Solder or crimp ??

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On Sat, 28 Dec 2013 19:08:06 -0500, Stormin Mormon

The way I read the article he's talking about ONLY crimp versus ONLY solder. Not crimp first then solder, which is what I do if I'm looking for a belt and suspenders solution. That said, I've read in the past that a PROPERLY crimped connection does not need to be soldered, the kind of crimp powerful crimping machines can make in a manufacturing facility. The crimps I do at home, even with a decent hand crimper tool, I don't consider the same quality as a factory crimp. But many of those home crimps have lasted years and years with no trouble...
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wrote:

Correct, that's exactly what the article is about.

A properly crimped connection doesn't need to be soldered if that joint will never be stressed, if that joint will never be subjected to moisture or vibration, if that joint will not be subjected to a corrosive environment, if that joint is in a terminal that solder will prevent the terminal from seating properly in its' housing, if that joint...
There are a few more if's but I think you get the point. The biggest "if" is being properly crimped. Unless it is done under controlled conditions that will frequently not happen.
In the harnesses I designed for earth moving equipment for about 30 years all connections were crimped and soldered except the joints that solder would prevent the terminal from seating properly in its' housing. And that is exactly what I still do at home.
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On 12/28/2013 8:27 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

I use crimp on lugs (up to about 14 gage stranded) so it's a decision I get to make. Most of the time, I am not near a soldering iron. It's good to hear that properly done crimps are as good or better. Thanks to all who took the time to reply.
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Per Ashton Crusher:

On my winter bike - equipped with an electric motor - I've got 4 crimped Anderson connectors and four solder joints.
Over five years, the solder joints have failed twice but the crimped connectors have given no problems.
OTOH, that's just failure. The efficiency of transmission has got to be a whole other issue - which I have no clue about.
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Again done correctly, the crimp will have almost no differance than a single piece of wire. The solder will have a very small ammount of resistance.
Probably did not come out the way I want it to, but the crimp will have less resistance than a soldered joint.
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That's why a proper soldered joint is first crimped. Solder holds and seals the connection. That's the way I was taught.
I can make some pretty poor soldering at times, but I can also use proper technique. I passed a NASA soldering school class.
Who says a solder connection does not need proper strain relief to prevent vibration failure.
I have soldered large battery cables using hundreds of watts, as well as 1.5 mm caps to boards.
Greg
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wrote:

Our "radio guy" for all the state 2-way radios installs them with crimped connections as far as hooking them into the car electrical system, no soldering.
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On 12/30/2013 2:25 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

I only solder them when they really need it. Otherwise, I use my ratcheting crimp tool and crimp the insulated connection and cable grip. The more expensive connectors have a metal sleeve under the cable grip insulation. ^_^
TDD
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If you looked at crimp vs solder over the whole spectrum, you'd find the soldered connection to become 'noisy' with time. ...having variable resistance. Not too noticeable if you're powering a motor, because who cares if the connection comes and goes once in a while?
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wrote:

Solder will actually cause more problems than it solves (for properly crimped connectors). Solder will wick up into multi-strand wire and cause the wire to break at that point, under flex (work hardening).

They don't need to be machines. Hand crimpers work fine for smaller connectors. The ratcheting type are best.

Sure but adding solder doesn't solve anything if the crimp is good.
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That's what I learned in NASA soldering school, keeping wire from wicking.
Greg

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On Sun, 29 Dec 2013 11:08:04 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Putting aside vibration issues, I've always viewed the solder as insurance against corrosion. I have found crimps that were bad due to corrosion when used in exposed to weather areas. Never found a problem when they were soldered in such use.
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wrote:

It won't help if the crimp was right to begin with.

The wire breaks, instead.
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On Mon, 30 Dec 2013 20:49:56 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

No matter how perfect the crimp is it won't keep moisture out of the joint area. The edges of the metals are exposed, the corrosion starts there and works it's way back eating away at the metals. Just look at all the corroded battery cables that are crimped into the battery clamps, eventually the stuff corrodes away.

I've had far far more failed crimps from corrosion in exposed to weather areas then wires breaks from any cause. In fact, the only wire breaks I've had were on crimped and NOT soldered connections. I've never had a crimped AND soldered connection fail. YMMV.
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My guess, a crimp would work best on a single wire. Little strands do not get pinched together enough inside the bundle, and corrosion keeps wicking through. I never saw a wire wrap fail, but I never saw them used in poor environment. I've crimped really small contacts where soldering would take too long, and be impossible to prevent wicking. The crimpers also sometimes cost several hundred dollars. I'll admit, sometimes crimps are better. There is the other case, often on home appliances. The wires and crimps, and slide on connectors, get warm, then hotter, then literally burn off. The crimp will fail as well as turning the slide on contacts, brittle falling apart.
Greg
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On 12/31/2013 12:48 AM, gregz wrote:

In a home appliance that has a heating element, you don't use standard lugs or Faston connectors, you must use the high temperature connectors on the high temperature wire meant for heating element connections. Even those can burn off if the connection is not clean and the Faston connectors and lugs are not tight. The high temp connectors are made of nickle instead of tin plated copper. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

Caused by the slide on connector heating, not the crimp.
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On 12/31/2013 12:24 AM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

Sounds more like operator error. 33+ is a viable option, or sealing heatshrink. Your point is no different than complaining about terminal blocks that corroded.
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wrote:

You're wrong, of course.
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Not good idea to solder a crimped connector. The heat usually relaxes the pressure of the crimp nnd the advantage of the crimp is lost.
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