The toughest grass in the world?

Hi guys,
I'm Stu and I'm trying to find some advice. I wasn't sure where to look, but thought some of you guys might be able to help?
My problem surrounds grass, as per the title.
I'm part of a local club the run electric radio control cars on a grass track. On a normal club meet, the cars take quite a toll on the grass. It gets slightly discoloured where the track has been and ruts up in places where drivers apply the power. However it usually recovers well as we only use it once a fortnight.
The real trouble comes when we hold big regional meetings. 120 Drives soon destroys the place.
I was hoping to find some ideas on what we can do with the grass. Some parts of the track have been astro turfed, however keeping the grass is what attracts the drivers, so we don't want to cover the whole thing.
Does anyone have any experience with extreemly high wear areas or indeed any suggestions on either helping stop the ground rutting up in the first place, or helping the ground recover?
Thanks in advance Stu
--
Stu L


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Stu L wrote:

The toughest turf grass is probably Bahia, but it's a warm season grass so it might not be useful for you.
-Bob
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Stu L wrote:

There is no perfect solution to this. While some grasses are more durable than others heavy traffic will always chew up grass. I think you are stuck with the rutting. You can make the best of it by making conditions so that it grows well and recovers as soon as possible. This involves loosening campaction, appropriate feeding and watering, replacing very damaged areas with new sods, etc. If you can avoid holding meetings while the grass is dormant in winter or the ground is wet then do so. Try to get a greenkeeper interested in model cars.
David
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On Wed, 31 Aug 2011 16:48:15 +0000, Stu L

Grow hay. Hay is ten times tougher and grows ten times faster than common turf grasses and when mowed at a two inch length looks as good if not better than any lawn. The only negatives are that hay is coarse, not very comfortable to walk on barefoot... but would probably work well for racing toy cars... and you'd need to mow it every other day at a minimum, during hot wet weather mow every day.
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Brooklyn1 wrote:

What grass species are characteristic of those cut for hay that are not found in common turf grasses? What specifically is hay seed so that the OP can buy it?
D
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David Hare-Scott wrote:

Orchard grass, tall fescue, Coastal bermudagrass, bahiagrass, etc. Tall-growing coarse grasses, but you probably don't want Johnsongrass (and probably not red clover nor alfalfa.) Some white clover mixed in wouldn't be bad.
-Bob
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There is also "Kentucky 31" a tough broad leaf bright green tall fescue grass that is also used for cow pastures a very hardy grass. Must mow it often and one can also walk on it with bare feet... Also a very low cost grass about $30 US for a fifty pound bag. "timothy grass" is also another one great for hay fields, cow pastures and a tough lawn.
You will need a really good lawn mower with blades kept sharp. If you let it grow tall it will bog down a cheap low powered mower.
--
Nad

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Why the preference for white clover?
--
- Billy
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Billy wrote:

It hugs the ground. Red clover is upright; you wouldn't be able to mow it.
bob
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zxcvbob wrote:

But we are after tough species that will take foot and wheel traffic, clover doesn't fit that. If we were establishing a pasture it would be different.
David
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Grow hay. Hay is ten occasions harder and develops ten occasions faster than common turf grasses so when freshly mowed in a two inch length appears to be good otherwise much better than any lawn. The only real disadvantages are that hay is coarse, not so comfortable just to walk on barefoot... but would most likely work nicely for racing toy cars... and you'd have to mow it every second day at least, throughout hot wet weather mow every single day.
--
lighting123


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On Thu, 1 Sep 2011 12:38:55 +1000, "David Hare-Scott"

Can't be specific without knowing the OP's location but this is a good resource: http://hayandforage.com/ar/Hay-Prices-Resources / Best is to check at the local agri seed, feed and grain emporium, ie. Agway. They will likely recommend a blend.
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