Car Question

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On Fri, 6 Nov 2015 07:52:09 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

The label on a battery doesn't mean ANYTHING, as far as which way it faces, or which way it is installed. I know a battery distributor that sells batteries under their own brand, as well as supplying them for several other "private brands" and under the OEM name. They all come in with no labels on them. They install their own private label, the customer's private label, or the OEM label, depending where they are going to be sold. The labels just go on. Sometimes one way, sometimes the other - and in many cases no top label at all - just the side panel labels.
I would NEVER go by label position to install a battery. ALWAYS go by post location, and double check polarity before attempting to install.
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On Friday, November 6, 2015 at 12:28:49 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Which is exactly what I did. I was simply explaining the reason for my initial confusion.
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On Fri, 6 Nov 2015 09:47:59 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
Snipped for brevity::

ANd you would not have become confused if you did not give that useless label some credence in the first place - - -
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On Fri, 6 Nov 2015 07:52:09 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Don't worry about it. It was good of you to go to so much trouble to check out what you had said.
Did you see my other post about Firestone. Today went by quickly but I'll call them next week.
When I say the cables on my current car move an inch or two, it's an inch to the left or an inch to the right, total two inches.
I bought this great device, Priority Start, that monitors battery voltage. Maybe there is a drain from the car alarm, or a glove box left on, or the headlights, or something, and it disconnects the battery when there is still enough juice to restart the car. All you need do to reconnect the battery is turn on something that uses a bunch of power. The dome light probably isn't enough but stepping on the brake pedal usually is. And the car starts right up. The radio stations are probably gone, and they say the engine control computer loses its gathered data, but frankly, my cars have never seemed to run differently without it. It was 80 dollars or a little more, but well worth it.
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On Friday, November 6, 2015 at 8:31:44 PM UTC-5, Micky wrote:

Thanks.

I don't think you'd see any performance difference after the ECU loses it's mind, but I doubt you'd be able to get the vehicle inspected until all of the monitors reset. That can be either via a few days of normal driving or by performing a specific "drive cycle" which may reset them more quickly.
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On Sat, 7 Nov 2015 05:37:45 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

On some cars performance and/or economy will take a minor hit untill the fuel trims reset, and on even fewer, the timing limits reset.(adjust to the fuel octane you are running or ethanol percentage)
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wrote:

NOT a good idea to install a reversed battery, even if the cables fit, because very often the ground post is close to things that can easily short to ground, while the "live" post is where it is safe. Turn it arounf and the ground is well protected and the "live" is in close proximity to the body or some other grounded structure --- NOT a good situation.
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wrote:

I partially retract what I said. It also has "Adapter for JIS (Pencil Post) Adapt your pencil post battery so SAE clamps will work securely. More >>"
But unless you had the same problem with both posts, I don't think you have pencil post, whatever that is.

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On 11/5/2015 1:18 PM, Micky wrote:

It is imperative he does not try to connect a larger cable connector to a smaller battery post and vice versa. It is imperative he confirms the negative cable is on the negative post and positive cable on the positive post. If they are crossed, he WILL blow out his electrical system at the least. That's a costly mistake for something which can be avoided by paying attention.
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wrote:

I am most confident, that I havwe the correct (+) and (-) post orientation/ connection. The Pos terminal does firt my Highlander, it is only the Neg post where the "connection clamp" is over sized, cannot securely clmap.
Of note, the factory installed clamp is a crimp fit, precluding an option to easily connedt another, after maket clamp
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2015 17:58:37 -0500, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If you are CERTAIN you have the right battery, just buy a new negative cable and bolt it to the chassis somewhere and connect it to your new battery
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On Sat, 07 Nov 2015 19:17:52 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Both Costco (where purchased) and the lame Interstate customer Service have re-confirmed that I have purchsed the recommended unit.
I bought the Highlnader new, thus I know that I have the original negative battery connecting strap/ securing clamp.
I was wondering if I cut a side open, on a short copper tube - then put it over the negative post. With the increased diameter, the neg clamp would securly compress. I am not sure if I might introduce other problem(.)s, eg a galvanic reaction etc?
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On Sunday, November 8, 2015 at 11:26:16 AM UTC-5, Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Can you purchase the same *brand* as the battery you are trying to replace?
Did you put a set of calipers on the Neg post of both batteries? Wouldn't it be interesting to find that they are the same width (and height) which would take us back to the terminal.
When my wife drove a Taurus we had a few "dead battery" instances. I found that the positive terminal would always be slightly loose each time the battery died. It just wouldn't stay tight for some reason. I was chatting with a mechanic who does side jobs and he said he'd replace the terminal for $25, parts and labor. Mid winter, why would I say no? I went to his house, pulled into his garage and less than an hour later, the problem was solved.
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Rob snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com formulated on Monday :

A better idea would be to get a small piece of lead sheet (roof flashing etc) and wrap that around the post till it is large enough to clamp.
--
John G Sydney.

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On 11/8/2015 6:17 PM, John G wrote:

Why do some people insist the OP use an adapter or bushing? That can still lead to a spark and/or premature battery death. Simply purchase the proper cable from an auto parts store. Direct contact is the best connection. Problem solved.
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On Monday, November 9, 2015 at 5:58:06 AM UTC-5, SBH wrote:

Suggesting is not insisting.
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On Monday, November 9, 2015 at 6:24:36 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

How exactly a well tightened down terminal with a suitable filler material inside is going to create a spark, IDK. If it were me, I'd do that and sleep fine at night. He could replace the whole cable, but even if you do it yourself, it could be a real pain in the ass. People assume the other end is trivial to access. In many cars today, it isn't.
I still can't fathom how this is happening. The video one, it had some kind of metal cap interposer because *the connector was broken.* I guess maybe if over time the connector is over tightened, the lead will stretch until it's ruined. Maybe that's what happened here. The other solution would be to cut off the old cable connector and then put on a new one. How easy that would be to due, IDK. In a vice, it would be easy. With the cable end not being held, IDK.
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On 11/9/2015 8:26 AM, trader_4 wrote:

If using anything other than a battery shim, there's a potential for the connection to fail from vibration and cause a spark. If using an actual battery post shim, then it should be ok. Though, I would still replace the cable if possible. Shim would be second option.
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On Monday, November 9, 2015 at 5:02:22 PM UTC-5, SBH wrote:

Your car, your choice. I could sleep well at night with a piece of copper tubing fashioned into a shim. Once it's tightened down, it's not going anywhere. That is assuming the cable connector isn't already failing, which it might be.
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John G wrote:

Yes, shimming is one way to do it.
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