How best to dilute gasoline to use in a kitchen sink?

Any suggestions of common household chemicals that can dilute gasoline?
I use gasoline as a home goo-gone substitute for removing labels. Most often I do it outside, because of the stink, but I want to keep it inside in tiny amounts, diluted as much as possible.
I've already tried all the common home chemicals from alcohol to acetone to lemon juice to engine degreaser to dish detergent to brake cleaner to windex to automatic-transmission fluid and MAF cleaner, all of which work sometimes but all of which fail often (either because they melt the container or they don't dissolve the goo).
I've even tried common flavorings such as orange blossom extract, rose water, pure lemon extract, coconut oil and walnut oil, which, surprisingly, are totally useless (but they do smell the best!).
I've found, through decades of experience, that gasoline, which also fails sometimes, works more often than any other household common chemical.
But gasoline has all the problems that most of you will love to "teach" me, but that's not the question (so please don't try to teach me why gasoline vapors are flammable and why I should goo-be-gone outdoors because I know that).
Also please don't try to teach me that there are commercial lemon-oil solutions.
I just want to dilute the gasoline and I already know that even the diluted gasoline vapors will be flammable. We take risks sometimes when working around the house and not being a pussy about it all the time.
So I plan to keep a small jar of gasoline properly labeled under the kitchen sink (let's not go into the dangers of doing that, because properly diluting it won't solve that danger for the most part).
Without being a pussy about the question, do you have any suggestion that you think might work best to dilute the gasoline 10:1 (or even 100:1) so that I'm using the minimum effective amount of gasoline indoors?
What can I 'cut' the gasoline with that will mix with the gas and dilute it (maybe 10:1 or even maybe 100:1)?
Any suggestions of common household chemicals that can dilute gasoline?
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Ethanol, 2 cycle engine oil, methanol.
That said, you are better off using wd-40, turpentine or mineral spirits instead of gasoline. WD-40 does a great job removing labels.
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 00:22:22 +0000, Stormin' Norman wrote:

Interesting suggestions! For different reasons.
1. Because I long ago found common household isopropyl alcohol useless as a goo-be-gone substitute, I had forgotten that they "cut" gasoline 15% in cars using corn alcohol, so, why hadn't I thought of cutting the gasoline with "alcohol"?
So thanks for that suggestion - but it seems to come with a problem.
The problem of course, is that ethanol isn't easy to come by cheaply, even though it, itself, is as cheap as corn. Even in the cheapest grain alcohol that I can find at a liquor store, it's almost certainly gonna be far more expensive than the gasoline that I'm cutting.
So, it might work, but it defeats the purpose of a cheap home remedy. (Unless there is a methanol source that is cheap?)
2. Two stroke engine oil. Again, this is a great suggestion (if it works). But it too seems to come with a problem.
The problem is that, while we all routinely cut our two-stroke tools' gasoline with 40:1 and 50:1 two-stroke oil, the cutting is in the opposite direction. We're actually cutting the oil with gasoline, and not cutting the gasoline with oil.
So, a reverse dilution of 10 parts oil and 1 part gasoline doesn't seem, on first inspection, to be a viable solution (because it may be too oily, which is antagonistic to the original goal).
3. I had tried wd40 in the past and found it not useful but maybe I need to try it again? Like everyone, I grew up with WD-40 and 3-in-one cans always on the garage shelf, but over the years, I have found far too many people suggesting wd40 for far too many things, where, in EVERY CASE I ever investigated, there was a far better miracle-in-a-can than WD-40.
WD-40 stinks worse than gasoline, by the way, to me anyway - where it gives me a headache, so, for that reason alone, it would be no good. But even if I could handle the stink of WD-40, from memory, it's just a "displacement fluid" which I don't see *any* use of which doesn't have a better solution for what it does (whether that be cracking nuts or "lubricating" garage springs or whatever).
In short, I haven't had WD-40 around in years because I stopped believing in miracles in a can. But if it works at a 10:1 ratio of 10 parts WD40 to 1 part gasoline, maybe that might be feasible?
4. On Turpentime and mineral spirits, I went to the hardware store recently to get MEK and they can't even sell that in California. I think I was looking at the other "solvents" like paint thinner, and they can't sell them either except at "substitutes". I'll have to look again, but I've already tried all the "solvents" that I had in my garage, which is as cluttered as anyone's so I had plenty of paint thinners there (but I didn't mention that in the OP).
Still, they may be the BEST bet yet, so I'm glad you brought them up. a. Except in California, they're pretty commonly available b. They're cheap enough to use at 10 parts solvent & 1 part gasoline c. They are solvents so they won't be antagonistic to the original goal
I'll head off to the hardware store to see what California chemicals I can find that are cheap and that are solvents that I can cut at a 10:1 ratio of solvent to gasoline.
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I will reiterate my recommendation, use WD-40 for label removal. If the odor is too offensive for your manly sensibilities, buy the product in liquid form. If you do not atomize it with a spray, the odor is far less pervasive.
With WD-40, apply a light layer to the label and just let it sit for a little while. Come back in 10 - 15 minutes and the adhesive will have dissolved and the label will slide off with virtually no work.
If you need a powerful solvent that will dissolve almost anything else, buy a can of lacquer thinner (yes, it is available in California) LT is unbelievable in it's utility.
Use of and storage of gasoline and other highly carcinogenic chemicals mixtures inside the living area of a residence is as inadvisable as smoking or leaving a loaded, unlocked firearm where might be accessible by a 5 year old child.
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Stormin' Norman wrote:

Dedicated label remover is better than WD-40 and the orange smell is quite nice.
<
https://youtu.be/b4Cu1tYpc64

https://youtu.be/b4Cu1tYpc64

No, he doesn't compare petrol to the others :-P
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 14:51:39 +0000, Andy Burns wrote:

Thanks for that video.
The video underscores the fact that no one solvent works in all cases, so all we really are looking for is a solvent that works most of the time.
The video also underscores the *confusion* that surrounds removing labels.
They tested against paper labels the following removers: 1. Maplin Label Remover 2. Zinsser Universal Degreaser & Cleaner 3. WD-40 4. Methylated spirits
The confusion is that the video highlights that there are two *separate* problems, one of which I've solved long ago, but both of which they are attacking.
1. Removing a (paper in this case) label 2. Removing the underlying goop
I only am attacking the underlying goop, since soaking removes paper labels quite well already.
IMHO, when I'm looking for a cheap readily available household chemical to remove the goop, I don't need to make the problem *harder* by also asking that chemical to remove the (paper in this case) label, especially since there is already a cheap readily available household solved (aka dihydrogen oxide) which removes paper labels quite handily.
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 14:38:22 +0000, Stormin' Norman

It will also REALLY piss off your insurance company - even if stored in a sealed "listed" container.
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 14:38:22 +0000, Stormin' Norman wrote:

I hear you on the miracle-in-a-can as I knew about it, and had tried it years ago, and decided it was a myth. But I can try it again, especially if, as you say, they supply a liquid version of this miracle in a can.

I appreciate that advice since I didn't know they made a liquid form. I have only used the spray, and found it to be substandard in every way for "lubrication" and "protection" of metal-on-metal surfaces.

Thank you for that point, which I agree with you on, which is that for my use, the miracle in a can will best be the liquid version.

Interesting that you mention a "label". I always remove the label first, generally by soaking in plain old water. Once I have the label removed, that's where I need the solvent to remove the goop.

I think I've tried it, but I see I don't have any on my shelves at the moment, so, if California will allow me to buy it, I'll pick up some lacquer thinner if it's still sold.

And wipe your shoes before you come in the house. Otherwise, someone might slip on the mud.
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You can get a gallon of it for about $17 through Amazon. That should last you for years.

That is because it is a penetrating oil and water displacement agent. It was originally developed for protecting the outer skin and the fuel tanks of the Atlas missile.

A gallon through Amazon should be less than $20. I really hate going to Home Depot. The gallons are a much better deal than quarts.

Good advice, wiping your shoes also helps keep unnecessary dirt out of the house. One of our critters is a very sweet, personable and affectionate donkey. Every opportunity she gets to come in the house, she sneaks in, she doesn't ever cause a problem, other than the dirt that comes in on her hooves.
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Use heat. Burn that shit off.
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 19:08:29 -0000 (UTC), Robert Bannon

Perhaps the "single step" method using "miracle in a can" would be the sinpler way????

Turn your boots over and shake them before you put them on to be sure there is no mouse or scorpian in your boot (or shoe)
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 18:32:59 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yup. That kind of advice. :)
It's the useless kind of advice that dumb mommy's love to give.
My sister keeps sending me these hoaxes to watch out for razor blades in my kids halloween candy and to watch out for people selling cookies, etc.
There's a certain kind of person (most of those in the California Assembly, in fact) who feel they need to be a nanny to everyone.
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On Sun, 20 Nov 2016 02:49:34 -0000 (UTC), Raymond Spruance III

I don't call it useless advice depending where you are. I have had a mouse in the bottom of my boot more than once on the farm, and scorpians in my shoes several times in Africa.

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On 11/18/2016 7:05 PM, Robert Bannon wrote:

Nope, won't even call you an idiot for using gasoline in the house. For liability reasons though, I won't tell you what can dilute it because none are truly safe.
I bet the guys down at the firehouse know what to use. You should go down and ask them.
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The only thing I know of that will "dilute" gasoline and make it less flammable is Carbon Tet - which has serious safety issues itself and has been illegal for years.
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On Fri, 18 Nov 2016 23:37:20 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

This is interesting, even though carbon tetrachloride is probably difficult to get and hence isn't a standard household chemical.
You have a good point in that the goal of dilution is to reduce the deleterious qualities of the gasoline, which, let's face it, works just fine as a label goop remover.
The problem with the gasoline is obvious though, so that's what I'm trying to reduce by diluting with some other common household chemical.
I was hoping that the dilution would reduce the negative complications of gasoline.
From the scientific standpoint (which is really what I'm after), are you saying that a 50:50 mixture of methanol and gasoline would be *more* flammable than a 100% mixture of either one?
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 19:08:27 -0000 (UTC), Robert Bannon

The big danger with methanol combustion is you can't see the light blue flame in a well lighted room - or even a poorly lighted one.. Other than that it is actually inherently safer than gasoline - and the mixture is more dangerous than straight methanol as far as fire is concerned.
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On Sat, 19 Nov 2016 18:29:18 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I don't see alcohol, in any form, as viable, simply because I probably can't easily get the alcohol without copious amounts of accompanying water.
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On Sun, 20 Nov 2016 02:49:32 -0000 (UTC), Robert Bannon

And IF you can fet it 200 proof (100%) it will not stay that way because it is TERRIBLT Hydroscopic. It will absorb moisture out of desert air!!!
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oil alcohol
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