Solder or crimp ??

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On Sat, 28 Dec 2013 19:08:06 -0500, Stormin Mormon

In aircraft wiring it is crimp only - no solder because solder wicking back the wire stiffens the wire, and any flex gets concentrated at that point - breaking the wire.
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On Sat, 28 Dec 2013 22:04:22 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Bingo!
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On 12/28/2013 6:08 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I have a ratcheting type crimp tool and have used low temperature silver on crimped connectors if I'm worried about moisture wicking into the stranded wire plus heat shrink that has the hot melt sticky stuff on the inside. Regular heat shrink tubing makes a good strain relief on the wire crimped into a connector because it prevents a sharp 90° bend in the wire crimped into the connector when it's put under stress. The most important thing, don't nick the wire when you strip the insulation off of it. ^_^
TDD
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On 12/28/2013 10:06 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Now, I'm not disappointed. i figured TDD would mention the one thing, most important, which everyone else missed. Good job, mate.
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On 12/29/2013 6:24 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I missed writing "solder" after the word "silver". Silver solder has a higher conductivity than regular solder but you need to use some heat shrink for a strain relief for when the wire is bent at a sharp angle at the connector. ^_^
TDD
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On 12/29/2013 4:42 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

You can use low temp silver, if you don't nick the wire while stripping it.
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On Sat, 28 Dec 2013 21:06:35 -0600, The Daring Dufas

The crimp forms an air (moisture) tight seal. Solder doesn't add anything and will cause wires to break.
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On 12/29/2013 10:09 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I was taught that soldering is far better than crimp. What's your

I always solder them if expect them to be around moisture and always use heat-shrink tubing for a strain relief then I use dielectric silicone grease in the connector to prevent corrosion. I've never had a problem with wires breaking in those circumstances. I have had soldered wires break off circuit boards when they're bent at a sharp angle a few times. ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 29 Dec 2013 11:09:25 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Really, that must be why when they bury wires they just crimp them and call it good......
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wrote:

If the connector is designed to be crimped and buried, solder isn't going to help. It often will cause problems, though. Use connectors the way they were designed to be used and you will have fewer problems. ...but I'm sure you think you know better than the manufacturer.
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On Mon, 30 Dec 2013 20:51:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

You said crimps form a moisture tight seal. They don't. That's why no one but an idiot would crimp a wire and rely on your claim that it's suddenly become moisture tight.
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On 12/31/2013 12:27 AM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

A proper crimp does produce what's called a gas tight seal and works very well under normal circumstances especially if the insulation grip is properly crimped too. The non-insulated connectors are the ones that I will crimp and solder if it's needed but I always use a piece of heat shrink tubing to act as a strain relief to prevent the wire being pulled at a sharp angle which could break it off. ^_^
TDD
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On Tue, 31 Dec 2013 02:29:22 -0600, The Daring Dufas

The only time I solder a crimp connector is if I don't have the proper crimping tool or if I'm using the improper wire size for the connector or crimper. If I have the proper tools and connectors, never.
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On 12/31/2013 1:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I was taught that soldering is far better than crimp. What's your

I rarely solder a crimped connector but will use heat shrink tubing on any of them which will be put under a lot of stress unless it's a high temperature nickel connector used on a heating element then I will use fiberglass tubing. A big mistake made by a lot of folks is to use a regular connector for a high temp connection. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

As usual, you're wrong.
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While personal preference plays a large part in this choice, it is perhaps worth noting that autombile and truck manufacturers, aircraft manufacturers, and even aerospace industry, including the space shuttle builders among others, all crimp rather than solder their wire connectors and terminals.
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Larry W. - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On Sun, 29 Dec 2013 05:06:53 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lonestar.org (Larry W) wrote:

Your inclusion of truck manufacturers is definitely wrong. I guarantee that Caterpillar crimps and solders all of the connectors and terminals except where solder will prevent the terminal from seating properly in its' housing. Caterpillar builds trucks.
I suspect your list may have included other manufacturers in error.
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If we're going to quibble about the practices of a single manufacturer, then perhaps it's also worth noting that Cat has only been producing on-highway trucks since 2011. And while I have not professionally worked on their construction equipkment in over 30 years, and only rarely see a Caterpillar engine in my current job (Mostly Mack, Navistar, Cummins, DDA/Sterling & Freightliner BTW) I can guarantee you that the Cat connectors I have personally seen and worked on have all been crimped, not soldered.
--
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Larry W. - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On Sun, 29 Dec 2013 21:16:00 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lonestar.org (Larry W) wrote:

Well, if we're going to quibble, one would think it prudent to notice the phrase "except where solder will prevent the terminal from seating properly in its' housing" I had in my reply.
So, your point is?
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On Sun, 29 Dec 2013 15:51:02 -0600, Gordon Shumway

That must be virtually EVERY connection. They DO solder where wires connect to printed circuit boards in housings - where the wire is restrained by a strain relief. Even in-harness connections are crimped and not soldered.
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