what coffee maker won't I have to repurchase in a few years?

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Couple years ago the girlie bought a new Mr. Coffee "thermal" coffeemaker because she liked the eco-friendliness of not having a heating element under the carafe, and also it had a timer so you could set it up the night before.
Fast forward to recently - the lid of the carafe doesn't pour nicely anymore. Would like to buy a new lid, or a new carafe if I had to. Well, it's not available on Mr. Coffee's online store which is apparently run by a third party. When I contacted them, they basically said "if it ain't on the web site, we don't sell it" and suggested I contact Mr. Coffee customer service. Which I did, something like four days ago, with no response yet.
So... is there another brand of coffeemaker that wouldn't leave me high and dry like this? Or should I just give up on the "thermal" thing altogether and buy the cheapest regular coffeemaker with a timer that I can find, so I don't have to worry about a specific carafe?
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Or just give up on the plastic crap and buy a single-burner Bunn like you have in the break room at work. Expensive, but it will outlive you. And replacement carafes are available at pretty much any restaurant supply. Or for a more realistic answer, just get one of those cone-shape deals where the filter and coffee fit in the top, and a teakettle for the stove. Set it up the night before, and while you are brushing teeth, wander out to kitchen and flip the burner on. By the time you are out of the shower, the water will be hot enough to pour.
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I 2nd the Bunn Pour-O-Matic....A pot of coffee is never more than 3 minutes away....Even using the hell out of it (3+ pots a day) it lasts for years...Have gone through a couple in the last 15 or so years and love them...About a hundered bucks or so..Just replaced the old one...Got the new one at Walmart.....HTH....
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wrote:

I bought one for our office. It didn't last a year. Didn't make very good coffee either. Replaced it with an $18 noname from some discount place, coffee tastes as good or better and it's still chugging along 3 years later. No more expensive coffee makers if I buy them.
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wrote:

I believe a good cup of joe has to do how the coffee is made, rather than the kind of maker (or its value). I used to make coffee at a restaurant, and everyone told ME that I made the best coffee! My "secret," as strange as it is in this case, was that I watered the coffee down a little (maybe 15%) with plain hot tap water which was enough to remove some bitter taste. It helps to have a clean maker, clean pot, and freshly ground French-roast beans too.
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wrote:

It's not recommended to drink hot water from the tap. It is not as "plain" as you think.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

From what tap? From mine? And is cold water OK but hot water bad?
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wrote:

ANY tap. Yes, cold water is okay, while hot water is not.
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On Sun, 18 Oct 2009 13:35:29 -0400, salty wrote:

I had a friend once who would only drink cold water from downstairs taps - the upstairs being typically gravity-fed via a holding tank, and she was paranoid about critters getting into the tank and dying :-)
Always been told the thing about hot, too, but I think it depends on the temperature of the water. I'll still drink hot water (in tea, coffee etc.) but only if it's been boiled first.
cheers
Jules
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On Mon, 19 Oct 2009 08:01:45 -0500, Jules

As far as I know, boiling will do nothing to remove the lead.
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On Mon, 19 Oct 2009 09:15:53 -0400, salty wrote:

Wouldn't have thought so - but it should get rid of any living nasties that may survive in the tank if the temperature's not high enough (although I've no idea how long the water needs to sit in the tank before it's an issue - with three kids in the house always wanting showers things circulate through pretty quickly :-)
I'm less bothered about non-living crap in there as I would have thought that's just as likely to be in the cold supply, too.
cheers
Jules
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Phisherman wrote:

I learned to add a pinch of salt if it's bitter. Just a pinch.
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As any connoisseur knows, the secret is the temperature of the water. If too hot, it leaches out the oil where the bitterness lies. Water from 180 to 190 is right. Percolated coffee above that temperature is bitter. Drip coffee brewed with too hot of water is also bitter, no matter the grounds.
YW
Steve
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minutes
new
I suspect you have "gone through" them as you didn't bother to mend them. There is not much to go wrong on these and what could go wrong is very simple to fix.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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I still have the old one that just died after 7-8 years in the garage , want me to send it to you ?? I have more important things to do than frig with an old coffee maker...Like watching paint dry...
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40 posts and not one mention of a French Press.
I have a glass Bodum that feels fragile but makes a great pot. My weekend press is a Nissan stainless thermos press. It holds about 4-5 mugs. My work press is a Bodum clear insulated travel mug. It is ideal because my workplace requires clear bags, no pockets, etc.
I have a hot water dispenser both at home and at work, both using filtered water. I grind my beans every morning and it really is the best coffee going. And very quick / simple. I will never go back to electric or gas. Ever.
Buy a French Press.
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wrote:

I have several Bodums, and love the coffee that comes out of them. It really is a superior method to anything else. There are a few minor drawbacks, though. One is that once the coffee is brewed, you cannot let it stand in the Bodum, even for a few minutes, as it continues to get stronger and stronger. The other problem is if you need more than one or two cups of coffee. I don't think I've ever seen a 10 or 12 cup Bodum!
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On Sat, 17 Oct 2009 20:25:37 -0400, in alt.home.repair, "benick"

I had a Pour-O-Matic. It does make a decent pot, and does it quickly. Unfortunately I had trouble with mine: first, hit with a series of manufacturer recalls, it seems like I spent more time sending it back and unpacking the new one than I did using it. Finally, after about a year of use on the last one, it developed a charming habit of blowing the circuit breaker every couple of days or so. Turns out that the tank heater tube had corroded through, exposing the contents of the water tank to live electrical parts. Apparently it had been resistance-heating the water itself, rather than the nichrome wire, for some time....
After that I wasn't enjoying my $100+ investment anymore. I put it on a shelf in the garage and bought a little 4-cup maker from Shopko for $15. It's slow, but economical for making the one big cuppa mud that I drink every day.
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Don't get one with a timer - that's just one more thing that can go wrong. Get a separate timer; the kind that the pot plugs into and in turn plugs into the wall. My timer, so far, has outlived three ten-dollar coffee pots.
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Make it by hand. Boil water in a pot on the stove, remove pot from stove, add coffee, and let it sit for a minute or two. Finally, pour it through a filter cone into whatever receiving vessel holds your coffee before it goes into your mug.
I use a quart-sized mason jar as my receiver, and one of those gold filters in the cone. Makes an outstanding cup of coffee, far better than any coffee maker.
Jon
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