wobble dado

at first it sounds like an interesting idea but introducing a little too much chaos for me
they are inexpensive but would not think it would be good for the saw or the material or the operator
who has used a wobble dado
the cut could not have come out very good
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On 1/18/2017 6:51 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

You want cheap or quality? You want "close enough" or professional cuts and fit? The corners won't be as square because of the way it cuts. Another opinion here http://www.newwoodworker.com/reviews/wobbledado.html
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On 1/18/2017 6:20 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Actually the sides of the dado are square to the surface of the material but the bottom is rounded so it is not square to the sides of the dado.
I have used a wobble dado many times.
It is not harmful to the saw and it runs very smoothly.
From there, the cuts suck. The wobble dado sets cut rounded bottom dados. If you are using construction grade lumber and need to cut dados the wobble dado will suffice for rough work.
Don't use if for furniture.
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On 1/18/2017 6:43 PM, Leon wrote:

Contrary to the article you pointed at, my wobble dado did not ever vibrate. Probably cus it was a Craftsman. ;~)
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wrote:

Mine doesn't vibrate either. It just sits there at the bottom of the cabinet.
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On 1/18/2017 7:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

I think mine is in a dump somewhere.
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wrote:

Sold my hand me down one on Ebay.
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On Wednesday, January 18, 2017 at 4:43:28 PM UTC-8, Leon wrote:

I want both.
Wobble and stack both do good sidewalls; I prefer router cuts to get flat bottoms, though. Routed dado cuts can be stopped more easily, too.

That's half-true; a wobble dado blade is sharpened for ONE width to get a flat-bottomed cut, and narrower cuts have a ridge down the kerf center, while wider have dished bottoms.
If all you want is a dado to guide some slide-in inserts, wobble is fine. It doesn't require you to keep track of a lot of washers and chippers, such as are missing from my several part-sets of stacked dado blades...
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On 1/19/2017 4:44 AM, whit3rd wrote:

I'll bite, what is that one width?

If you have problems keeping up washers/shims and chippers,,,,,,,,
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wrote:

Vaires by manufacturer but I think it's 3/4" on mine.

Was wondering about that myself. Even if you lose them, they're available separately. The magnetic ones work really well.
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On 1/19/2017 12:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

I was thinking as close to the narrowest setting.
I don't want to get into a pissing contest with you here but consider this and let me know if I am missing something.
Regardless of grind if the blade is straight up and down,the narrowest setting and perpendicular to the work it will make the narrowest cut.
As you widen the wobble the blade does not protrude as far up as with the perpendicular setting "on the outsides of the cut". The teeth at the center of the blade still cuts deep and the tips of the blade, near the outer edge of the cut, do not cut as deeply. Easier to visualize using a pendulum and or a plum bob that just touches the surface and when you swing it away it no longer touches the surface.

The ones that came with my Forrest Dado set are rubber magnetic and one have gotten away after hundreds of uses.
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On 1/19/2017 1:14 PM, Leon wrote:

That should have said NONE have gotten away.
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wrote:

What you're missing is that the teeth aren't flat.

Ditto. They're available aftermarket, too.
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On 1/19/2017 8:04 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Understood but their reach is constant. The wider the cut, the shallower the cut at the edges of the dado.
Mine never gave a flat bottom.

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OK I think I can see how that can happen now. Not just the angle of grind on the teeth for a flat cut at a given width but also the teeth that remain near the center of a 3/4" cut are actually ground shorter in length than the outer cutting teeth.
That would also cause a high spot in the middle of narrower grooves or dados.
The one I had was pretty old and not made that way, the wider the dado the more cup I got in the middle of the grove or dado.
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On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 8:40:21 AM UTC-8, Leon wrote:

[about wobble-blade dados]

For a Craftsman 720.3261, 720.3262, or 720.3263, aka "93261" the instruction sheet indicates flat bottom for 3/4" width in the as-delivered condition. Presumably, if you send a wobble set to a sharpening service, you can specify a flat cut at any width you choose.
The 'W' shape kerf indicated for narrower cuts than 3/4" is fairly easy to rework with a sharp chisel, of course.
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On 1/19/2017 6:46 PM, whit3rd wrote:

I don't recall the model, LOL but mine was a Craftsman that I bought in 1979. It had a very noticeable cupped bottom that got worse the wider the cut.

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I do. From time to time. The slightly rounded bottom can be handled in a couple of ways...
1. Ignore it.
2. Clean it. I have a dado cleaning router bit for that purpose.
But mostly, I use my wobble dado to hog out most but not all of the dado/groove I want. It does that very well. I then finish with one pass of a router bit for final width and depth.
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How do you guide the router? Seems if you're going to all that trouble it would be easier to just use the router.
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On 1/19/17 12:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

True, in some cases and as usually it just depends on what you're doing. While router bits are great for making, clean, precise, square cuts, they are not particularly well suited for hogging out a bunch of material.
As people will do with rough cutting down plywood into smaller sections, then doing the precise cutting on the TS, I've done the opposite on a few projects that made it more efficient for me. You hog out the bulk of material on the TS, quickly and with little effort. They you clean it up with a precise cut using the router.
Maybe one day I'll spend the cash for an excellent set of dado blade that do, in fact, produce a perfectly straight and square bottom withOUT bat ears and I won't feel the need to clean the cut up with the router.
--

-MIKE-

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