10" TS blades

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On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 13:53:11 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

2012 11:24:44 PM UTC-7, Upscale wrote: >> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 22:34:10 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com" >You will find that ripping (cutting with te grain direction) will be much better with a rip blade. Never went the ripping blade route. I've always used a 60 tooth combination blade. Did fine for ripping and crosscut nicely on the veneered plywood. > > To each his own I guess. I might leave in a cross cut blade if I have one rip. Rarely use a rip for cross cuts, unless they are not so important. Rip blades do cut about twice as fast. Takes me less than a minute to change blades and just kind of do it without thinking. I doubt you can rip cherry with a cross cut very often without some burn. But as I said, to each his own. > The trick to not changing blades is to use a combination or general purpose blade. I would not recommend cross cutting with a rip nor ripping with a cross cut blade. Now if you have

(good enough is OK) jobs and not the typical furniture pieces I am usually building. And even then only because the cabinet guys usually oversize their face frame rips and clean up the edges in bundles ganged up in the planer.

Out of curiousity have you ever tried a WWII Blade. Just curious if you've felt you were doing better with the other blades.
Mike M
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On 10/11/2012 11:41 PM, Mike M wrote:

2012 11:24:44 PM UTC-7, Upscale wrote: >> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 22:34:10 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com" >You will find that ripping (cutting with te grain direction) will be much better with a rip blade. Never went the ripping blade route. I've always used a 60 tooth combination blade. Did fine for ripping and crosscut nicely on the veneered plywood. > > To each his own I guess. I might leave in a cross cut blade if I have one rip. Rarely use a rip for cross cuts, unless they are not so important. Rip blades do cut about twice as fast. Takes me less than a minute to change blades and just kind of do it without thinking. I doubt you can rip cherry with a cross cut very often without some burn. But as I said, to each his own. > The trick to not changing blades is to use a combination or general purpose blade. I would not recommend cross cutting with a rip nor ripping with a cross cut blade. Now if you have

similar (good enough is OK) jobs and not the typical furniture pieces I am usually building. And even then only because the cabinet guys usually oversize their face frame rips and clean up the edges in bundles ganged up in the planer.

IIRC he mentioned using a Forrest blade and IIRC Forrest does not make a rip blade. So my "guess" is that he has used a Forrest General cut blade, maybe not. If he was not happy with the results of a WWII "something" was not right.
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wrote:

10, 2012 11:24:44 PM UTC-7, Upscale wrote: >> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 22:34:10 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com" >You will find that ripping (cutting with te grain direction) will be much better with a rip blade. Never went the ripping blade route. I've always used a 60 tooth combination blade. Did fine for ripping and crosscut nicely on the veneered plywood. > > To each his own I guess. I might leave in a cross cut blade if I have one rip. Rarely use a rip for cross cuts, unless they are not so important. Rip blades do cut about twice as fast. Takes me less than a minute to change blades and just kind of do it without thinking. I doubt you can rip cherry with a cross cut very often without some burn. But as I said, to each his own. > The trick to not changing blades is to use a combination or general purpose blade. I would not recommend cross cutting with a rip nor ripping with a cross cut blade. Now if you ha

similar (good enough is OK) jobs and not the typical furniture pieces I am usually building. And even then only because the cabinet guys usually oversize their face frame rips and clean up the edges in bundles ganged up in the planer.

I found Deb's recent results interesting. (No defined increase in quality of cuts over a cheaper blade, at least initially. But we all know that cheaper blades don't last as long.)
-- Energy and persistence alter all things. --Benjamin Franklin
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On Thursday, October 11, 2012 9:41:09 PM UTC-7, Mike M wrote:
hoo.com> wrote: >On Thursday, October 11, 2012 12:51:21 PM UTC-7, Leon wrot=e: >> On 10/11/2012 1:18 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote: > On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 11:24:44 PM UTC-7, Upscale wrote: >> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 22:34:10 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com" >You will find that ripping (cutting with te grain direction) will be much better with a rip blade. Never went the ripping blade route. I've always used a 60 tooth combination blade. Did fine for ripping and crosscut nicely on the veneered plywood. > > To each his own I guess. I might leave in a cross cut blade if I have one rip. Rarely use a rip for cross cuts, unless they are not so important. Rip blades do cut about twice as fast. Takes me less than a minute to change blades and just kind of do it without thinking. I doubt you can rip cherry with a cross cut very often without some burn. But as I said, to each his own. > The trick to not changing blades is to use a combination or general purpose blade. I would not recommend cross cutting with a rip nor ripping with a cross cut blade. Now if you have >2 table saw, that might change considerations. > >IMNSHO combo blades are only approriate for basic cabinet work or other similar (good enough is OK) jobs and not the typical furniture pieces I am usually building. And even then only because the cabinet guys usually oversize their face frame rips and clean up the edges in bundles ganged up in the planer. > >I have one I throw on when making plywood boxes, etc. for around the shop or sets and stage furniture for my daughters school, etc. Out of curiousity have you ever tried a WWII Blade. Just curious if you've felt you were doing better with the other blades. Mike M Yes I have used Forests. Mostly loved them. I get pretty much the same results from full kerf Freuds but I do recall some fricking glass like smooth cross cuts with a Woodworker cross cut (maybe 60 tooth) blade. I have never done side-by-side. I keep my blades sharp. Probably feels like Forests hold an edge longer but I am usually buying a few blades at a time and like to save a few bucks.
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On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 22:05:21 -0700, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

I've never owned a Forrest blade but a year or two back I bought Freud's then new "Fusion" blade. I don't see how any other blade could cut any smoother. Can't yet testify to longevity - as a hobby woodworker it takes me a while to dull a blade.
My only quibble is that it's ATB and not ATBR.
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On 10/12/2012 11:28 AM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

I have heard similar comments about HF blades. The Forrest is good for tens of thousands of cuts with the same quality of cut.

I had 2 WWII blades, got another about 2 years ago and had one of the older ones ground to cut flat bottom groves. Perhaps you could have it reground.
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On 10/11/2012 09:41 PM, Mike M wrote:

2012 11:24:44 PM UTC-7, Upscale wrote: >> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 22:34:10 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com" >You will find that ripping (cutting with te grain direction) will be much better with a rip blade. Never went the ripping blade route. I've always used a 60 tooth combination blade. Did fine for ripping and crosscut nicely on the veneered plywood. > > To each his own I guess. I might leave in a cross cut blade if I have one rip. Rarely use a rip for cross cuts, unless they are not so important. Rip blades do cut about twice as fast. Takes me less than a minute to change blades and just kind of do it without thinking. I doubt you can rip cherry with a cross cut very often without some burn. But as I said, to each his own. > The trick to not changing blades is to use a combination or general purpose blade. I would not recommend cross cutting with a rip nor ripping with a cross cut blade. Now if you have

similar (good enough is OK) jobs and not the typical furniture pieces I am usually building. And even then only because the cabinet guys usually oversize their face frame rips and clean up the edges in bundles ganged up in the planer.

I have a WW and a WWII for the RAS and the TS. I love 'em both, but I have found that a good rip blade on the TS helps immensely when ripping redwood. It is much faster and doesn't build up resin nearly as fast as the WWII.
I rip a load of 8' 2x6 redwood and plough out a 1" x 7/8" centered groove (with a dado stack) on 8' 2.5" wide lengths every month to supply hand railings for metal RV deck/stairs for a RV accessory manufacturer. I route a 1/2" radius on all four edges. He cuts to length and finishes as orders come in.
Pays green fees...
http://www.hofmannccr.com/rvproducts/decks.htm
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We should all be so lucky to be able to afford two table saws *and* have a large enough shop to be able to use them.
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We just moved into a house with a 2000 ft^2 basement but there are a *lot* of toys I want to buy before even thinking about another table saw. Changing blades isn't all that tough. ;-)
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On 10/11/2012 7:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Changing blade is not tough but changing set ups can be a PIA.
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On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 20:45:51 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Given (reasonable) aspirations for a workshop, I'd want a shop big enough to house several machines the size of a decent Felder table saw. It would have to be capable of handing entire 8' sheets of ply and completely outfitted with a power feeder.
Punch a couple of numbers into a computer screen and then watch it happen.
This one would do. :) http://www.format-4.ca/products_features.php?parent 5e5cc98dc03df70393&xat_codee29b2ff457bc0b6430&region-us
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On 10/12/2012 2:42 AM, Dave wrote:

http://www.format-4.ca/products_features.php?parent 5e5cc98dc03df70393&xat_codee29b2ff457bc0b6430&region-us
     I think I would opt for going totally CNC if room were not a factor, I think less waste might be a plus factor.
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I (think) I know what CNC can do, but my main woodworking desire is the easiest way to slice up veneered plywood. Cabinet making is my main focus with woodworking.
CNC is a whole other ball game.
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On 10/12/2012 12:42 AM, Dave wrote:

http://www.format-4.ca/products_features.php?parent 5e5cc98dc03df70393&xat_codee29b2ff457bc0b6430&region-us
While attending the Atlanta IWF a few years back, I got to feel one of those saws. The slider moves with one finger and very little pressure.
I also got to touch a big ass Felder(similar saw) http://www.felderusa.com/us-us/products/table-saws.html and of course these big boys: http://www.northfieldwoodworking.com/tablesaws/4saw.htm
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On 10/11/2012 12:34 AM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

constrained. For 10+ years I've been running with: Freud 10" Carbide Finishing 40 Tooth Advanced Anti-Kickback Design and haven't done too badly. Rockler currently has: Freud 2-pack of 10" Rip and Fine Crosscut ... $40 #47943 How much of an improvement (if any) might the new blades make? Speculation is encouraged. Thx, Will

better with a rip blade. Any serious WWkr with a TS should at least have a rip and cross cut blade. I use Freud blades quite a bit. I think maybe a more expensive version, that sounds like a heck of a deal. +1
I use a Forrest WWII for all critical projects crosscuts (combination blade, but still cuts sterling crosscuts), and a Freud Glue-Line-Rip for all critical project rips to dimension after jointing.
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On Thursday, October 11, 2012 7:18:28 AM UTC-7, Swingman wrote:
When those glue line rips first came out I did seem to have some success. With my saw stop I have that fence dialed in with just a few thou lean out on and I still get teeth marks on my rips with that blade or any thin kerf actually. I checked for run out and there is esentially none. I actually returned a glue line saying it was flawed and was just going to get my money back but the sad looking Woodcraft owner got me to agree to swap for another one. I went back the next day and bought a full kerf ripper and have glass like rips ever since. I guess I am just a softee. Still have the glue line but it has worked its way to the back of the stack on the blade nail next to the saw.
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On 10/11/2012 1:23 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

2012 4:54:36 PM UTC-7, Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote: >> I'm just a hobbyist, make little organizers, odds and ends. Very much budget constrained. For 10+ years I've been running with: Freud 10" Carbide Finishing 40 Tooth Advanced Anti-Kickback Design and haven't done too badly. Rockler currently has: Freud 2-pack of 10" Rip and Fine Crosscut ... $40 #47943 How much of an improvement (if any) might the new blades make? Speculation is encouraged. Thx, Will > > You will find that ripping (cutting with te grain direction) will be much better with a rip blade. Any serious WWkr with a TS should at least have a rip and cross cut blade. I use Freud blades quite a bit. I think maybe a more expensive version, that sounds like a heck of a deal. +1 I use a Forrest WWII for all critical projects crosscuts (combination blade, but still cuts sterling crosscuts), and a Freud Glue-Line-Rip for all critical project rips to dimension after jointing. -- www.eWoodShop.com Last update: 4/15/2010 KarlCaillouet@ (the obvious) http://gplus.to/eWoodShop

my saw stop I have that fence dialed in with just a few thou lean out on and I still get teeth marks on my rips with that blade or any thin kerf actually. I checked for run out and there is esentially none. I actually returned a glue line saying it was flawed and was just going to get my money back but the sad looking Woodcraft owner got me to agree to swap for another one. I went back the next day and bought a full kerf ripper and have glass like rips ever since. I guess I am just a softee. Still have the glue line but it has worked its way to the back of the stack on the blade nail next to the saw.

The problem with the thin kerf is that they may measure out fine, they are not spinning, but once spinning they may no longer run true. Additionally unless you are working with perfect lumber that is equal in hardness all the way through, is there such a thing, the thin kerf blades will flex to some degree often to a great degree when they go to the hard and soft spots.
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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote in message
On Thursday, October 11, 2012 7:18:28 AM UTC-7, Swingman wrote:

When those glue line rips first came out I did seem to have some success. With my saw stop I have that fence dialed in with just a few thou lean out on and I still get teeth marks on my rips with that blade or any thin kerf actually. I checked for run out and there is esentially none. I actually returned a glue line saying it was flawed and was just going to get my money back but the sad looking Woodcraft owner got me to agree to swap for another one. I went back the next day and bought a full kerf ripper and have glass like rips ever since. I guess I am just a softee. Still have the glue line but it has worked its way to the back of the stack on the blade nail next to the saw. ==================================================================================================================================I have been using a full kerf glue line rip for some time. Works great. They do make that blade in two thicknesses.
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On Thursday, October 11, 2012 7:01:27 PM UTC-7, CW wrote:
I should try that. I usually pick up blades at local Woodcraft. I like to support the guy but his inventory is pretty weak. Usually never has the blades I want. Offers to order them but why bother. I just go home and order it myself online if it is something O can wait for. Never saw the full kerf glue line there.
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On 10/11/2012 1:23 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

my saw stop I have that fence dialed in with just a few thou lean out on and I still get teeth marks on my rips with that blade or any thin kerf actually. Although I do own one special purpose thin kerf, as a general rule I don't use thin kerf blades ... the Freud blade I was referring to is 1/8" kerf, Glue-Line-Rip.
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