I replace the heating element in my kenmore 90 series. It heats but not like it use too.

I replaced my heating element in my kenmore 90 series(it was bad.) I hooked everything back up, nothing was burnt on the connectors. But my heating element seems not to stay on long enough to dry a load of close like it use too.
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On Monday, June 2, 2014 11:05:37 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

ARe you sure it was the heating element that was bad to begin with? Possible that something else was and is the real problem? Checked that the vent is clean of lint and that air is coming out normally when it's on?
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On Monday, June 2, 2014 10:05:37 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I clean and check everything. The heating element was broken that is why I treplaced it.
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On Tuesday, June 3, 2014 9:32:10 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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On Tuesday, June 3, 2014 10:50:48 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

try disconnecting the vent line that goes outside, and check for lint build up at the dryer exit.
if it dries well you have a blocked vent somehow..
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hi, Staying on not long enough? Sign of over heating? Vent problem?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com posted for all of us...
And I know how to SNIP

Did you get the exact wattage replacement?
--
Tekkie

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On Monday, June 2, 2014 10:05:37 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Thanks anyway for trying to help. It most likely one of the sensors.
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I'm not doubting you, but I also don't know what you mean by "everything". Does "everything" include the internal ductwork and the blower?
I take the back of my dryer off and then remove the ductwork that covers the blower. I have often found the blades of the blower were covered with lint, impeding the airflow. Another member of this group posted that he had thought he cleaned his dryer but it didn't improve the performance. Then he took the back off and looked at the blower. He said he had to chip the lint off of the blower with a tool.
Just sayin'
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On Wednesday, June 4, 2014 9:47:55 AM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

One of the simplest and fastest tests is to just feel if a good volume of air is coming out the exhaust outside. If it is, then you don't even have to move the unit, disconnect anything etc. If the exhaust is at ground level, very easy to do. It's also a good idea to check in there at least once a year, from my experience that's one spot where lint tends to build up.
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On 6/2/2014 10:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Certain aren't two elements and only replaced the one and other is also/now out? IME, disturbing one while replacing the other is likely to cause it to break or fail very quickly having been embrittled by use. Consequently, I replace both whether one is apparently ok when dissassembling anyway.
The aforementioned airflow is a possibility but if symptoms are sudden and changed not terribly likely unless it was a coincident lodging of an obstruction, a buildup would be gradual over time...
--


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...snip...

Define a "good volume of air". Unless the user has a baseline from a clean system, it could be hard to tell if the airflow is "good" or not.
I've had low airflow. I removed the lint from the exterior and had much better airflow after that. I decided to go further and cleaned the vent pipe and blower. Only then did I have maximum airflow.
As soon as I suspect an airflow issue, I clean the entire unit. There is always some lint inside and I have the opportunity to inspect other items like the belt, the seal around the blower, etc. I feel that it's an hour well spent and so far my process has kept an inexpensive dryer running for many, many years.
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On Wednesday, June 4, 2014 2:23:49 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Well I think you have to have some degree of common sense. One good measure is if it opens the typical vent slats most of the way or barely at all. And if you check and clean that part, which should be done probably once a year, then you should have an idea of how much air is normally coming out.
That works for me. I haven't had to disassemble the dryer and it works fine.
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On Monday, June 2, 2014 11:05:37 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I had a WIERD dryer problem a couple years ago. Most of the time the dryer worked fine, but if multiple loads drying time skyrocketed.
So I pulled the machine out and disconnected the vent line. Reached in no lint build up, tried to reach futher i got soaked.
a few months before that i had replaced a washing machine hose that started leaking.
this created a low spot in the vent line, with long runs moisture would condense and block the airflow.....
if i have any dryer problems i disconnect the vent line and do a load as a experiment.
dries fine not vent line issue
poor drying with the line disconnected its a internal dryer issue
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I agree to some extent. However, a dryer that is "working fine" might work even better if it was given a thorough cleaning every now and then. I don't know how many years you've owned your dryer, or how much use it gets, but I'd be surprised to hear that you found no lint on the blower or on the internal ductwork if you took it apart after a few years of use. Even a minimal amount of blockage will impede airflow and therefore efficiency.
As far as checking the airflow by hand once a year, I doubt any of us would notice a slow decrease in the airflow on a YOY basis. Heck, I have trouble remembering much more important things on YOY basis than the amount of air that blows on my hand from a dryer vent. ;-)
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High limit thermostat. mounted close to heating coil may be tripping at too low of temperature. WW
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I replaced my heating element in my kenmore 90 series(it was bad.) I hooked everything back up, nothing was burnt on the connectors. But my heating element seems not to stay on long enough to dry a load of close like it use too.
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