Replacing a non-threaded tub spout

In my guest bathroom, I have a bathtub with a shower - you pull up on the tub spout diverter, and water comes out of the shower instead of the spout (a very typical arrangement, nothing special). Guests recently have been commenting that less and less water comes out of the shower, and now most of the water comes through the spout.
In preparing to replace the spout, I was surprised just now when I removed the spout that it wasn't the kind that is threaded on. Rather, there is a small hex nut that is underneath, and, once that nut is loosened, the spout slips off to reveal 1/2" copper pipe protruding about 3" out - non-threaded.
Would it make sense to just replace the spout with something of like kind, or is it easy and would it make more sense to convert the pipe to have a threaded end so the spout could screw on and off? It's a pain reaching underneath and securing the hex nut. Thanks!
--Dilip
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Dilip Barman wrote:

No need to change it. Just replace it with another of the same kind. You may even be able to clean the one you have.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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I had that problem. About 8% of the shower water came out of the spout.

I replaced it, and 6% came out of the new one, so I replaced it with a nice brass industrial-looking quarter-turn valve :-)
Nick
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Dilip Barman wrote:

Well, let's see....To change the copper to a threaded fitting, you would need to determine the exact length needed for a threaded spout, cut the copper off at the correct length, buy a male adapter the correct size, solder the new adapter in place, then screw on the new tub spout and be very careful not to twist the copper.
Or you could buy a similar spout, slip it on and tighten the hex nut.
You decide.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Robert Allison wrote:

All this while working through a hole just slightly larger than the pipe; :-)

--
Joseph E. Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Read the last line in the second paragraph of the OP again Joeseph. He said it was protruding OUT about three inches, didn't he?
One of us missed something...
Cheers,
Jeff
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My name is Jeff Wisnia and I approved this message....

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Oh you want me to start reading???
Consider me dope slapped.

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Joseph E. Meehan

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Thanks for the comments. Here's a new one. I went to Home Depot and found only one replacement that seemed like it would work - a universal one that had plastic interior parts. There was one with a hex screw on the bottom, but it didn't have a diverter to pull up so water would go to the shower.
I'd rather put a brass or copper interior unit back in as the original seems (but can't really tell for sure). Does it really matter or can I go with the plastic interior? Thanks!
Dilip

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Dilip Barman wrote:

I have used some with plastic. They don't seem to last real long, but they are cheap, easy to find and easy to replace. Next time one goes out, I may look for a good one.

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Joseph E. Meehan

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On 27 Sep 2004 10:59:36 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@jhu.edu (Dilip Barman) wrote:

My Home Despot has two universal fit replacement tub spouts, identical except one has a diverter and one doesn't. Check again, or better yet go to a plumbing supply as I just did to replace a screw on spout and get a better quality, less expensive, spout than at the Despot.
--
Luke

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Are there several types of non-threaded connections for a tub spout? I have one with the "pull-up" diverter and it needs replacing. There seems to be a tiny hole on the underside of the spout, maybe the size of a #2 screwdriver shaft. Should i be probing int here for a set screw or a latch or something>
I don't want to just start poking or twisting thing and maybe break something expensive.
What sort of oddball hook-ups might I expect?
Jim P.
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Jim wrote:

I'm pretty sure the little hole is a "weep" hole for any internal leakage.
Do a GOOGLE search for: Diverter + tub + spout to see the different types.
Jim
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Jim wrote:

I believe you are likely to find a hex head screw in there. Try looking at it with a small mirror.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

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