Bugger!

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Little bro came by yesterday, doing an interesting job at the moment, seems one place is being demolished, and a lot of old hard wood is being burnt, inc.some rose wood, teak and oak, burnt? yep gov't won't allow it to be sold, incase someone makes a profit! Good Lord how I hate that kind of waste, typical British Gov't/Royal Navy attitude!
niel.
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I guess you couldn't negotiate to take it away for free, saving them the labour? Or would that have involved you having to do the entire job?
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Upscale wrote:

No, total destruction on-site required!
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On Mon, 11 Oct 2004 15:09:36 +0100, "njf>badger<"

And I suspect the ironic thing is that the folks who came up with that policy also are very vocal in promoting "conservation" and anti-growth/anti-production causes.
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Niel: Given the Royal Navy's long record of "enlightened self-interest" re its contractors*, it is easy to understand the origin of the policy. Furthermore, given the great tradition of "too much is not enough" re government's corrective actions, the burn-on-site regulation is also understandable. However, understandable and reasonable are two different things, eh?
Bob * See Patrick O'Brien's well-researched fiction for examples.
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Bob Schmall wrote:

"Nay never lift up your hands to me There's no clean hands in the trade. But steal in measure quoth Brigantine There's measure in all things made." "King Henry VIII and the Shipwrights" -- Rudyard Kipling
Wonder if anyone would notice if some of that wood just walked off?
--RC
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On Mon, 11 Oct 2004 13:28:01 +0100, "njf>badger<"

Lot of that on this side of the pond as well.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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njf>badger< wrote:

My dad used to work on an Airforce Base. They would hall piles of unused Parachute cord to the dump on base and burn it. If you got caught taking some of it home you were fired. Nice cord too, lots of uses on the farm.
--

Gerald Ross, Cochran, GA
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"Gerald Ross" wrote in message

Akin to zero tolerance for those who won't or can't think ... heaven forbid there should be a chance of corruption at any level but the highest.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/04/04
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That would make sense in that you could not go into the parachute business and make an unsafe chute and sue the cord provider. I would imagine there is a safe way to make it unusable for a parachute but still be good for cordage.
There was a lawsuit when a manufacturer of auto accessories trashed some defective parts. An enterprising employee took them, sold them at a flea market, and someone had an accident because of them. He sued and won.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

That explains Ford punching holes with a fork lift through every panel of any bodies they fail in the local van plant, can't have anyone recovering them for repairing their vans....One Ford rep. took to dancing on panels that had small defects in their dealers bodyshops after he'd approved FOC replacements, one body fitter took exception as he needed a wing for his own car, but couldn't afford a new one, IIRC the rep ended up wearing it!
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Gerald Ross wrote:

Std. mil. bullshit!
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wrote:

Most of this goes back to the contracts under which things are purchased. A *lot* of military stuff is purchased at very low prices because of the high volume. The manufacturer knows that much of it will be used a short period of time before being "removed from service". What they want to prevent is someone ordering a bunch of stuff then flooding the market with lightly used material. The military could actually mess up quite a few markets with their waste if they were allowed to. It is nothing more than a price supports thing.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Tim Douglass wrote:

This certainly isn't true in Britain. The military is charged obscene prices by the manufacturers.
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Bob Martin responds:

If it's true in the U.S., the change has come about in the past month.
Charlie Self "Doublethink means the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one's mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them." George Orwell
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Bob Martin wrote:

And the building concerned is many hundreds of years old!
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On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 16:52:42 +0100, "njf>badger<"

You might actually be surprised. In the U.S. there is always a lot of talk about $600 toilet seats and stuff, but I worked with an accountant who was in supply in the National Guard. During the first Gulf War he processed a lot of stuff and showed me what some of the prices were - a lot of things at 50% or less of civilian price, gas was only about 10%. Some things are pretty high priced, and those are the ones we hear about, but overall the pricing is awfully good.

That, of course is a different issue and has to do with stupid policy makers.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Tim Douglass wrote:

Exactly!
Niel.
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Bob Martin wrote:

If it's like the US it depends on the item and the volume and the manufacturer.
For one-offs the prices can be very high due to administrative overhead--we had one guy whose full time job it was to keep up with the changes in the specification for an assembly that one of our techs could make from scratch in a couple of days.
Then there are the small-business set-asides, where a certain amount of contracting has to go to small or minority-owned businesses--some of those businesses are very, very good, but many barely meet the requirements to bid--nonetheless they get the preference on some items because there's a more critical item that they need to procure from a more capable contractor. So they have a lot of costs involved in meeting the spec and keeping up the paperwork that a more established contractor doing larger volume would not.
But if it's something like 100,000 A/N bolts then the price is generally pretty low.
When you hear about things like $600 toilet seats there's generally more to the story.
--
--John
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Quite true! A number of years ago there was a bunch of noise in the press about a $200 screw driver. This screwdriver was part of a tool kit that contained everything from basic hand tools to a sophisticated electronic test set that was quite expensive. The "investigative" reporter came up with the $200 dollar screwdriver by taking the price of the tool kit and dividing it by the number of items in it! Using this method, the electronic test set also cost $200, which was a huge bargain!
Grant
"J. Clarke" wrote:

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