Fitting a TV mount to less-than-ideal wall

I'm refurbishing our living room at the moment, and as part of this the TV is migrating from a stand to a wall bracket. Possible issue is that the wall concerned is a 100-year-old, plastered, single-skin red-brick internal wall, so I'm slightly concerned whether it's going to be up to the job if just attach the bracket direct to the wall with coach bolts or whatever.
The bracket I'm using is this one: http://tinyurl.com/nmo7qoc (or (Amazon.com product link shortened) _encoding=UTF8&colid=2NW7RW4L2AW7X&coliid=I2Z85JF00PN585) - I've fitted one before and it's excellent. I realise the cantilever arm isn't going to help matters, but we need that functionality. The TV is a 42" model weighing 23kg.
Is it going to be OK? Am I worrying too much? How would TMH respond if asked to fit this and stake his no-claims bonus on it!?
FYI as part of this refurb I'll be channelling in all the TV cables etc into the wall, after which I'm having it professionally skimmed, which has me thinking that this potentially offers the opportunity to hack off an area of the old plaster and attach an intermediate, largeish plate of some sort to the wall which the bracker could be attached to, in order to spread the load, should this be necessary?
--
David

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/08/2014 09:57, Lobster wrote:

Don't use expansive fixings like plugs or shield anchors.

Problem with that kind of bracket is the small area & low number of fixing points.

I'd use masonry bolts, then test the strength of the fixing. If all else fails I'd use resin anchors.

If you are refurbing that would give you the ultimate peace of mind.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/08/14 10:29, The Medway Handyman wrote:

MM. I was asked to do exactly this. During wall drilling a complete half brick popped out and there was a 4" square hole to the outside of the house.
I finished drilling that popped out brick and banged it back in with some strong mortar.
24 hours later a skim with some plaster and a lick of magnolia restored the inner surface, and the TV bracket went up with three big screws in plastic plugs and was still up when I finished the relationship with its owner some years later.
besides this was a CRT telly. Modern LCD are nothing like so heavy.
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. – Erwin Knoll
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lobster wrote:

    Me, I'm a coward. The wall may or may not have cement mortar. Unless the wall is two story, I'd settle for a stand. The thrust forces on the wall are going to be considerable. I don't think I'd risk it, even with a spreader plate if it's single story.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/08/2014 09:57, Lobster wrote:

A long time ago I worked for a company which installed CRT TVs on cantilever brackets on a regular basis, personally I wouldn't. Even with the relatively low mass of a modern LCD. If you absolutely have to have the functionality then bolt the bracket to a larger metal plate and bolt that to the brick and plaster over it. As others have said the bracket concentrates too much force in a small area and you want to spread that.
Another point is that if you actually use the cantilever function of the bracket, you will find out fairly quickly how well it's been made :) :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It would allow you to put the fixings to the bricks in the ideal place. If you have my luck, the holes on the bracket will always be over mortar.
I had a similar problem in my kitchen. Wanted the TV on an arm so it could be easily swivelled to point at the kitchen or breakfast room ends. Only suitable place was mounted above the peninsula unit and to the side of the chimney breast - and very close to the external corner. So I removed some tiles, and fitted steel straps to the brick extending back to the internal corner. With the bracket bolted to those. And then replaced the tiles. Works perfectly.
--
*Do they ever shut up on your planet?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A single brick outside wall?
--
*There are two kinds of pedestrians... the quick and the dead.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
/A single brick outside wall? /q
Maybe it was Ms Whiplash's dungeon room....
Jim K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/08/14 13:55, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Yup.
A single brick outside wall.
Its rather common round Cambridge.
19th century and pre WWI stock is 'bijoux desirable Victorian terrace/semi detached' and total utter rubbish.
Most were built as two up two down with an outside privy. And some had coal cellars. # Fronts and back are often faced with brick, general rubble as the doubling of the wall. The sides - and they used passage access when rear garden access want available - is single brick.
The standard 'conversion. is a lean to bathroom and bog at the back on the ground floor. Sometimes a second storey extension adds a third bedroom These are nearly always single brick too.
this heap of builder shit goes for upwards of 300 grand anywhere near the station.
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. – Erwin Knoll
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, 24 August 2014 09:57:27 UTC+1, Lobster wrote:

I'd use resin anchors. Buy some stainless steel threaded studding rod of the appropriate diameter and cut it to the right lengths. Drill hole, clean, squirt in resin, insert bolt.
Only problem is if you decide to move the bracket...
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/08/14 09:57, Lobster wrote:

I'd say if you have good bricks you are OK with something like rawlbolts.
If the bricks are soft then another option is resin anchors - I used these to hang a cistern and a basin on a celcon block wall.
A 3rd option is to mount a 2x2 ft bit of 18mm ply using a naumber of fixing points and then bolt onto that - this is a good option for plasterboard walls where it spreads the load.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24/08/2014 20:49, Tim Watts wrote:

From the description I would not take the chance.

Agreed; also Multi Monti's are very good, although it is important to use the right sized pilot drill, and they like an accurate hole. Depending on the bracket design you might be able to add extra bolts, or alternatives if one fixing goes "bad" e.g. because of breaking into the mortar.

Have often done that too, especially for radiators. You can chop out the plaster and inset the plywood; you may also get away with 12 mm.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, August 24, 2014 8:49:49 PM UTC+1, Tim Watts wrote:

TV

e
rnal

if

.
Update...
I'm on the point of actioning this, and would really like a reality check p lease!
I ended up working out exactly where I wanted the TV bracket to go, and the n hacked off all the old plaster around there, exposing the brickwork benea th. This enabled me to fine-tune the position of the bracket to maximise t he number of holes in decent meaty brick; also, I was able to repair the cr appy mortar between all the bricks to make the wall considerably stronger, and finally replaced the plaster with a 2'x2' square of sand-cement render over the area. Since then my plasterer has been and skimmed the whole room - looks fab! - and I've calculated the exact postions of my mounting holes for the bracket and am ready to drill.
The plan is to use 7 x M6 studs (the largest that the bracket will accept), held in place with resin. I've bought this stuff from Toolstation: OK?: http://tinyurl.com/p5bmnlf
I'll blow out all dust from the holes, which will be as deep as possible in this single-skin brick wall.
What diameter holes should I drill in the brickwork? Any more advice?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/11/14 21:14, Lobster wrote:

Hi,
I cannot remember exactly - it was one of the Fischer Vinyesters. I have also user Screwfix Nononsense resin, like:
http://www.screwfix.com/p/no-nonsense-polyester-resin-175ml/53359
and that seemed OK too.
Beware - one or two of the Fischer cartridges are too fat (wide) for a standard sealant gun. Never had trouble with the Scewfix unbranded.
What is important is:
Drill a reasonable hole (8mm in your case should do, but you need to be able to get the injector right in to inject resin from the bottom of the hole out - if necessary, drill your bracket and use M8 with 10mm holes).
The other is to clear the hole of dust.
http://www.screwfix.com/p/fischer-resin-pump/21142
but a bit of earth sleeve or similar pipe taped onto a bike pump would do. Again you have to blow sharply from the base of the hole. Less dust, the better the resin will bond.
M8
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for all the replies!
Does sound to me like the above solution is likely to be the safest option.
What would be my chances of skimming over this and persuading the plaster to stick to the wood (my previous experience suggests 'unlikely') Are there any tricks? Different type of plaster over the wood, maybe?
Given that this is all behind the TV, I'm perhaps being a bit precious even considering the aesthetics as an issue (ie, versus just insetting the plywood more or less flush with the adjacent plaster); however the cantlevered bracket does mean that the wall behind will indeed be visible most of the time. And all the cables are going to be run neatly below the wal surface, too.
--
David

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/08/14 12:39, Lobster wrote:

skrim tape over the join with the wall and a thin coat of filler.
PVA the wood.
Normal finishing plaster.
That should work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/08/2014 12:39, Lobster wrote:

Of course it depends on the depth of plaster and thickness of board, but the obvious answer is to glue plaster board to it and plaster over as normal. One traditional method was to drive pan-headed nails in almost flush and then plaster, don't like that idea though, I guess mesh would be better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lee wrote:

    Chicken wire will likely work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lobster wrote:

If there's going to be a TV covering the wood+bracket, do you /need/ to achieve a decorative finish over it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 25 August 2014 13:19:03 UTC+1, Andy Burns wrote:

as he needs the cantilever I expect it will all be visible from some angles...
Jim K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.