and stupidity on the part of more participants than just railroads, unions, and government...
[1] Railroad management squeezed their employees a bit too much [2] Railroad employees unionized to protect themselves [3] Unions squeezed railroads a bit too much [4] Government stepped in to regulate the daylights out of all [5] Railroads stopped being profitable [6] Expensive passenger service dropped [7] Costly-to-maintain freight routes dropped [8] Freight business migrates to trucking [9] Freight business falls below critical mass [10] Entire railroad companies expire
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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To perhaps give you a different perspective on the difference between East coast and SoCal transit, consider the following:
Since you live in Fairlawn, NJ, a question.
How long would it take you to travel between Fairlawn and New Haven, CT to say attend classes at Yale?
For many in SoCal, that would be a fairly typical length of commute.
Lew
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Cornell Medical School, Columbia university, New York University or a dozen other universities which would be acceptable for me and closer by.
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Han
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Yeah, Lew, but you wouldn't do it. Go to Rutgers or Princeton instead, or even NYU or Columbia. COmmuting that distance in the east is nuts...there are simply too many alternatives.
I used to commute from Amawalk, NY (northern Westchester County) to Manhattan when I worked in a downtown ad agency--William St. That didn't last too long. It blew something close to five hours a day, and at 23, I had other uses for that five hours. I simply moved into Manhattan (admittedly, probably not a solution today, especially if you're making a munificent $85 a week). Single room, with bath but no cooking facilities, $13 a week.
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Charlie Self wrote:

This was during the Depression????
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It's turtles, all the way down

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Charlie Self wrote:
> > Yeah, Lew, but you wouldn't do it. Go to Rutgers or Princeton instead, > or even NYU or Columbia. COmmuting that distance in the east is > nuts...there are simply too many alternatives.
I had almost forgotten that part of east coast culture.
"Commute" is a word in a foreign language they do not understand.
Of course with the east coat highway system, it is understandable.
30 years ago, The Garden State looked like a page straight out of the Monopoly game. If it were ever to come up to current standards, a complete rebuild would be necessary.
Still remember a trip up the NJ Pike AKA: Parking lot.
Sunday night, 5:00PM, just another weekend, hit the NJ Pike from the PA Pike and come to a complete stop.
3-4 hours of stop & go later, the Holland Tunnel.
Definitely not a winner.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

poverty-stricken. Not to mention double digit inflation.
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Yes, but in Europe, they have cars with much, much better gas efficiency so it all comes out in the wash for the most part. Here, we have too many idiots driving gas guzzling SUVs and whining about gas prices. Um... duh?
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Not really....the massive trade deficit will do that.....tis a function of floating currency values. As we import massive quantities of expensive oil, Natural gas, Chinese everything etc. other countries can only hold on to so much U.S. currency before the relative currency value goes down. Imports may cost more but American products become more competitive and U.S. jobs increase....In fact our deficit spending keeps relative currency values from plummeting further since exporters buy our "notes" with their excess U.S. currency.......Rod
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wish I'd bought $10K in Canadian years ago... The Euro is at an all-time high, the British pound is at a 26 year high, on and on
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Ralph E Lindberg wrote:

( I've seen threads go off topic/track - but this one's headed off in some interesting directions - economics, public policy, trans- -portation and land use policy. So let's head off onto foreign policy.)
Ah - the Half Full view. The other way of seeing it is that the US dollar is declining significantly, as is how much of the rest of the world's opinion of the US in terms of our foreign policy.
We, the United States, are a relatively young country and are still learning how to deal with problems. At the moment, we happen to be being led by a child, and a not very bright one at that. Not the best situation to be in when crisis arise (see 911/Afgahnistan/Iraq/Iran/Katrina/Enron/Abrimoff/...) and more on the horizon (global warming/impending energy crisis/culture clash/social security/medical costs/...). We will get over it in time. Please bear with us a bit longer. Sorry about the inconvenience we're causing - we're working on getting back on track. charlie b
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charlieb wrote:

The President has relatively little influence on the national economy. Congress, Big Business, Bis Labor, and the Federal Reserve all have more to do with it.
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Just Wondering wrote: | charlieb wrote: || || We, the United States, are a relatively young country and are || still learning how to deal with problems. At the moment, we || happen to be being led by a child, and a not very bright one || at that. | | The President has relatively little influence on the national | economy. Congress, Big Business, Bis Labor, and the Federal Reserve | all have more to do with it.
As reflected in the decision to not open the Iraqi reconstruction to a normal bidding process?
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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EXT wrote:
| What most Americans don't know is that the US currency is in the | toilet. I run a Canadian company which has 99% of its income in US | dollars. Our revenue is up but when converted to Canadian dollars | it becomes less than years before. I used to get $1.60 Canadian for | every one US dollar, now I only get $1.08 per US dollar and the | experts say that the two currencies will be par by year end.
Actually, most Americans /do/ know it. If you look at it from the outside, then the dollar is in the tank - and when you look at it from the inside, then the cost of everything bought with dollars is skyrocketing. Either way, it's the same inflation.
What most Americans don't seem to recognize is that it's all happening in a completely predictable "cause and effect" sequence, and that the current level of inflation is merely a gentle introduction...
| This means that whatever you bought a couple of years ago that was | imported, now it is going to cost you almost 50% more today because | the other currencies in the world have not dropped as much as the | US dollar.
It's not just imported goods - the cost of doing business in the US is being affected and the cost of domestic goods is on the same track as imported goods. It's just a little further back on the train because a lot of American businesses are dragging their feet on raising prices.
There's not much good anywhere in the picture. As the US dollar drops relative to other currencies, Americans will necessarily cut back on their purchases of imported goods - leaving exporters with excessive inventory, excessive capacity, and excessive employment. Worse, or at least as bad, obligations payable in US dollars will be paid in devalued currency (which you're already experiencing).
| Home Depot, Wal-Mart and many others compensate by buying even | cheaper crap so that the price doesn't go up, that is why the | plywood is now pure junk.
That can only be carried so far. At some point the merchandise becomes so crappy that no one wants to buy it, the prices are forced up anyway to the point where the merchandise becomes unaffordable, and the commercial structure needs to be rebuilt.
About then some damn political cowboy will come along and tell us: "Hey! War is _good_ for business."
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Uh, no. The current inflation rate of about 34% compares favorably with the inflation rate of 2000-06 of 2.45%, 1990-99 of 3.0%, and 1980-89 of 5.55%.
"Skyrocketing" ocurred during the Carter years: 1970-79 7.09%

Very gentle. Productivity, GDP, and personal income all exceed inflation.

Nothing bought two years ago costs 50% more today (except maybe energy). Not steel, aluminum, grain, manganese, or manufactured goods.

This has never happened in the past, but your predictions of economic mayhem are just as valid as other economists.

Well, it is. GDP increased 26% from 2000 to 2005 ($9.8 to $12.4 trillion) or about $3,000 per person in constant 2000 dollars.
This, coupled with a net saving in military lives*, makes war a win-win scenario.
===*Fewer military deaths in six years of Afghanistan/Iraq war than in 8 years of the previous administration's peace years.
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Excuse me?
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