OT: Camera batteries

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Non-rechargable lithium batteries work best in digital cameras. Last a long time too.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I use NiMH AA's and they work fine except if they sit a long time.
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On Mar 12, 11:51 am, "Stormin Mormon"

If you have a charger that charges 4 batteries, make sure all 4 batteries are charging. I found out that only 2 were charging, and the pilot light was shutting down, and 2 cells were still need of a charge. Check the voltage after charging, of all 4 cells. The batteries have to be in the charger slots just right. Also, take a pencil eraser and go over the camera and batteries once in a while to keep them clean. I have 2 chargers that do the same thing. Just my 2 cents!
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In article
snipped-for-privacy@zoominternet.net wrote:

You might explain to the uninformed reader as to WHICH PART of the camera and battery (cells) you apply the pencil eraser.
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JR

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Is that like being licked clean by a cat?
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For the batteries to discharge overnight, the camera must be constantly drawing from them or the batteries have reached the end of their useable life.
For replacements, try the Rayovac hybrid batteries ...they can hold a charge much longer than regular NiMH batteries.
J.
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My camera will run down the batteries when I am not using it. So I undo the battery cover when not in use and this disconnects the batteries. Then my batteries last a long time. The pictures remain in memory without the batteries on my camera.
"Stormin Mormon" wrote in message

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Bill wrote:

Excellent idea.
You've got to wonder what type of circuitry is draining the batteries when the camera's off.
I guess the on-off switch is, itself, electronic.
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It needs some power to remember the date & time...
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On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 11:51:56 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

    More often it is not a matter of quality, but rather type.
    Check your camera's owner's manual and see what they say about batteries, or find a camera group and include the type of camera you have and your typical use, like how many images per session and how many of those are flash?
    Also very important is how you recharge them. Some chargers do not do a good job and may damage the batteries or not provide a full charge. Make sure the charger is suitable for your batteries and it is a high quality charger.
Remember: * different battery types * different camera demands * different charger types * different charger usage.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

You should replace all batteries at once. If the others still have plenty of life left in them, put them back in the drawer for use in other things.
The reason is that, if one battery is fresh, and the others not, and they aren't charging up to the same full voltage (which is very likely, especially if they have been used a lot), then the fresh battery will instantly try to charge the other batteries to its voltage. But what happens is, the fresh battery very quickly becomes an "old" battery and the rate of its discharge into the other batteries will be so high for a very short period of time, it will "age" the new battery very quickly. So what you end up with is 4 "aged" batteries, not 3 old and 1 fresh one. The paperwork that came with your camera should have a statement similar to the above about replacing all 4 at once. They don't say why, but I haven't seen or heard of one that didn't say to change them all at once. My informaion on the battery action in the second para is basically a restatement of something I read about batteries that made sense, but which I cannot now back up with a URL; sorry. Should you disagree with this, as some usually do, then all I can say is to research it yourself. You'll find information very similar to what I stated and my confidence in it being likely correct is because I've seen it and similar information at several places. It doesn't seem to matter what type of battery it is.
HTH,
Twayne

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