Radial arm saw versus 12" compund sliding miter saw question.

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krw wrote:

Yes, as a matter of fact. That's because 90% of what I do on it is ripping...that's what table saws were designed for.
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dadiOH
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That may be what they're best at but hardly all they were designed for. I suppose yours doesn't have a miter slot either.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yeah, it has a miter slot. Damned useless when I want to chop of 2' from an 8' x6"x2" piece of oak.
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dadiOH
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wrote:

What you need is a better miter gauge or sled. ;~) I was doing almost that a couple of weeks ago. 2, 1x6 oak 8' long with 2 more the same size clamped in front. Basically I had a 2x12. I needed all to be exactly the same length. I clamped all the pieces together so that they would not slip and then clamped the group to my miter gauge. A friend arrived as I was getting ready to make the cut. I told him to not try this at home. All went well, no excitement and I ended with what I expected.
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Leon wrote:

Glad it worked out for you :)
I do have a dandy sled, BTW, use it mostly for trimming panels up tp 3'x5', no good for long stuff as I have insufficient room for long stock to hang off the table; NP, I just plop it down on my RAS. If I didn't have that, I'd use saw horses and a circular saw. Where there is a will there is a way :)
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dadiOH
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For example, using a blade that isn't designed for a RAS could draw the saw more quickly into the work. This could result in bending the saw blade or possibly bending the arbor on the motor.
Gordon Shumway
Our Constitution needs to be used less as a shield for the guilty and more as a sword for the victim.
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On Fri, 04 Dec 2009 11:19:43 -0600, Gordon Shumway

Don't use dull blades. You'll put your eye out.
As I said, none of the blades at Woodcraft this weekend had any limitations on the types of saws they were designed for, though for some reason one didn't have the symbol for a contractor's saw but it did have the symbol for a cabinet saw.
I can somehow believe that one blade might cut cleaner on a table saw vs. RAS but I ain't buying the "injure the tools" argument. I wasn't born last night.
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If you don't believe it, try quickly pulling your RAS though a wide thick piece of hardwood and see what you end up with.
Go to Forrest and read what they have to say.
http://www.forrestsawbladesonline.com /
Gordon Shumway
Our Constitution needs to be used less as a shield for the guilty and more as a sword for the victim.
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Gordon Shumway wrote:

Either two pieces of hardwood or a stalled saw and it doesn't matter _what_ blade you're using that will be the case.

They say quite a lot. Do you have something specific in mind or are you just shilling for Forrest?
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On Sun, 6 Dec 2009 23:01:09 -0500, "J. Clarke"

They have different blades (hook angles) for different saws. In the self destruct test I described above, that was to simulate what could happen on a RAS if the wrong blade was used and it could result in the blade being pulled into the work more aggressively than the operator was expecting.
As far as being a shill for Forrest -- not hardly. However, after looking at their site they didn't say much about hook angle relative to specific saw types. On the following page for Rockler read what is said about hook angle there. They say it much better than I could. Oh yeah, I'm not connected with Rockler either :-)
http://www.rockler.com/articles/display_article.cfm?story_idr
Gordon Shumway
Our Constitution needs to be used less as a shield for the guilty and more as a sword for the victim.
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Though all this information is available. Idiots are able to bankrupt many companys.
Mike M
On Sun, 06 Dec 2009 23:27:05 -0600, Gordon Shumway

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Gordon Shumway wrote:

And how does that "injure the tools"?

Still nothing about injuring tools. Yeah, I know with some blades I have to work harder at controlling the carriage than with others, but "injure the tool"? Sorry, but if stalling the saw "injures the tool" it was a piece of crap to begin with.
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for Forrest?

Try to visualize a blade pulling too aggressively into a board and actually climbing higher in the cut. I saw it happen a few times with my old RAS 30+ years ago. Typically the motor blade assy. tries to climb up on top of the board, stalls and becomes lodged in that position. Naturally the arm, shaft or base gives as the blade climbs up higher in the cut. This repeated action will weaken and eventually damage the saw.
This can easily happen with the correct blade, this is the nature of the beast, but with the wrong blade the situation can be aggravated.
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Leon wrote:

I'm not denying that one can stall an RAS. In fact I believe I stated that that was what would happen. However if it cannot withstand without damage any force that the motor can produce then it is a poorly designed piece of crap.

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Yeah... and ... that might by why most RAS's have such a bad reputation, why many are always out of calibration.
But the stall happens after the blade has climbed up higher on the cut. That will cause undue stress to something.
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Leon wrote:

Only if the "something" is not properly designed to withstand the "undue stress".
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J. Clarke wrote:

No one can design anything to withstand every type of "undue stress" caused by idiots or the ill informed. Look at computers...
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dadiOH wrote:

Uh, we aren't talking about "every type of undue stress caused by idiots or the uninformed", we are talking about an obvious kind of stress that any engineer should expect to be encountered by the saw during normal operation. They know what motor they put on it, they know how much torque it produces, they know the moment arm, they know the ramp angle, from that it's easy to calculate how much stress it's going to put on the arm if it stalls.
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Uh, I thought we "were" talking about "idiot's" your word ;~) using the wrong blade on a machine.
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No, it's you who defends the ludicrous idea that blades cannot be interchanged between saw types without "injuring" the iron.
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