most economical (gasoline)

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I don't think the things we did in the 70's would work now. From what I remember, the fuel cleaner smelled nothing like today's stuff.
Greg
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wrote:

Well, with over 40 years experience with the stuff, MMO is very effective at feeing up moderately stuck rings, quieting down noisy and sticky hydraulic lifters or timing chain tensioners and conditioning leather accelerator pump cups - among other maladies experienced by MANY engines.
In today's engines, it does appear to also solve sticking and dripping fuel injectors a good percentage of the time. Not foolproof - but always worth trying when the option is dissassembly of half the intake system to remove injectors for proper cleaning. $9 to have a better than 50/50 chance of avoiding $400 worth of repair is well worth it in my experience and opinion.
It was the first thing to try on the old 230 cu inch Chevy six when lifters got noisy (a common occurence) and quite often the last step required. Rislone worked too, sometimes - but usually took a bit longer - and was more likely to cause goey crud to turn to cinders in a poorly maintained engine. (more solvent - less lubricant)
Engine (4 cyl aircraft) sitting for a year or more has a "limp" when started - one cyl down on compression. Cyl leakdown shows 40/80 on 1, 70/80 on 2 and 75/80 on one.After 20 minutes of running - no change. Put MMO in the crankcase and run for 20 minutes and 75/80 all across the board. And that is not a one-time experience - just an example.

The stuff has a pretty good record for removing "greenies" from carburetors left overwinter with ethanol gasoline, as well as disolving varnish from carbs when used as a fuel additive - and when added to the crankcase has a similar effect on sticking valve lifters and timing chain tensioners
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On Sat, 25 May 2013 16:39:14 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

The reason "premium" was mentioned is that in MANY cases, the only ethanol free fuel you can buy IS premium. In Canada no Shell premium fuel has ethanol added. They sell a small enough percentage of premium that they can meet the ethanol content regulations completely by adding 10% or less to the low octane fuel, which when mixed with premium for the mid-grade yields a 5% ethanol blend.
As for lawn equipment, air cooled engines have a tendancy to run HOT - which makes even low compression engines succeptible to detonation - so running premium in lawn equipment has long been recommended.
When grass dust half plugs the cooling fins, lawn mowers run even hotter than normal.
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On Sat, 25 May 2013 23:21:54 -0400, clare wrote:

I agree that anything that makes an engine run with higher compression, higher heat, or advanced timing (further than spec), will increase the need for a fuel that resists detonation better.
Of course, the real solution is to clean the piston heads of carbon deposits; ensure the cooling fins aren't blocked; and make sure the timing is to spec - but - if these things are off - I do agree that an engine can knock.
And knocking, if it gets bad, can ruin engine journals, among other things.
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On May 25, 11:21 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I don't know who is making the recommendation to use premium. Not any of the eqpt manufacturers that I've seen. They all say to use regular gasoline.
.
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Today I stopped to gas up. Their pumps had two options, diesel or 87 octane gas. Shell. Strange.
Greg
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wrote:

Around here quite a few dealers have been recommending premium - and when I worked for an Ariens dealer back in the late sixties we recommended premium on the mowers - which also required popping the heads off to remove lead deposits every year or so. Prevented taking pistons out when (not if) the fins got plugged on a hot day.
Unleaded fuel solved the deposit problem, by and large. Some of the newer engines are less prone to plugging the fins and shrouds due to better housing design - but then just when they more or less solve that problem, they up the Compression Ratio with the OHV engines, and the fixed jet smog carbs run the engine on the lean side - particularly with ethanol fuel - so the octane requirements go up again - making premium fuel , particularly if it is ethanol free like Canadian Shell Ultra - a sensible option.
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On May 26, 9:41 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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ane

Lead deposits? The 60s? Good grief! Lead hasn't been in hardly any gasoline for what 40 years?

As I've said, I'd like to see one example of a MANUFACTURER of lawn eqpt that recommends using premium fuel.
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On 05/27/2013 08:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Surprisingly, it appears that it was still legal to sell in the US until 1995, although I don't remember seeing it being widely available after the early 80's. Likely, since road vehicles manufactured after the early 70's couldn't run it, there wasn't much market for it so it was slowly phased out as demand dropped.
nate
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On 5/27/2013 8:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I was still buying leaded 89 octane, at the pump, in the early to mid 80's. It was replaced by 89 octane no-lead. You can still find Sunoco Race Fuels (Cam2), which are leaded.
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wrote:

Alcohol free gas is usually marketed as REC 90 and it can cost up to a buck a gallon more than E-10 87
I will keep running the cheap stuff thank you.
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On Mon, 27 May 2013 11:06:19 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

Where can I find some of that cheap stuff in California? :)
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