Home Depot Plywood Quality

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snipped-for-privacy@cww97.com wrote:

Your "testimonial" might have more credibility had you told us you were the same Mike Williams who OWNS Creative Woodworks and that rather than buying solid and plywood FROM them you buy it FOR the business and sell it.
Your posts aren't exactly truthful now, are they? They are, IMNSHO, rather tacky.
BTW, fire your web designer (or hire one), for a commercial establishment such as yours the site sucks!
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Say What? wrote:

At least now I know a place NOT to buy from :-).
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It's turtles, all the way down

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HerHusband wrote:
> There's no point to this message, other than I need to vent somewhere... > :) > > I'm building a new entertainment center and just bought three sheets of > 3/4" birch plywood and one sheet of 1/2" birch plywood from my local Home > Depot. <snip>
Two (2) mistakes:
1) Walking thru the doors of Home Depot. 2) Thinking they even know what Birch cabinet plywood is, much less sell it.
Plywood distributors exist for a reason.
Lew
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You know, as a sidebar to this, Home Depot sold quality plywood a few years ago. (5?- 7?) It was the same stuff I got at my hardwoods guy, even the same stamps sometimes. It was just a about 20% less.
Then they sold a hardwood faced ply that was called something like "cabply" or "cabinet ply" with no claims as to what wood it was. It was clear, had the appearance of first veneer cut ash, not anything at all resemblign birch, but was very close grained. Not porous at all. It came from Chile, so of course we called it Chiliply. I used a lot of it for all kinds of things stained and painted.
Now they sell that junk. When I built the aforementioned tables, I was really surprised as some of that stuff was a full 3/16" out of square! OK, we are all past thinking that a sheet of >anything< is square. But 3/16"?
My point is that when they sold the better stuff, there was a thriving market for it. A lot of the cabinet guys and smaller contractors ate that stuff up. Many times I would go to HD to get some, and they would be out. At the price, it made wonderful small cabinets, paint grade vanities, uitlity room cabinets, etc. I know it is a function of money/time on the rack/bottom line, etc., but I can't figure out why they QUIT carrying a better grade since it was selling. The sold the daylights out of that stuff.
Now they have the Chinaply whenever I would want it. Problem is, I don't. There is so much in the racks, apparently a lot of others don't either.
Robert
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You're right ... last time I got good Oak 3/4" ply from HD was around 2002. IIRC, it was around $42/sheet, which was a pretty good price at the time, void free, relatively thick veneer compared to the higher wood boutique prices, and much heavier than what they sell as plywood at any BORG today.
I just got a quote from my hardwood dealer yesterday for 3/4"x4x8 A1 rift sawn red oak - $115.95/sheet; up $11/sheet since I bought the last load just about one year ago.
Inflation? ... what inflation?
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Now I don't feel so bad over $75 a sheet for the 3/4" stuff I got from my hardwood dealer last winter. Might have gotten a cut rate due to the rest of the almost $2,000 order.
P D Q
message<BR><BR>&gt; You know, as a sidebar to this, Home Depot sold quality plywood a few<BR>&gt; years ago.&nbsp; (5?- 7?)&nbsp; It was the same stuff I got at my hardwoods guy,<BR>&gt; even the same stamps sometimes.&nbsp; It was just a about 20% less.<BR><BR>You're right ... last time I got good Oak 3/4" ply from HD was around 2002.<BR>IIRC, it was around $42/sheet, which was a pretty good price at the time,<BR>void free, relatively thick veneer compared to the higher wood boutique<BR>prices, and much heavier than what they sell as plywood at any BORG today.<BR><BR>I just got a quote from my hardwood dealer yesterday for 3/4"x4x8 A1 rift<BR>sawn red oak - $115.95/sheet; up $11/sheet since I bought the last load just<BR>about one year ago.<BR><BR>Inflation? ... what inflation?<BR><BR>-- <BR><A href="http://www.e-woodshop.net ">www.e-woodshop.net</A><BR>Last update:
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Swingman wrote:
> Inflation? ... what inflation?
Try energy costs.
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message ne

Tell me about it ... even the trades are putting "fuel cost" clauses in their bids the past two months.
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Swingman wrote:
> > Tell me about it ... even the trades are putting "fuel cost" clauses in > their bids the past two months.
"SurCharge" riders are nothing new.
Here in SoCal, been getting fuel surcharges on resin and glass deliveries the last 3-4 years. Usually $10/delivery.
Still remember when the Hunt brothers tried to corner the silver market.
Almost everything I sold that had silver contacts, carried a silver surcharge until things settled out.
Of course, back in the days of rampant inflation, "Price in effect at time of shipment" was popular.
There was no such thing as a quote good for 30 days.
Lew
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I started noticing fuel Surcharges when fuel prices hit the $1.50 mark 45 or so years ago. USP and Orkin started adding it to the bills.
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Really? Gas was a buck and a half a gallon in 1962??
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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What most Americans don't know is that the US currency is in the toilet. I run a Canadian company which has 99% of its income in US dollars. Our revenue is up but when converted to Canadian dollars it becomes less than years before. I used to get $1.60 Canadian for every one US dollar, now I only get $1.08 per US dollar and the experts say that the two currencies will be par by year end.
This means that whatever you bought a couple of years ago that was imported, now it is going to cost you almost 50% more today because the other currencies in the world have not dropped as much as the US dollar.
Home Depot, Wal-Mart and many others compensate by buying even cheaper crap so that the price doesn't go up, that is why the plywood is now pure junk.
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Just out of boredom, I went by HD at lunch today. This was in Fort Smith, Arkansas. I noticed they had two kinds of birch ply. One was labeled "3/4 inch birch plywood" and sold for 39.00. The other was labeled "3/4 inch Classic birch plywood" and sold for 29.00. Both were stamped "Made in China". I didn't ask what the difference was because I knew no one working there would know. Anyone have a clue? I miss Jerry's Home Center in Eugene Oregon.
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...

$10/sheet...
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This doesn't apply to countries that peg. China replaced the peg with a basket, but it's heavily weighted to the dollar and really hasn't had the same spread as other currencies.
scott
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EXT wrote: > What most Americans don't know is that the US currency is in the toilet. I > run a Canadian company which has 99% of its income in US dollars. <snip>
Didn't realize the Canadian situation; however, I can tell you that the USD is also in the tank vs the Euro.
Spending money you don't have, to finance a war, will do that.
Lew
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On Fri, 25 May 2007 23:15:23 GMT, Lew Hodgett

Congress has for decades been spending money it doesn't have. It really doesn't matter whether it's to finance wars or welfare.
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Chuck Taylor
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On Fri, 25 May 2007 18:55:34 -0500, Chuck Taylor

But it's only been since the Reagan years that we've seen multi-trillion dollar debt generated for absolutely nothing.
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Euro used to cost approximately $0.85 (at its low point). Now it costs $1.35 or so. That means that with respect to the euro, the dollar has lost close to 70% of its value. Of course, gasoline here in the US is still very cheap compared to Europe - about Euro 1.42 per liter in Wageningen, Netherlands. If I calculate correctly, that comes to ~US$7.30 per gallon, or more than twice the price in North Jersey.
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Don't most european countries subsidize mass transit (railroads) with gas taxes? I remember hearing this in Switzerland, but was under the impression many European countries do the same.
Actually, not a bad idea, at least for the northeast, southeast, Chicagoland, and So Cal. US.
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