Hinges - Silver - Where to find?

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I had a similar problem a few years ago. My solution was in fact a solution:- The Silver Solution! Made by Sheffco, it is a "Patented Formula for Plating and Re-plating Silver" It certainly does that, and as the instructions state, it can also be used on many other metals, but performs best on copper, brass, and not very well on mild steel. I also used it to plate some bullets to give to my kids to keep them safe from werewolves.You just can't be to careful, can you? Anyhow, in the U.K. it cost me 10, and it is available from:
SHEFFCO LTD. 50-52 CHANCERY LANE LONDON WC2A 1HL
TELE. 01-405-8868
I hope this helps
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I got some used fixer (from SWMBO -- the xray tech) and was going to try plating some brass hinges.
Let you know if it works - I am sure I have a battery and a nail here somewhere? Or a nickel if that doesn't work. :-))
Limey Lurker wrote:

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Will
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Will wrote:

Just a comment here but remember that silver tarnishes. And polishing it when it's tightly fitted to wood without staining the wood with the polish is likely to be a bear. You might want to take a look at nickel as an alternative--almost but not quite the same color and it tarnishes a lot less. It's also pretty tough stuff.
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--John
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wrote:

Silver is far too soft - they will break. Use nickel silver instead. You might well plate silver on top of this.
Silver-plated brass is a slightly lower cost, but much less quality. When the plating wears on the corners they're more obvious, as there's a colour contrast.
A convenient source of metal stock for making these in small quantities is old "EPNS" (electroplated nickel silver) tableknives from a charity shop. If you want bigger sheets of nickel silver, talk to the model railway people.
I can't help you with local .ca sources, but talking to a silversmith who works on teapots, jugs and the like rather than jewellery ought to help.
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Silver is harder and stronger than one might suppose. I still plan one day to cast some hinges in pure silver so they won't tarnish. These are going to be thick hinges. If you have ever seen the really nice thick solid brass hinges sold by woodworking supply places, well thats what I'm talking about. Sufficently heavy, I am convinced they will be fine. Sterling is used a lot for jewelry where weight, thus thickness is important. Same for holloware that has to be hard enough to be servicable. I believe a pure silver hinge thick enough will last a very long time indeed in a small decorative or jewelry box. Of course I may find out differently some day. What I plan to do is buy a good quality hinge and use it to make a rubber mold so I can make multiple waxes and then have a go at casting. Also on my want to do list is to inlay some pure silver wire into a small project as decoration. There's a name for that but I forget what is is. Breide or something like that. Lot's of Indian (not american indian) objects were donein this manner. Contrast between a dark wood and the light silver is really nice. BTW, most 'sterling silver' jewelery you buy nowadays has been rodium (sp?) plated so it wont tarnish. That explains the high shine you see.
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Pure silver will tarnish just as much as the sterling variety -- I have a few silver ingots (.9999 pure) that have a "nice" coating of black silver oxide.
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wrote:
Okay, I'm not trying to be contentious here, but. . .

Sterling silver is. Pure silver is a lot weaker and softer than sterling -- which is why silversmiths use sterling for most things. If you want to see what pure silver is like, play with some plain bezel wire sometime.

Oh they'll tarnish. It's just that pure silver tarnishes more slowly than steriling. But it still tarnishes.

For something like a jewelry box, the silver wouldn't have to be all that thick -- if you used sterling. You could probably use 18 gauge nicely.

I'm not entirely sure I understand what you mean here. The main reason most silversmiths use sterling is because it is considerably stronger and longer wearing than pure silver. Sterling is only about 7 percent copper so you don't save that much money by making a piece in sterling rather than pure silver -- that is if you could make the two pieces equally thick.
However you'd not only have to make the pure silver piece thicker, it would accumulate nicks and scratches much more quickly.

I think you're undoubtedly correct here.

There are many names for the technique because cultures from Japan to Norway have traditionally practiced it.
Inlaying silver wire into wood or metal is much easier than learning to cast.

BTW: A lot of that 'wire' inlay you see is actually strip silver (called 'bezel wire' in the trade which is inserted into cuts made with a jeweler's saw. I learned the technique from a friend of mine, a wonderful woman who sadly died in December.)

It makes for some beautiful pieces. Silver combines wonderfully with wood.

Onk? You get an absolute mirror finish on silver by simply polishing it correctly. I don't know about commercial products, but I know most silversmiths don't rhodium plate their pieces.
--RC (who has a couple of silver projects sitting on his bench right now)
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad
-- Suzie B
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<<Okay, I'm not trying to be contentious here, but>>
Of course not :) No problems here at all, mostly a matter of sematics.
Of course I was refering to commercial products (chains mostly) that are rhodium plated. They will never tarnish. Otherwise the jeweler would need to continually polish his stock to keep it shiney. Wasn't refering to hand made items by real smiths and I am aware that silver can be polished to a shine or a variety of other finishes applied. As far as bezel wire is concerned, it is so thin that sterling or fine silver bends about as easily. heavier gauge gets increasingly more difficult even in fine silver.. Suffice to say thay I work with fine (content, not craftsmanship necessarily) silver quite a bit for suitable applications. For stuff like earings or pins that that must be light and/or thin, then absolutely sterling is more suitable. Casting is pretty easy and I do a little using different methods. Having never done inlay, it appears more formidable. A matter of my ignorance I suppose.
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wrote:

Try wire inlay. It really isn't that difficult and it can add a lot of a project.
--RC
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad
-- Suzie B
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Enjoyed this exchange - as usual learned more than I bargained for.
Thank you all.
Will silver plate hinges as noted earlier. Next time I am in Durango I will look for some. If I find a source I will post it.
What's wrong with tomatoes in a fruit salad? Cherry Tomatoes that is? "-) Love 'em...
snipped-for-privacy@TAKEOUTmindspring.com wrote:

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Will
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You asked about Silver hinges, what size are they, and what gauge are they. and how many do you want?
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jewelry

You asked about Silver hinges, what size are they, and what gauge are they. and how many do you want? email snipped-for-privacy@silverandglass.com
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