What size electrical junction box fits a 1-inch diameter cable anyway?

Page 5 of 7  
wrote:

If you really want SS bolts through your motor, buy some #8 or #10 threaded rod and put nuts on both sides.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 21 May 2013 16:42:08 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

Funny you should mention that... as I called AO Smith technical support today (800-262-6484) to nail down thru-bolt specifications.
It turns out these bolts are, just as you suggested, #8x32, of varying lengths depending on the length of the motor itself.
Specifically, they are "8x32 UNC rolled thread" (whatever that means), of 0.272" in diameter, with only the last 1 inch threaded, and with a 1/4 inch hex head.
In case someone else needs it, here are the lengths for my motors: AO Smith QC1102 1.65HP(net) 09.38" long thru bolts (P/N 606202-071) AO Smith U27-881 1.65HP(net) 10.25" long thru bolts AO Smith U27-884 2.20HP(net) 10.25" long thru bolts AO Smith SQ1152 2.20HP(net) 10.75" long thru bolts
Googling for the AO Smith part number 606202-071, I find they're $4 each at http://www.inyopools.com/Products/07501352042244.htm $3.30 each at http://www.poolproducts.com/SPP/productr.asp?pf_idR70-45 $2.57 each at http://www.aqua-man.com/row_num.asp?Ic –689 and they have a description of: A.O. Smith Motor Thru-Bolt, 8-32 x 9-3/8" x 2" Thread
So, like Oren with the huckleberries, when you say #8 stainless steel through bolts, I should come 'a runnin', cuz, you're on the money.
BTW, would there be any "galvanic" problem with stainless steel threaded into aluminum?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not usually, unless you are dunking it in salt water. If you are worried smear some TefGel on it (the stuff boat guys use)
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 21, 8:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

+1
galvanic corrosion requires an electrolyte... mostly absent in CA.
DDD- Plus galvanic corrosion follows the area rule...look it up.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/22/2013 1:12 AM, DD_BobK wrote:

really? there's no salt water vapor in the air near the coasts in CA?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 22 May 2013 10:06:30 -0700, chaniarts

Not enough to set up any significant galvanic corrosion from 18-8 or 304 SS and aluminum. (just a little white powder at the joint) TefGel will prevent that. 316 won't be a problem at all even in salt water.
I can show you pictures of a 40 year old salt water pontoon boat to show you both.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/22/2013 11:45 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

well, i can't show you pictures, but my boat had steel bolts through an Al tube, and i had to drill the bolt out, leaving an oversized eaten away hole. this is a boat that is used 95% in fresh water, sits in my yard in the AZ desert (low humidity), and sees salt water maybe once/year.
i use something for dissimilar metals every time i change out something now.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 22 May 2013 12:00:56 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

Certainly the soft steel bolts stick like they're welded onto the aluminum of the motor! Proof is in the pictures prior.
So, would standard gray automotive anti-seize paste work to prevent this with the steel on aluminum?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Get TefGel. They have it online or at a decent boat store or hardware store. I doubt it is necessary on a pool pump tho if you have stainless bolts.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 22 May 2013 10:06:30 -0700, chaniarts

Judging by the cars out there, no.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 21 May 2013 23:45:04 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

Googling, for how TefGel differs from my basic automotive anti-seize, this explains the action of Ultra Safety Systems TefGel between aluminum and stainless steel: http://www.tefgel.com/contain.php?param=tefgel_infor
Tefgel is apparently half PTFE with zero petroleum solvents to evaporate and no silicone or lanolin.
Apparently it works simply by filling voids, that stay filled, so that no electrolytes can touch the dissimilar metals.
Apparently the standard gray anti-seize contains "lanolin", at least according to this web site: http://www.sailorssolutions.com/index.asp?page=ProductDetails&Item=TG01
That would explain why you guys, who have more experience than I (I have none) suggest TefGel over the standard automotive stuff.
One question: If tefgel works on SS+AL, wouldn't it also work on the original plain old steel bolts into the aluminum motor housing?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I imagine it would.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 21 May 2013 16:42:08 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

One correction. We only need a 1/4" #8x32 nut on one side.
BTW, if anyone needs to know, calling AO Smith technical support turns out not to be an easy endeavor, until you try it once.
Googling, you'll find 800-433-2545 listed as the best number, but that turns out to be a division that was sold to waterheaterparts.com, and not the motor division.
They'll tell you that AO Smith technical support is at 800-527-1953, which it is, but not for motors. That company is now called hotwater.com.
Finally, that number above will tell you the *real* technical support number for A.O. Smith motors, which is 800-262-6484.
This is a company called "Regal", who has a division called "Century" (centuryelectricmotor.com) which owns the AO Smith brand.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

try Liquid Wrench
consider replacing long / small diameter bolts with SS threaded rod (McMaster) & Loctited (red) nut at one end or loose nuts at both ends

n our footsteps. <<<
More likely NOT follow as to avoid the land mines, wasted time, poison oak rash, dog poo & conduit trip hazard.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I understand that most people leave pool pumps and even shallow well pumps out in the weather but they will last many times longer if you can put them inside. My spa pumps are 25 years old and still going strong (in the garage) I ended up building a car port sort of thing over my pool equipment and it is doing a lot better now. Weather will kill these things pretty quick;y. If I lived up there in the frozen north my pumps would be cord and plug connected with unions on the pipes so I could take them inside when I closed the pool.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 20 May 2013 21:50:26 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

I understand. And agree.
I've never built a shed, but that's exactly what I need. I would add some room to store the chemicals and equipment also. If I ever got industrious, it would even have a warm shower. I'm not sure if the heater requires special ventilation though.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You really do not want your chemicals in the pump house. They outgas chlorine and will eat up the metal parts
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 21 May 2013 16:44:11 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

OK. Makes sense. thanks.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 17 May 2013 14:48:55 -0700, Oren wrote:

I'm back from camping with the kids and will see if I can fix that leak on Monday.
The odd thing is that I don't see how simply removing the halves of the pump would make the seals leak; but something must be leaking.
Interestingly, I've never replaced the seals, so I'll look for a DIY on the net for the Sta-Rite Max-e-Glas II pumps.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 16 May 2013 09:15:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Thanks for the advice (Oren & Bob said the same thing).
I agreed with that assessment, so I ripped out all the conduit and wire I had put in, bought new wire, and cut new conduit.

Picked up some new two-piece straight-through connectors, and rewired it to what you were so kindly suggesting.

With all the cutting of the conduit, I found this irrigation pipe cutter works well, and is just the right size:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.