Central Air v. Window-unit Air?

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No it's not. What thrills you about modern steels used at low temperatures? It's an everyday occurance. Don't be so afraid.
JTMcC.
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Exciting is breaking 10 feet thick, multi-year ice with a steel ship hull in the Arctic.
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You didnt answer the question. I do. I met the design builder in Honolulu two months later.
So tell me what happened in this case. It was in alaska approx 1981. Smart remarks dont count, just an outcome and what would cause that outcome. Many people I talk to in this business know instantly what will happen in a case like that.
Phil Scott

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With a change of 100 deg F, thermal expansion / contraction of mild steel is appx 3/4in per 100 ft. of length.
In your case above it is concievable that the inner welds could have failed given it was a fairly large ship, and provided the temperature change occured rapidly enough that heat heat wasnt transferred quickly enough so as to equally soak all of the structural members.
In real life, this would be pretty damned difficult to accomplish, at best--100 deg is a fairly large delta.
--
SVL




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As the refrigeration systems were started up, 3ea 600 ton ammonia screw machines, the holds reached minus 20F... the bankers and other other investors were gathered on deck drinking champagne and eathing sushi... a noise some described as a howitzer being fired occurred, and the ship shook violently as the high rollers fled for the gang plank and watched the ship break in half and sink in a matter of minutes, all that was sticking out of the water was an antenna mast
I met the guy who designed and built the refrigeration on the ship in Honollulu about 6 months later. (getting ready be the chief engineer on one of Haddon Salts lobster boats ..H Salt Esquire fish and chips magnate... I met him in Honolulu as well and refrigerated one of his boats, a 160' lobster boat...a single stage R502 blast freeze system fit into one of the boats holds.)
Phil Scott

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I'm having trouble picturing this.

Interesting... Would you describe what happened more exactly?
Odd they didn't try this before the bankers showed up... :-)
Nick
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The steel bulkheads and decking shrank but the outer hull of the ship didnt becauase it was of course immersed in 50 degree sea water not allowing it to cool along with the bulkhead and deck plate. the shrink would have been in the 1" range, heavy steel plate, enough to crack the hull all the way around and below the water line. The ship would have been of course heavier on one side of the crack, that weight and boyancy differential would have pulled it apart.
When I met the engineer. a greek guy I forgot his name he was in Honolulu atire, shorts, and boots..and no hair on his body...he told me the story.. he got so upset he shed all of his hair and had to take a range of calm down pills and see a shrink.
Phil Scott

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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Odd that no real info is given other than, 'I was in Honolulu', 'Alaska approx 1981', 'lobster boats' .
Hell, I was in Honolulu and saw an alien who looked like an alaskan lobster. A ship blew up and sank. Investors ran. I was kinda drunk at the time, so my memory might not be as precise as Phil's.
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California has estimated the average residential duct loss there to be in the 30% range. Based on what we see in NY that seems reasonable to me.
On Sat, 6 Aug 2005 00:39:38 -0700, "Phil Scott"

--
Never mind the facts - I know what I know






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wrote:

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wrote:

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Measure the temp of the air going into the return grilles and the return air temp at the furnace. There's often a big difference there too.
On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 16:13:16 GMT, "FDR"

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The problem too is that the house is cold on one end and warm on the other in the winter. The easiest thing seems to be adding a electric heater to help a bit.
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Assuming the furnace is properly sized sealing and balancing the system will do wonders.
On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 14:05:57 GMT, "FDR"

--
Never mind the facts - I know what I know






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Fire axe, and sawzall does wonders.
--

Christopher A. Young
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Well, unfortunately, the previous owners sheetrocked the lower level ceiling so there's no access to the duct flow controls for the upper level vents. ************************************************************************************ You can accomplish the same thing by covering part of the outflow vents in the hotest/coldest rooms. Use tape to partially cover the vents while you are experimenting and when you get the correct flow to the entire house, you can put a piece of tin behind the vents, the same size as the tape.
--
JerryD(upstateNY)




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Before I put an electric heater in, I would put an unvented natural/propane gas heater in the coldest spot. (unless you have small rooms and closed doors) I have one in the kitchen/living room area and we use it when it is too warm to start a fire in the woodstove. Just make sure you put a Carbon monoxide detector in the room.
--
Joe

The problem too is that the house is cold on one end and warm on the other
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Are you talking about those in-wall types?

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