Basic question about jointers

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I have a grizzly 12 inch jointer and the only way I can "justify" it is by sawing my own lumber. If you use a buncha rough stock, then a bigger jointer is better, you must have a dust system and 220 to run a jointer this big. All the other problems with glue up, cup, etc can be worked around well with a good 8 or 6 inch jointer. Its just a question of what you want.
imho Schroeder

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wrote:

here is where hand tools really come in. with a scrub plane you can quickly get enough of the sup/twist/bow out of the board to run it through the planer. a scrub plane will cost you $20 on ebay and an hour or two of cleaning and sharpening. and it'll fit in a shoe box.

you really should look into designs using hardwood veneered plywood and solid edge banding and face frames.
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skipsizemore wrote:

Well, a couple of things to consider: - Usually, 12" wide boards are either not available, or only at a serious premium, or crap. This is not always the case, though; you might have a sweet deal - Boards that wide are going to be a lot bigger PITA then you might think, *especially* for shelves *if* those shelves are not in a dado (eg adjustable shelving). You will joint an plane them, put them in the bookcase and they won't be flat anymore. Wide boards are a non trivial exercise to work with. I am willing to bet that in quite a few cases, that shelves only sitting on pins could be jointed an planed several times over quite a few days before they stay totally flat on their own.

It is an awesome price, especially if it comes 12"+ wide.
> I'm going to make the normally unseen back

How are you attaching said backs? Solid wood backs can be .... troublesome in the long run if they are fully glued on. Or even medium run.
PK
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I'm not sure what you mean by "the planer has enough work to do just feeding and cutting a wide piece of hardwood". Removing the cup is certainly no more strain on the planer--just a couple of extra passes, at less than full load. Before passing on this approach, I strongly encourage you to give it a try, even if on a junk SPF 1x10. Particularly if cup is what you are dealing with--that is the easiest form of warp to fix on the planer, IMHO. That is because your "sled" doesn't need any rigidity along its length. A 12" MDF shelf from the Borg is perfect for this. Just put your board on the carrier MDF, concave side down, with a few spacers under the center (I'd run 1" wide stock 1' long through the planer to get just the right thickness, and put a spacer every 2' or 3' of board length, with each spacer milled to the right thickness for its location.) Run this "package" through your planer, taking light cuts near the end, until it is planing full width. Then flip and plane the other side w/o the sled.
Then sticker it and wait to see how much bow returns, possibly in the opposite direction. Then repeat. Or get it locked into the structure of your project.
The second paragraph applies no matter how you remove the cup from a wide board. And to a lesser extent, any warpage. Someone else here mentioned that if you don't have structure to keep the cup out, it is likely to return, even if the wood is perfectly stable, just due to seasonal movement.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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skipsizemore wrote:

Seems you're only considering one of the functions of a jointer and the less common one at that.
Primarily, jointers are used to edge-joint edges of surfaced-two-sides (S2S) lumber. This operation is typically in preparation for edge-gluing two or more pieces together to make a wider surface. In this function, a longer bed is better as you'll be able to remove the cup from longer boards.
For the function of face-jointing (the one you described) wider is better, but a 6 or 8 inch wide jointer can handle 12 or 16 inch wide boards. Also, unless you're starting with fallen trees, most stock is typically in the 6"-8" range.
~Mark.
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Woody wrote:

Not properly, and with no way to select how the knives address the grain.
Jointing half of one side and turning the board to face joint the other is simply not the same as properly face jointing the whole board.
Barry
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