Fitting a TV mount to less-than-ideal wall

On 25/08/2014 12:39, Lobster wrote:

My plastering is crap, so I wouldn't bother. Put neat radii on the corners, sand down well, paint to match the wall. You could make the panel the same size as the backplate in which case it will barely show.
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/newshound On 25/08/2014 12:39, Lobster wrote: - show quoted text - My plastering is crap, so I wouldn't bother. Put neat radii on the corners, sand down well, paint to match the wall. You could make the panel the same size as the backplate in which case it will barely show. /q
How would that spread the load?
Jim K
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On 25/08/2014 20:25, JimK wrote:

Agreed, it doesn't. But I have had cases (fitting radiators on stud walls) where the fixing screws had to be in between studs, but you could mount the plywood perfectly solidly and then put the radiator brackets on the plywood. I could imagine a case for a TV bracket where two of the four holes were insecure in dodgy mortar or edges of bricks, but you could still achieve a secure fitting for a same sized plywood panel.
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Lobster wrote:

A few years back we had the job of fixing wall brackets and large TV sets in all the waiting rooms in a large hospital. The walls were many and various, but some were pretty dodgy. Single leaf breeze, and studding walls that were hollow with plasterboard faces. And some that were the same but a system build thing, steel sheet instead of plasterboard, covered with some sort of fabric.
We were obliged to demonstrate that each bracket when fully extended would support the weight of an adult, the reason being that patients can do strange things (think A & E on a Saturday night).
We used large commercial brackets, and the fixing method varied. In extremis we fitted a stout plank (10" x 2" I think) on the other side of the wall, from floor to ceiling. We put long, sleeved, M8 bolts through the wall to take the bracket. A plank, faced with plastic and with plastic corners, just looks like a pipe duct.
We have had similar jobs in prisons. In that case you have the additional problem that people might hang themselves from the bracket.
Bill
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Yes, you wouldn't want the bracket to fail is some thieving pikey scumbag was doing us all a favour.
--
Graeme

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newshound wrote:

When mounting a TV wall bracket on a large plywood backplate (to spread the load) put the fixing bolts for the wall bracket through the plywood from the back, so the threaded end is ready to receive the bracket when the plywood is mounted. Use large washers so the load of the bolts is spread. Tighten with pliers on the thread and then cut the excess thread off.
An aerosol of matt black can help. Spray your finger end, then dab paint on the nuts and bolt ends. Wipe your finger on the customer's white carpet. (Joke)
Bill
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