What Are They - Rivets?

I've had these for 30+ years, just hanging around in the bottom drawer of a old, narrow set of drawers I brought home from a dead relative's shop.
https://i.imgur.com/QSAZi4n.jpg
The whole batch weighs just over 1/2 lb. I'm guessing aluminum.
https://i.imgur.com/qfGHKa5.jpg
They were found in a drawer with curved bottomed sections. The drawers must have been modified. Only 2 of the 8 have the curves and it looks like they had straight dividers at some time.
https://i.imgur.com/FKs6ApK.jpg
I wonder why those curved bottoms were added.
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On Sun, 24 Feb 2019 19:12:26 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Yes,they are aluminum rivets, They have likely hardened too much to use them without annealing. The curved bottoms in the drawers are to make it easier to remove the rivets from the drawer because they cannot "hide in the corners"
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On 2/24/2019 10:12 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Make it easier to get the items out of the drawer as they do not get caught in the corners.
--
2018: The year we learn to play the great game of Euchre

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On Monday, February 25, 2019 at 7:30:03 AM UTC-5, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

That's what I thought. But I wonder why only those 2 of the 8 drawers had curved bottom section even through the rest of the drawers contain all sorts of small part - nuts, screws, etc.
They sure don't make them like that anymore. Any "small parts storage" you see today is all flat bottomed. More space, less cost, I guess.
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On 2/25/2019 6:40 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

People working with small iron projects still use them.
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On 2/24/2019 10:12 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

What's funny is, you've had them for 30 years and don't even know what they are. Don't throw them out, you just might need one some day. I understand.
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On 2/25/2019 8:06 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

There are two types of people in this world, Those that keep everything indefinitely because they know they well need it in the future, and those who those who throw every thing out because they know they will never need it again.
I understand the OP view point as I also know there is a future need for all of the junk in my garage.
One of the things I have that I know there is a use for, but have not figured it out yet; is the nice rigid plastic jars with the screw on lids. They look like they would be useful to store something in. Has any one figured out what?
--
2018: The year we learn to play the great game of Euchre

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On Monday, February 25, 2019 at 8:02:06 AM UTC-6, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote: .... nice rigid plastic jars with the screw on

Put slips of paper, each with your pending projects, in the jar. When it's time for the next project, select one. Optional: Store the jar in the trash can.
Sonny
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On 2/25/2019 7:06 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Indeed, I just had need for some of the rivets been in the barn since the 1930/40's as bought an old Ford 501 sickle mower.
There are still rivets and a few sections from the old McCormick-Deering twine binder, the Massey Model 90 combine and I don't recall what else there, but "ya' never know" when the need may arise...
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Used both of them (well, the massey 60 pull-behind combine anyway), back in the day (60's/70's).
http://www.lurndal.org/images/thresh1-300.jpg
and the Massey baler:
http://www.lurndal.org/images/baler.jpg
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On 2/25/2019 10:04 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Our last pull-type was old Gleaner---we kids played on it as all kinds of things it could become with the big spoked wheel on the operator platform could be ship's wheel or...

That's stationary thresher--not sure exactly which...

Here's video of a twine binder -- been converted to PTO or perhaps by '30s maybe Deering had shifted over. Ours had been converted to pull by tractor but was still ground drive...
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Not sure. It was painted red. I don't have any pictures of the binder, unfortunately, and it was auctioned off when my Grandparents passed.
Side view of threshing rig (with the Farmall B pulling the hayrack):
http://www.lurndal.org/images/thresh2-300.jpg
And a poor front view with the Farmall M running the belt
http://www.lurndal.org/images/thresh2-300.jpg
All circa 1972 or thereabouts.

Yeah, our (well Grandfathers) binder was also ground drive. Spent several summers following it around shocking oats.
s
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On 2/25/2019 12:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote: ...

...
We never bound/shocked grain crops, only feed sorghum for winter feed. The stiff stocks with it made for a very nicely tied bundle. I'm still amazed at how those metal fingers could tie such a nice knot almost every time. That was a clever designer, indeed!
When/if feed got to be more than about 4-5 ft tall, though, the bundles got to be awfully difficult to handle when they'd sat in a shock in field all winter and blown full of sand at the bottom and then with a snow...
That's really neat to have some of the pictures...I have only a very few that show any of the equipment or action. There's one of grandfather (we think) sitting on the wagon with mule team in front of the then near-new barn (begun after WWI armistice was signed so could get the lumber to go ahead).
Where is that geographically? Too many trees for SW KS. :)
We had four M's at the time I first was big enough to climb on one and reach (with effort) the clutch. They were all wide-front ends.
In the 30s/40s, grandpa had three or four Cat 22s; a 22-drawbar hp miniature modern-day-looking Caterpillar with the big cast iron radiator and everything...looked exactly like a D4 or the like that got left out in the rain and just shrank to about quarter-size. Used them for rowcrop work with 3-row JD lister and cultivator. Still had one until the '60s it was sold to a collector/restorer in town and now resides in WY.
I don't recall just exactly when but went to Farmall 400s and eventually to the 560 (a real dog) before finally Dad made the switch to green with the first 4020 for row crop. Had also gotten Case 990 wheatland for the flatwork.
Grandpa as got older but still wanted to do some fieldwork bought a little AC WD-45 with full line of the "snap coupler" toolbar implements. In like '58-59 time frame traded it up to a D-17 and I did about half the rowcrop planting and all the cultivating/knife-sledding with it until left for college...unfortunately, all that was sold in the retirement auction when dad retired; he kept only the JD 4440 which still use for the hay work and mowing, etc., ... All our farmed ground was put into Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) permanent native grass at that time as well as all of the rented land we farmed so no longer raising cash grain crops; "just" maintaining the grass and running some cattle on that which is now-expired CRP while we decide what to do with that ground going forward for longer term.
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Yeah. I wish I'd had my current digital SLR fifty years ago rather than that silly little 141 camera.

Just outside of Modena, Wisconsin, at the northern portion of the driftless area.

My maternal grandfather (who still used the threshing rig) had a B and a pair of much larger Minneapolis-Moline hand-clutch tractors. His neighbor, with whom the binder/thresher were shared, had a Super-C and the M.
My paternal grandfather and uncle were mainly Massey Harris/Ferguson (MF 50, MF 65, MF 180, a Ford 8-N and later, a used JD A).
The B was the first one I was allowed to drive.

The MF65 (above) has been very nicely restored (and was last used to transport my Uncle's coffin from the church to the cemetery).
http://www.lurndal.org/images/robert/dsc02924_small.jpg

[snip] ., ... All our farmed ground

The maternal farm was sold when my grandmother passed. The paternal farm is now in the hands of my cousin (driving the tractor, above) and my dad's cousins and is used as a deer hunting preserve (the flat parts are row-cropped (corn & alfalfa) by another cousin for his dairy operation (several hundred head with one of those fancy automatic milking parlors)).
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On 2/25/2019 2:07 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
...

M-M and M-F never really caught on out here...there were enough M-M to keep a dealership afloat for a while (our one neighbor to south was the only one in the county I really know who had them) but just marginally.
The Massey dealer maybe sold one or two tractors a year but the M-H combines dominated by a wide margin over Gleaner and then the others bringing up the rear.
IH/Farmall and Case dominated with a fair amount of green paint around (but nothing approaching a plurality, what more majority) until the 4000 series revolutionized everything. Now JD green is 80+% I'd guess for major equipment; CIH being a distant second. Kubota orange is pretty popular for the utility/smaller sizes for haying operations and the like because of the initial price entry point advantage--and they are a good product besides. They just don't have the HP ratings for big operations out here, though, with 24-row planters and 120-ft spray rigs now common.
...

That is priceless and most appropriate.
And, the restoration looks impeccable, besides... :)
Enjoyed the reminscences and always interesting to hear of others' as well.
--


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On 2/25/2019 7:06 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

He'll definitely need them. . . but not until one week after he's thrown them out!
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On 2/24/2019 9:12 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I used rivets like this in shop class, in 1969.
You drill a hole through pieces of metal to be attached with a rivet.
You slide the rivet through the holes, round end sits on an anvil with a cupped indention that matches the shape of the rivet.
You take a large ball peen hammer and whack the rivet until the end flares out and captures the pieces of metal.
I do not recall the name of the tool, but you place a hand held tool, with a similar indentation as the anvil, over the end you just finished hammering and give it a couple of blows to form a finished look to the end of the rivet.
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On 2/25/2019 10:02 AM, Leon wrote:

FWIW the curved bottoms are the closed end of the rivet. AND the rivet is complete, there is no other piece to go with it.
I still have, well my son has, the band iron magazine rack that I built 50 years ago. IIRC the band iron was 1/8" thick and 1"~1.5" wide.
There are 12 separate pieces of band iron and 23 rivets.
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wrote:

Still use the aluminum solid rivets building aircraft today. Hammer and bucking bar. Need to cut the rivets to accurate length for the "grip" required.
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On 2/24/2019 9:12 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

...
Could be but unless your relative was in aircraft or like I'd think more likely just soft iron for routine use as sickle rivets and the like.
Are they nonmagnetic?
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