Early Norm tool

Once again we're being treated to early (1991) NYW episodes. (I get giggle fits watching him drive screws with a corded drill!) Recently one episode showed him using an overhead router. What a beast! I don't think it hung around his workshop very long. Am I right in supposing it was more of an industrial than home woodworker type of toy?
FoggyTown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Guess I'm stuck in 1991 as I do not own a cordless tool. I know they would be more convenient, but I just don't feel like the hastle of the batteries - charging, finding one that has a charge, banging into the charger and it breaks on the floor, replacing them, etc, plus the expense of a battery powered tool. I suppose if I was in an area that was hard to get to a power plug, like many home-builders, I would probably buy one, but since I spend most of my time within easy reach of a plug, I guess I''ll put up with the inconvenience of corded tools. Rich
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

More power to you!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*snip double reply*

Yeah, but watch your step!
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RJDurkee wrote:

I don't see anything wrong with corded tools. They certainly have more power.
I have two cordless drills that have proved their convenience outside and on the roof, but when I had to hammer drill a ton of holes in my concrete basement walls for shelf standards and to hang a drainpipe for the A/C...I brought out the corded beast. An extension cord is much cheaper than a cordless drill battery.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wed, Sep 27, 2006, 9:33am (EDT-3) From: snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (RJDurkee) Guess I'm stuck in 1991 as I do not own a cordless tool. I know they would be more convenient, but I just don't feel like the hastle of the batteries - charging, finding one that has a charge, banging into the charger and it breaks on the floor, replacing them, etc, plus the expense of a battery powered tool. I suppose if I was in an area that was hard to get to a power plug, like many home-builders, I would probably buy one, but since I spend most of my time within easy reach of a plug, I guess I''ll put up with the inconvenience of corded tools. Rich
I own two cordless drills. One of my sons has one, the last I saw of it was right after I bought it actually I bought it so he could use it.. The second is in my shop, I've never even tried it out - and I still don't know why I bought it..
Both sons use cordless tools in their work, heating & air, and refrigeration, they work at sites with no electricity, period.
Me, I'm with you, as long as I've got extension cords and electricity I'll use corded tools. Personally I don't feel they're inconvenient at all. It's nice to be able to work for hours and the drill be just as powerful at the end as it was at the beginning, and no betteries to have to remember to charge, which is or isn't charged, etc.
I just remembered. I bought a cordless drill in 1975-76. Immediately thereafter bought a corded B&D drill, which i still have and still use. I don't knnow what happened to the cordless drill, and don't care.
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"?. - Granny Weatherwax
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

Umm . . . everyone missed the point about the corded drill. Every screw was over-torqued and made a racket while the bit spun around in the cross slots, probably chewing them up a bit. Not that it mattered for what he was building.
FoggyTown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thu, Sep 28, 2006, 3:53am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (foggytown) doth claimeth: Umm . . . everyone missed the point about the corded drill. <snip>
I didn't miss it. I ignored it. I don't drive screws with a dril - cordless, or corded.
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"?. - Granny Weatherwax
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

Remember, "Ignore is close to ignorance."

Uh huh. And I suppose you also make your wife slap your skivvies against a rock down by the river to clean them?
FoggyTown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thu, Sep 28, 2006, 10:07am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (foggytown) doth burbleth: Remember, "Ignore is close to ignorance." Uh huh. And I suppose you also make your wife slap your skivvies against a rock down by the river to clean them?
Remember, "ignore" isn't the only thing close to ignorance. When, and if, I drive screws, if a regular screwdriver won't cut it, I also own a Yankee screwdriver, about 50-75 years old, that works perfectly. And then there's always the brace, with screwdriver bits. I repeat: "I don't drive screws with a dril - cordless, or corded.".
Hmm, now that I ponder on it, I DO have two older cordless drills that I sometimes use, only for drilling holes tho, not for driving screws. One is possibly a Craftsman, no markings on it, excellent condition. The other is a Sogard, in almost as new condition. Oh yeah, they're both eggbeater drills. LOL
Haven't you heard? Concrete is the way to go now. That and running water have revolutionized the laundry world. Of course it's been 1975 since I've had clothes washed that way. Not to knock it until you've experienced it, gets clothes clean as any washing machine. And it's cordless.
All things are open to change.
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"?. - Granny Weatherwax
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm with you on that. The only cordless tool I have is a drill and that, only because of the clutch. I tend to overdrive screws with a corded drill so leave it to drilling holes and the cordless for the screws.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I seem to recall that at one time he had the overarm router accessory for the Shopsmith that he had for a time. That may be what you saw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I have seen almost none of the shows on a percentage basis, so can't come close to telling anybody what Nahm has/doesn't have/ever did, but at about that time Delta was pushing their (then) new overarm/underarm router. Whether they were sponsors at the time, I also have no idea.
In general, to OP, this was more investment than most homeshop guys had budget or space for, but particularly for pattern routing it was a great setup, particularly in the days before the large handheld routers that now make router tables much more capable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Where are you seeing these early shows ???
foggytown wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Any TV but first you have to have a time machine. :)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The world of television is the only thing in the Universe I know if with Time-shifting devices. They're amazing things, really. Something's on at one time, and you can't watch it then, so you time shift it in to the future! When the future becomes the present, you watch it, but you've got an excellent solution for commercials, a time distortion field. See those lines on the screen when using it? Time's actually moving faster on the TV!
It's no wonder so many people just let theirs flash 12:00. ;-)
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

He never had a Craftsman band saw. A Craftsman RAS, yes, but not a bandsaw.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wed, Sep 27, 2006, 7:45pm snipped-for-privacy@erehwon.com (TomWatson) doth strike a manley pose and did spaketh thusly: Ode to a Corded Drill <snip of saga-like prose>
You drink a LOT of coffee, don'tcha Tom?
JOAT You'll never get anywhere if you believe what you "hear". What do you "know"?. - Granny Weatherwax
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"foggytown" wrote...

There's a lot you can do with a modern router table that used to be with overhead or pin routers. There's still a lot that pin routers do best, but not so much that the average home-shop guy would think he needs one. Also they've become somewhat obscure, and a lot of guys aren't exactly sure what they'd do with one, and they look a little intimidating.
I've always liked using big Onsrud industrial pin routers; I find them to be safe to use & easy to set up, and they are ideal for making small moldings, any kind of radiused moldings, round muntins and the like, also for hogging out any shape you can think of.
-- Timothy Juvenal www.tjwoodworking.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.