Rusty Drill Press Column, Part II

The drill press is now less rusty than it was and acceptable for use. Is there something we could apply to lubricate the column and keep it from rusting again? Paste wax maybe?
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On Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 1:29:44 PM UTC-5, Greg Guarino wrote:



I vote wax. I apply wax to my 1950s vintage Rockwell drill press column. If you apply an oily product, it will collect sawdust and other grime..... same with applying an oil product to vice threads and other like tools, co llects sawdust and misc grime.
My Craftsman drill press column needs de-rusting and waxing, as well. Tha nks for the reminder.
Sonny
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this works great for me:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/SC-Johnson-1-lb-Fine-Wood-Paste-Wax-00203/100154748
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On 10/12/2017 2:29 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I use a good grade of liquid car wax on all of the shiny surfaces on the tools in my shop. This includes the drill press column, the tables on the saw, drill press, and tools like squares, etc.
I do it about once a year, but it would vary with your use of the tool.
Every several years I clean the surfaces with a petroleum material, gas, light oil, etc. or what ever I place my hands on first. Remove any residuals and rewax. This helps prevent a build up of wax on any of the surfaces.
--
2017: The year we learn to play the great game of Euchre

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wrote:

Top Kote or BoeShield, would be my choice.
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On Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 2:29:44 PM UTC-4, Greg Guarino wrote:

ok, If you search this board, I had some great replies to the same question on my table saw's surface. For my purposes, I have had luck in the past with paste wax, but it was no longer working in a new shop.
If you try that route, I'd think that the wax would also help to lubricate the gears on your column-- it's not exactly a substitute for grease, but you could do worse, too.
I tried the TopKote (which now has a new name: GLIDE COTE) and I like it, but you need to re-apply, pretty often.
On the other hand, the "Krud Kutter: the Must for rust" I mentioned is also an inhibitor-- I used this one on my cast iron band saw table, and it looks like the day I put it on. No issues with need to re-coat or breakdown whatsoever.
unless you find another way to lubricate your cogs, (preferably not WD 40, 'cause that'll break down any of the previously mentioned finishes), I'd try the paste first in your situation.
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the GlideCote, on the other hand looks great-- important for my table; not as important for the band saw, not at all for your column, I'd think.
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