wobble dado

wrote:

Multiple passes?

It just seems that this is a lot of setup work.

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On 1/19/17 8:06 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

If it takes multiple passes, then that kind of proves it's not good for hogging out a lot of material, right?

Again, it always depends on the task/job and tools. In my case, where I'm dealing with a pretty good dado/rabbet that just needs the "bat ears" flattened out a pattern bit is a quick way to square out the bottom without any extra set-up.
But I also already have jigs made that set up to a cut-line with no measuring/marking of any kind, so any extra set-up time is negligible.
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wrote:

Of course. We all understand routers, here. However, it's only one setup. I worry about registration errors if I were to use two tools for one operation.

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On 1/19/17 8:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Often, when I do this, I'm hogging it out on the TS a little shy of the total dimension. Then the router cuts the final dimensions, usually barely taking any wood with it.
With my dado jig, the process is very fast. https://goo.gl/photos/StFnQBzCj3J9NCcp8
But like I said, I don't always go to both TS and router. There are situation and circumstances that make it a no-brainer for me to use both and there are times when one or the other is a much better option.
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wrote:

Whether you want to take a lot or not, the registration has to be perfect. ...or you will. ;-)

Very nice. Bunch of good ideas hiding in there. Thanks!

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On 1/19/17 9:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Actually the sides of the dado are square to the surface

I may be misunderstanding what you mean by registration. Let's say I need a 3/4" dado cut exactly between 23-1/4" and 24" from the end of a bookcase side. On the table saw, maybe I will only cut a 5/8 dado slot at 23-15/16" from the edge and a tad shy of full depth. When I route the final dado slot with the router, I set my guide to the 24" and cut. It makes a very clean edge on all three sides, only having to cut 1/16" all around. That's just an example.
It's really not different than rough cutting a sheet of plywood a little large, then cutting down to the final dimension on the TS. The rough cut is largely irrelevant and the critical measurement is only done once.

Thank you, it's been really good to me. Like many of my jigs, it was only intended to be a rough prototype that would serve as a template for a final version. But it works so well, I just stuck with it.
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On 1/19/2017 11:18 PM, -MIKE- wrote: snip

Looks a lot like a design I came up with about 12~ 15 years ago. ;~)
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On 1/19/17 11:30 PM, Leon wrote:

A good songwriter is a better thief. :-)
Who knows? Whoever I stole it from probably stole it the guy who stole it from the guy who stole it from the guy who stole it from the guy who stole it from you.
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LOL I saw the concept in a WW magazine many years ago. They simply clamped apiece of wood on a cut line and used a sample piece to register another piece to clamp. And you know why we built ours the way we did. :-)
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On Friday, January 20, 2017 at 12:18:59 AM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

”It's only temporary...unless it works." ;-)
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2017 04:00:54 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary fix.
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wrote:

Ah! That's what I missed. I thought you were only cleaning up the bottoms with the router.

Yes, now I see. You're just using the saw as the rough cut, much like I use the track saw for the rough cut, cleaning it up with the table saw.

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[...]

Check out the Northwoods Dado-Master from Ridge Carbide Tools http://ridgecarbidetool.com/dado-sets/8-dado-master.html
I've had mine for about 15 years now, and have been completely satisfied with it. I bought it at the Woodworking Show when both Forrest and Ridge were exhibiting, and compared test cuts from the two side-by-side. I couldn't see any point in the Forrest Dado King: why pay more money for lesser results? The Ridge dado set is two-thirds the price of the Forrest, and gives better cuts. The bottom is dead flat, and the bat ears are almost imperceptible without a magnifying glass, whereas the Forrest leaves tiny but still readily visible bat ears.
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On 1/20/17 7:31 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

That's one I have bookmarked. I've hear great things about that set. Have to admit I'm not very happy to hear even those leave bat ears, though.
The dial-a-dado is the other set on my list. I think the convenience would be worth the extra money.
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bought it

*All* dado saws leave bat ears. The best you can do is to minimize the size. And the Ridge Carbide set leaves the smallest ones I've ever seen.

Maybe so. I'm happy with what I have, though.
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On 1/20/2017 10:59 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Swingman has the Dial's Dado and I think he is pleased with it. I use the shims with the Forrest. If you have a set of calipers the shim style dado sets are easy to adjust with out much guess work. I can typically be ready to cut dado's after one test cut. I do not think that Swingman always gets away with out a test cut.
I place the approximate set of dado cutters on the saw and finger tighten the arbor nut. I measure, with a digital caliper, the distance between the outer teeth and subtract that from the width of the material to be fitted into the dado. The difference is the size shim you need.
I don't see a clear advantage to either style, and I have seen him make multiple adjustments before cutting, mostly personal preference. I do wonder how and or if you have to return the Dial a Dado set to Freud to have it sharpened.
Having said that, if you could count on material being consistent in thickness from one job to the next the Dial A Dado could be consistently dialed in before mounting on the saw. But plywood is seldom consistent in thickness so the setting that worked on one sheet this week probably will not work on a sheet in a month. You are still going to have to do the math to get it right.

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On 1/21/17 10:03 AM, Leon wrote:

I guess the only difference is not having to remove the arbor nut to adjust it. I think that's probably reason enough to buy one, all other things being equal. The final arbiter for me would be the bat-ears thing and evenness of the bottom cut.
The Freud dado set I have now is slightly stair-stepped and Freud never did take responsibility for it. They tried to blame everything short of the Russians for it. They brought up every excuse in the book except, "Hey, maybe you got a bad chipper."
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On 1/21/2017 11:05 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

It has been a while but IIRC he, on occasions, removed the outer blade to adjust it. I may just be easier to remove the blade. You do not have to tighten the blade on regular dado blades, finger tight is good enough to measure the cutting width.

I thought the dial a dado was a pretty cool idea but I would not grade my Forrest set for that feature.

Either the blade tips were not all ground to the same distance from the center of the blade or the holes are not a good fit, or both. :~)
And visiting the bat wings again, I'm pretty particular and would never consider the ones left by my Forrest set an issue to hide. There are far worse situations that some sets do not address.
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On 1/21/17 11:50 AM, Leon wrote:

Freud's customer service and poor quality control just left a bad taste in my mouth. While overall, I've been very pleased with the quality and performance of their products, to get the shaft the one time I have an issue really makes me hesitant to pull the trigger on a higher priced item.
I've heard great things about the Forrest and Ridge sets. The fact that they are both US companies and offer their own sharpening service makes me lean in their direction.
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On 1/21/2017 1:14 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I have and like the Ridge. As for sharpening, I sent my DeWalt miter saw blade and a Freud 10" blade and both came back better than when new.
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