uPVC or wood?

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I've ruled out metal frames as they're just not aesthetically pleasing.
So, the choice is either uPVC or wood. uPVC is maintenance free but looks a bit crap...
Which would you go for, and why?
I .think. I'll go for wood - can anyone tell me what maintenance will be required and how often?
Thanks in advance.
Sean.
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wrote:

Am I the only person on the planet that thinks that Aluminium frames look really rather good?
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On ships or planes ?
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No, I like them too. On anything built post WW1
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uPVC is rarely maintenance free. I've seen more skanky looking plastic windows than wooden.
I didn't see the original question, but I'm guessing the answer goes something like:
Use the windows that are appropriate for the age and design of the property. If it originally had metal Critall windows, then find modern replacements. If it is a Victorian property, get proper wooden sashes. If it is a 1980s Baratt hutch, get uPVC.

Painting every 5 to 7 years, occasional touching up between.
uPVC seems to require wholesale replacement every 10 to 15 years or so. A good quality hardwood wooden window, well maintained, will last for centuries. Even a cheap softwood frame will last many decades, with the right treatment and care, whilst higher quality softwoods can also last centuries.
Christian.
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Make that more like one, limping on to two with patching. My experience with two from Magnet - which were sold as pressure treated.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Dave Plowman (News)"

Mine are over >100 years old.
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Bought from Magnet? ;-)
I too have timber windows over 100 years old, but they were made from *real* wood.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Dave Plowman (News)"

Mine were made from cheap crap. But they were well painted when they went it.
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I've not seen cheap crap timber used in the UK 100 years ago?

My original sash windows had no paint at all on the sides of the frames - ie the wall side.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Oh boy was it. They started using (importing ?) some dire pine and other softwoods around then. Before that English hardwoods tended to dominate. Our place has had bits added over the centuries and it is the 1890s bit that needed the most wood replacement. There's an oak beam possibly from the 1600s further down the corridor with hardly a mark on it.
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I'm in Bristol. We were one of the main ports for that trade.
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wrote:

Yeah. I'm from there too. I suppose dodgy wood was somewhat more ethical than our previous biggest cargo.
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Delete the word 'bit' and I'll agree again

If you get a good hardwood frame, have it properly treated before installation then stained or painted if needed after insulation it will need little attention. Oak can possibly even be left 'as is' until well after you're dead.
It is poor quality softwood frames that gave wood a bad name and led to the uPVC explosion. Note that not all softwood frames are crap, but most seem to be.
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softwood and now it hardly needs a lick of paint. The Magnet pressure treated softwood windows put in at the same time are falling to pieces BUT sliding sashes are protected from the weather by 6" or so of masonry whereas the Magnet windows were flush with the wall. I think the situation is probably more important than the type of wood. If you want a deep sill on the inside, I'd go for plastic or aly.
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Hmm. I bet you actually bought good wood for the window you made yourself whereas Magnet bulk bought crap.
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Have you looked at powder-coated aluminium? We've got a pair of Monarch Monaframe patio doors & they're by far the best "windows" in the house. They've only been in for 4 years now but show absolutely no signs that they'll suffer the staining/weathering issues of uPVC.
(Barring wood) they were the only choice for the particular location as they have much less bulky frames than uPVC & therefore gave a decent glass/frame ratio.
They were fitted pre-building regs part L, but I'm sure that when I did a web search last year they were still very much available, so I presume that they can be part L compliant.
The only downside is the cost - rather higher than cheap uPVC.
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RichardS wrote:

What staining/weathering issues? Cif cream cleaner keeps them looking good as new.
MBQ
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I always wash the one ground floor UPV window and patio doors I have with plenty of warm water and a drop of washing up liquid. And do the frames at the same time. So far, they still look like new. Paintwork done at the same time they were fitted looks like it'll need doing again this year.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Perhaps the name of the new group isn't clear enough after all. :)
Follow-ups set.
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